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2022 Annual Conference Sessions

Advancing Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in CSD (.4 CEUs)

4/20/22 Morning Precon

Location
Pavillion East
Speakers
  • Brandi L. Newkirk-Turner, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Professor
    Brandi L. Newkirk-Turner, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is the Associate Provost for Academic Affairs at Jackson State University and a professor of Communicative Disorders. Her research examines issues that are relevant to the speech-language assessment of African American English-speaking children; best practices in preparing graduate students to serve culturally and linguistically diverse populations; and barriers, opportunities, and potential impacts in reducing or eliminating equity gaps of underserved student populations in higher education.
  • Vicki Deal-Williams, MA, CCC-SLP, FASAE, CAE - Chief Executive Officer
    Vicki R. Deal-Williams, MA, CCC-SLP, FASAE, CAE is ASHA’s Chief Executive Officer. She is an ASHA-certified speech-language pathologist, who has worked in diversity and inclusion, Association leadership, and strategic planning for over 35 years. Vicki is a Fellow of ASHA and the American Society of Association Executives and received her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees at Northwestern University.
Summary
An equitable and inclusive culture in CSD academic programs is critical for sustaining the future of the professions of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology. This encompasses the recruitment and retention of diverse faculty and students, faculty and student development, curriculum reform, and enhancing clinical education. This session will offer approaches for applying an equity lens and identifying strategies for improvements.

Learning Objectives:
  • Identify the benefits of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in preparing CSD professionals.
  • Describe the process for conducting a departmental needs assessment of DEI practices, and establishing a strategic equity action plan.
  • Identify at least three strategies for addressing diversity, equity, and/or inclusion.
  • Considerations for Implementing Holistic Review for Graduate Admissions in CSD Programs (.4 CEUs)

    4/20/22 Afternoon Precon

    Location
    Skyline II
    Speakers
    • Danai Kasambira Fannin, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Danai Kasambira Fannin PhD, CCC-SLP, is an associate professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at North Carolina Central University and Co-Chair of CAPCSD’s Diversity Equity and Inclusion committee. She is a Speech-Language Pathologist with research interests in appropriate services for culturally and linguistically diverse people, interdisciplinary communication intervention for children with developmental disabilities, and determinants of access to autism services for children in underserved and rural areas.
    • Kerry C. Mandulak, Ph.D, CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Kerry Callahan Mandulak, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is associate professor and chair of the graduate admissions committee in the School of Communication Sciences & Disorders at Pacific University. Her research program focuses on investigating the feasibility and methods of implementing holistic review for graduate admissions. She presents nationally within the discipline and adjacent disciplines in order to pursue her goal of continuing the national conversation around this important work.
    Summary
    As gatekeepers to the profession, graduate programs have the responsibility of training the next generation of professionals. Inclusive and equitable admission strategies should focus on assessing a balance of metrics, experiences, and attributes to recruit students from more diverse backgrounds. This session will include consideration of methods and strategies for implementing holistic review for graduate admissions in CSD, in order to continue to examine ways to diversify incoming student cohorts, include historically excluded but capable and qualified applicants, reconsider notions of merit in our discipline, mitigate implicit and explicit biases, and discontinue systems that perpetuate exclusionary criteria within admissions processes.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Define the foundational tenets of holistic review, defined by the initiatives set forth by the American Association of Medical Colleges (AAMC) and implemented successfully in other allied health professions;
  • Identify and discuss the evidence for including non-cognitive variables (Sedlacek, 2017) in admissions processes, in addition to
  • identifying specific criteria and evaluation methods for a holistic review of applicants;
  • Identify 2 - 3 strategies or solutions that may shift admissions processes to be more equitable and inclusive.
  • Mindfulness, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, and Counseling in CSD: An Experiential Session (.4 CEUs)

    4/20/22 Afternoon Precon

    Location
    Broadway I/II
    Speakers
    • Scott T. Palasik, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Scott is an Associate Professor and director of the Mindfulness Behaviors and Social Cognition Stuttering Lab at the University of Akron. He has been an SLP for 20 years, teaches graduate courses, has published research, and has presented at international, national, state, and local conferences. He's also the cofounder of 3C Digital Media Network and Co-Host of the The ACT To Live Podcast and Blog.
    Summary
    Communication Sciences and Disorders has a long history of teaching students counseling skills in order to deeper understand and assist clients and families. This hands-on workshop will focus on the basics of, and the practicing of mindfulness in the context of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). Neurological research related to mindfulness and ACT practices will be discussed, along with active listening skills and how it all leads to resilience for our students and clients when we enhance counseling skills. In this session, attendees will learn and apply mindfulness, ACT, and listening skills through experiential learning.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Define mindfulness within the six core principles of ACT.
  • Summarize one current finding regarding the ways in which mindfulness practices and/or ACT practices may be physically changing the brain.
  • Describe methods to engage graduate students to practice mindfulness, ACT, and other counseling skills.
  • Newcomers' Orientation

    4/20/2022 Newcomers' Orientation

    Location
    Pavillion East
    Speakers
    • Carol Dudding, Ph.D. - CAPCSD Past-President
    • Heidi Verticchio - CAPCSD Conference Chair
    • Jennifer Taylor - CAPCSD President-Elect
    • Michael Bamdad, M.A - CAPCSD President
    • Tricia Montgomery - CAPCSD VP of Professional Development
    Summary
    Meet with the Conference Planning Committee and the CAPCSD Board to hear highlights of the conference as you navigate your first CAPCSD Annual Conference.

    x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S1)

    4/20/2022 Newcomers' Orientation

    Location
    No Room

    Welcome Reception

    4/20/2022 Welcome Reception

    Location
    Pavilion Foyer and Atrium Ballroom
    Summary
    Reconnect with your peers and spend time with the exhibitors as the 2022 CAPCSD Conference kicks off.

    x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S2)

    4/20/2022 Welcome Reception

    Location
    No Room

    Connecting Culturally Diverse Students to Your University (.15 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Opening/Plenary 1

    Location
    Pavilion Ballroom
    Speakers
    • Kia Noelle Johnson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Director
      Kia Noelle Johnson, Ph.D.,CCC-SLP, is an Associate Professor at the University of Houston (TX) in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders. She specializes in Fluency and Fluency Disorders with focus on childhood stuttering. Her research interest is in the examination of speech disfluencies in culturally/linguistically diverse children. She serves on the ASHA Board of Directors, is the National Advisor to National NSSLHA, and chairs the NBASLH Board of Directors.
    Summary
    CSD programs are focusing more on recruiting a culturally diverse body of students into the AuD and SLP professions. A challenge exists to better support admitted students from culturally diverse backgrounds especially those identified as underrepresented in the professions. Lessons can be learned from an institutional example of successful steps taken by CSD programs to support students of diversity. In this session, discussion will involve addressing needs in the department and how to advocate at all levels of the institution.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Define cultural diversity and underrepresented backgrounds in CSD and the impact to students in academic and clinical training.
  • Identify common needs of culturally diverse CSD students in graduate programs across institutional levels (department, college, university).
  • Discuss successful mechanisms and resources to support culturally diverse students at the department level, university level, and the profession.
  • x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S3)

    4/21/2022 Opening/Plenary 1

    Location
    No Room

    x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S4)

    4/21/2022 Concurrent Sessions A

    Location
    No Room

    Beyond Pronouns: Creating an Inclusive Program for Transgender and Gender Diverse Students (.1 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Concurrent Sessions A

    Location
    Skyline I
    Speakers
    • Aaron Rothbart, M.S., CCC-SLP - Clinical Supervisor/Doctoral Student
      Aaron Rothbart, a doctoral student at the University of Oregon, has worked in a variety of medical settings and as a lead clinical researcher. He served on several district advisory boards and as a member of the ASHA TBI Topic Committee. Aaron has presented at the state and national levels.
    • David Bayne, M.S., CCC-SLP - Doctoral Student/Clinical Supervisor
      David is a doctoral student with a clinical and research interest in dysphagia as seen in progressive neurological diseases. His goal is to foster a deeper understanding of the biopsychosocial impacts of feeding-related behaviors and how to harness these therapeutically to promote healthy mealtime interactions.
    • Jayme Sloan M.S., CCC-SLP - Externship Coordinator
      Jayme Sloan, MS CCC-SLP is a clinical supervisor and is the medical externship coordinator for the University of Oregon Communication Disorders and Sciences Program. Prior to starting at the University, Jayme primarily worked in Skilled Nursing Facilities but also has experience in Home Health and Private Practice. She enjoys mentoring graduate students and treating clients with language, motor speech and swallowing impairments.
    • Jennifer Meyer, M.S. CCC-SLP - Director of Clinical Education
      Jennifer Meyer is the Director of Clinical Education at the University of Oregon working with diverse students, clients, and colleagues. She actively engages in social justice/advocacy work in her workplace and community. Jennifer's other interest areas include gender-affirming communication services and clinical training and mentoring clinical educators.
    Summary
    Transgender and gender diverse students face adversity in classroom and clinical settings that impact their confidence, success, and sense of belonging. These students’ needs are frequently overlooked in conversations around creating inclusive learning environments. Often simple, intentional modifications to curriculum, clinical training materials, syllabi, and classroom expectations can have a large impact on programmatic culture and inclusivity. Due to intersecting identities within our student body, there is no single step that can be taken to ensure inclusion. This presentation will challenge you to use a critical lens when identifying and implementing opportunities to advance your program in gender inclusivity.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Describe the gender diversity and accepted language/terminology around the gender spectrum.
  • Identify 3 challenges that gender diverse and transgender students face in CSD education.
  • Examine at least 3 actions that can be taken in your program to enhance gender inclusivity.
  • Connecting with Community Partners (.1 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Concurrent Sessions A

    Location
    Skyline II
    Speakers
    • Erin EG. Lundblom, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor/Director of SLP Clinical Education
      Erin E.G. Lundblom is an Associate Professor and Director of Speech-Language Pathology Clinical Educaiton at the University of Pittsburgh, where she provides course instruction to both undergraduate and graduate students. Her areas of interest encompass best practice in the provision of clinical instruction, school-based language and literacy services including service delivery options, and higher education pedagogy.
    • Trent Westrick, Au.D. - Associate Professor/Clinical Practicum Coordinator
      Trent Westrick, AuD, is an Associate Professor and Clinical Practicum Coordinator in the School of Audiology at Pacific University in Oregon. He teaches amplification, cerumen management, ototoxicity, and audiology skills labs courses, in addition to precepting first- and second-year AuD students in Pacific's on-campus audiology clinic.
    Summary
    Successful development and refinement of student clinical skills depend on high-quality, effective external clinical placement sites and preceptors. This session will provide an overview of the essential elements of the site and preceptor attributes. It also will discuss strategies for establishing and maintaining relationships with these important partners.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Describe elements of appropriate clinical sites.
  • List characteristics and skills of effective preceptors.
  • Develop strategies for establishing and maintaining productive relationships with sites and preceptors.
  • Ideas for Applying Academic Metrics Through an Equity Lens: Implications for Admissions (.1 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Concurrent Sessions A

    Location
    Pavillion West
    Speakers
    • Leigh Schaid AuD - Associate Professor
      Leigh G. Schaid, AuD, is an Associate Professor at Pacific University. She serves as a clinical provider, preceptor, and instructor in the AuD program. Her area of practice includes pediatric diagnostics, with a focus on the birth-three population. Her research interests focus on holistic review in health professions admissions. Currently, she is also pursuing a PhD in education and leadership through Pacific University.
    Summary
    Programs must ensure matriculating students are prepared for graduate coursework; traditionally measured by GPA and standardized tests. In an effort to increase access and provide more equity, many graduate programs eliminated requiring the GRE. That leaves admissions committees two metrics to determine academic ability: overall GPA and major GPA. However, what if those metrics don’t tell the entire story of an applicant’s preparedness? Other professions have begun evaluating additional GPAs, (science GPA, adjusting GPA for socio-economic disadvantage, etc), with success (Massey et al, 2020; Fenton et al, 2016). This session will explore those ideas and make recommendations for our fields.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Discuss the need to rethink how academic metrics are used in graduate admissions in order to increase access for underrepresented students.
  • Determine which types of new GPA calculations may benefit their programs’ mission, vision, and admissions goals.
  • Prioritize which metrics should be evaluated for use in their programs, through examining admissions and outcome data for alignment.
  • Pharmacology Education in the AUD Curriculum: Current Practices and Future Directions (.1 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Concurrent Sessions A

    Location
    Forum Suite
    Speakers
    • Colleen Le Prell, Ph.D. - Professor/Chair
      Dr. Colleen Le Prell is the Emilie and Phil Schepps Distinguished Professor of Hearing Science at the University of Texas at Dallas, Chair of the UTD Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing, and Head of the Ph.D. Program in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences. Current research programs in her laboratory include translational research programs directed at prevention of noise-induced hearing loss.
    • Dana Libman, AUD, F-AAA - Assistant Professor
      Dana Libman, AuD is an assistant professor serving as a clinical audiologist at the University of Miami. Her primary interests include diagnostics, hearing aids, hearing conservation, and ototoxicity. Dr. Libman is involved with the American Academy of Audiology and National Hearing Conservation Association.
    • Nancy McKenna - AuD, Ph.D., F-AAA
      Nancy McKenna AuD, Ph.D. provides comprehensive diagnostic and rehabilitative audiology services at the UNC Hearing and Communication Center. As a faculty member in the audiology doctoral program at UNC Chapel Hill, she teaches courses including Genetics of the Peripheral Auditory System, Hearing Disorders, Teaching and Supervision, and Tinnitus and Pharmacology in Clinical Practice. She brings to her practice a diverse background including a research career in biomedical sciences.
    • Robert DiSogra, AuD, F-AAA - Consulting Audiologist
      Dr. Robert M. DiSogra is an audiology consultant in Millstone, NJ. His 45-year professional career has included clinical, industrial, teaching and research positions. Dr. DiSogra has published and presented many lectures, seminars, podcasts, and webinars at many allied health organizations in the United States and internationally Dr. DiSogra is a US Navy veteran and served during the Vietnam era.
    • Samuel Atcherson Ph.D. - Professor
      Samuel R. Atcherson, PhD, FNAP, is professor of audiology and professor of otolaryngology—head and neck surgery at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. His clinical and research efforts focus on audiologic rehabilitation needs, auditory and vestibular electrophysiology, and health literacy, and he is director of the Auditory Electrophysiology and (Re)habilitation Laboratory.
    Summary
    Recently, the importance of pharmacological processes in audiological practice has become more widely recognized. A recent AAA study that explored the potential role of audiologists in the provision of pharmaceutical agents for the prevention/treatment of hearing loss identified an apparent lack of consistency in pharmacology education in AUD programs. To better understand this issue, we surveyed the 80 audiology programs about current practices, challenges, and benefits. Results indicate that many programs provide a limited foundation. Those with dedicated courses report value for students but challenges in implementation. We will discuss current practices, best practices, program needs, and future directions.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Describe current practices in pharmacology education in AUD programs and why programs have chosen such different approaches.
  • Understand the education and skills required to develop the competence needed to address possible pharmaceutical treatment for otoprotection or uncomplicated ear conditions in conjunction with traditional audiologic care.
  • Discuss the pros and cons of possible expansion of audiologic scope of practice in the context of results of an evaluation of the AUD programs' educational content in pharmacology.
  • Facilitating Best Practices in Clinical Education - Where to Now? (.1 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Concurrent Sessions A

    Location
    Atrium Ballroom
    Speakers
    • Kevin M. McNamara, M.A., CCC-SLP, ASHA Fellow - Clinical Director Emeritus
      Kevin McNamara is Clinical Director Emeritus in the Department of Communication Disorders at Southern Connecticut State University. He has presented workshops and research on clinical education. Mr. McNamara has served on the 2016 ASHA Ad Hoc Committee on Supervision Training, as committee member and Chair of the CAPCSD Committee for Clinical Education Resources, and currently serves as CAPCSD VP for Clinical Education.
    Summary
    Recent continuing education requirements for preceptors/clinical educators have initiated a greater awareness of evidence-based practices in clinical instruction of audiology and speech-language pathology students. Available continuing education courses foster understanding and application of foundational best practices for such instruction. In this session, opportunities for and barriers to advancing higher-level preceptor/clinical educator skills will be discussed. Session participants will identify strategies for programs to foster growth in current best practice methods in clinical instruction while maintaining and enhancing relationships with their preceptors/clinical educators.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Examine the history of and rationale for clinical educator/preceptor training.
  • Describe barriers against and opportunities for advancement of higher-level clinical educator skills that may exist in clinical education programs.
  • Identify one or more strategies for advancing higher-level clinical educator skills of university and community-based clinical educators/preceptors.
  • This Meeting Could Have Been an Email: Running Effective and Efficient Meetings (.1 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Concurrent Sessions A

    Location
    Pavillion East
    Speakers
    • Jennifer P. Taylor, Au.D., CCC-A - Clinical Associate Professor
      Jennifer P. Taylor is Director of Clinical Services in Audiology and Clinical Associate Professor at the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Memphis. She is the Audiologist for the LEND Program for UTHSC, Center on Developmental Disabilities, and provides audiological services in the areas of pediatric diagnostics and auditory processing. She serves as President-Elect for CAPCSD. Dr. Taylor volunteers at the local, state, and national levels.
    • Mark DeRuiter, M.B.A., PhD, CCC-A/SLP - Professor
      Mark DeRuiter MBA, PhD, is Professor and Director of the Clinical Science Doctorate in Speech-Language Pathology at the University of Pittsburgh. He has held varied higher education CSD roles including clinic director, graduate program director, and associate department head. He has a long history of classroom teaching. Mark serves on the CAPCSD Board as well as the Founding Editorial Board of Teaching and Learning in Communication Sciences and Disorders.
    Summary
    Time is limited. It is, therefore, essential that faculty meetings be both productive and efficient. This session will provide strategies for streamlining meetings and facilitating increased efficiency and effectiveness. The attendee will leave with tools and methods for successful implementation of faculty meetings.
    Identify characteristics of successful meetings.
  • Describe tools available to facilitate meeting efficiency and productivity.
  • Identify opportunities for continued mentorship of new faculty members during the first year.
  • Academic Teaching and Clinical Skill-Building: Lessons Learned During the Pandemic (.05 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Posters 1

    Location
    Galleria Ballroom
    Speakers
    • Amy Rodriquez, M.S., CF - Clinical Fellow
    • Catherine Crowley, J.D., Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Professor of Practice
      Catherine Crowley, J.D., Ph.D., CCC-SLP, Professor of Practice in CSD program at Teachers College, Columbia University where she founded the bilingual/multicultural program focus and the Bilingual SLP Institute. An ASHA Fellow and experienced attorney, Dr. Crowley works to enhance the quality of services that children/adolescents receive, particularly bilingual and minoritized students. Dr. Crowley been recognized nationally and internationally for her work. Her widely-accessed website, leadersproject.org, offers free courses and resources.
    • Diana Acevedo, M.S., CCC-SLP - Clinical Supervisor
    Summary
    During the pandemic, the authors reimagined their graduate cleft palate course. They present online learning opportunities they developed and will incorporate into future course offering. They used various software allowing students to do a step-by=step analysis, with immediate feedback, of evaluations and therapy using videos of simulated cases. Students provided clinical services in supervised online breakout rooms. In one section, all course content was delivered in Spanish, allowing 3 hours of immersive Spanish four days a week. Authors describe how this online training benefited students and can be effective in providing greater access to health care worldwide.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Identify two software programs that can be used to build skills in online learning environments to develop cleft palate speech therapy including PlayPosit and video uploads demonstrating skill acquisition.
  • Describe how students participated in skill-building breakout rooms and therapy demonstrations in capacity-building cleft palate speech therapy trainings in Guatemala, Indonesia, and Colombia.
  • Identify how to establish an online speech therapy opportunities for graduate students collaborating with cleft palate teams in hospitals so their patients can receive supplemental cleft palate speech therapy.
  • x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S5)

    4/21/2022 Posters 1

    Location
    No Room

    Empathy for Understanding: Using Virtual Reality to Facilitate Clinical Reasoning for ASD (.05 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Posters 1

    Location
    Galleria Ballroom
    Speakers
    • Anne Perrotti, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Anne Marie Perrotti, PhD, CCC-SLP, Associate Professor, Undergraduate Program Director, Old Dominion University Dr. Anne Marie Perrotti is passionate about transformative and equitable teaching and learning. As an Associate Professor at Old Dominion University, she dedicates her research to bridging perspectives using an interprofessional approach combining entrepreneurship and design thinking for the development of innovative solutions which improve outcomes for young adults in the school-to-confinement pipeline and speech-language pathology students.
    Summary
    Speech-language pathology (SLP) students are primed to generate clinical reasoning skills required to create and implement appropriate and effective intervention to a variety of patient populations. A core concept supporting this learning process is evidence-based practice (EBP). EBP includes three important components: 1) scientific evidence; 2) clinician expertise; 3) client and family perspectives. This poster session will explain how virtual reality technology was leveraged to create an immersive, experiential student learning experience for SLP students that facilitated understanding of perspectives which support EBP regarding the realities of living with a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

    Learning Objectives:
  • Define and describe virtual reality.
  • Discuss the application of virtual reality for experiential learning.
  • List three benefits of using virtual reality to facilitate learning about evidence-based practice.
  • Formal Ethics Training with Speech-Language Pathology Graduate Students (.05 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Posters 1

    Location
    Grand Ballroom Foyer
    Speakers
    • Jennifer N. Gaylord, CScD, CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor
      Dr. J. Nikki Gaylord, CCC-SLP is an assistant professor at Murray State University in the Center for Communication Disorders and has been a practicing speech-language pathologist for over 20 years. She completed her doctorate of clinical science in speech-language pathology in 2019 and is currently working toward completion of a doctorate of education. Her current research interests include exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction in athletes, exercise-induced dyspnea, and ethics in speech-language pathology.
    • Stephanie M. Schaaf, Ed.D., CCC-SLP - Program Director/Assistant Professor
      Stephanie Schaaf, Ed.D, CCC-SLP, is program director and an assistant professor at Murray State University. In addition to supervising students, she enjoys teaching graduate courses relating to speech sound disorders, research, professional issues, AAC, and counseling. Before transitioning to the university, she worked in a variety of settings, including skilled nursing, home health, and public schools. Her current research and clinical pursuits include supervision, phonology, voice, AAC, and leadership
    Summary
    While recent changes to ethics training guidelines were made for practicing speech-language pathologists, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) has provided no such recommendations or changes regarding ethics education for graduate students (ASHA, 2020a). ASHA (2020b) indicates that training of professional skills such as ethics be embedded within the curriculum of a graduate program with no specific guidance regarding instructional method. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of the current informal method of instruction for ethics in a graduate speech-language pathology program using content embedded in existing curriculum as compared to a more formal ethics training program.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Discuss pertinent literature that explores the need for more formal instruction of ethics with speech-language pathology graduate students.
  • Describe three different methods of instruction for formal ethics training with speech-language pathology graduate students.
  • Explain how to apply a provided framework of formal ethics training to a speech-language pathology graduate program.
  • Full-Time Field Placements for Part-time Students: Implications for Diversity in Speech-Language Pathology (.05 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Posters 1

    Location
    Grand Ballroom Foyer
    Speakers
    • Erasmia Benakis M.A., CCC-SLP - Director of Field Placement Programs/Associate Program Director
      Erasmia Benakis, CCC-SLP is the Associate Program Director and Director of Field Placement Program for both the residential and online modalities at New York University's Communicative Sciences and Disorders Department. She has extensive experience in the area of supervision. Prior to working at New York University, Erasmia worked with individuals across the lifespan in both medical and educational settings.
    • maria Michelle Fareri, M.S., CCC-SLP, TSSLD-BE - Field Placement Administrator
      Maria Michelle Fareri, MS, CCC-SLP, TSSLD-BE is a Clinical Field Placement Administrator for NYU's Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders. As a bilingual speech-language pathologist, Maria’s clinical focus has been with pediatric populations. She has worked with various clinical populations within NYC and Los Angeles providing services in school, private practice, and early intervention home care settings. She also has experience supervising graduate student clinicians in their field placement experiences.
    • Olivia Blake, M.S., CCC-SLP - Field Placement and Enrollment Administrator
      Olivia Blake, MS, CCC-SLP is an Enrollment and Field Placement Administrator at New York University.
    Summary
    Speech-language pathology is a homogeneous field, composed of 90% white females. Graduate CSD programs must emphasize diversity with respect to age, race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status while providing all students with equitable opportunities to earn income and maintain personal needs while enrolled. Some programs offer part-time status, which is appealing to BIPOC and nontraditional students. However, it is difficult to maintain this status, as most field placements require full-time schedules. This poster presentation will address the challenges part-time students face when transitioning to full-time placements and the need for part-time placement opportunities to support licensure and certification requirements.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Discuss the rationale for Black Indigenous and People of Color and non-traditional students electing to participate in distance education and/or part-time programs.
  • Recognize the need for part-time field placements based on profession and student demographics to facilitate student outcomes and increase diversity.
  • Evaluate the implications part-time field placements may have on direct contact hour accrual and length in program.
  • Hearing the Voices of Black Students in an Undergraduate Speech-Language Pathology/Audiology Program (.05 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Posters 1

    Location
    Galleria Ballroom
    Speakers
    • Allison Sauerwein, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor
      Allison Sauerwein, PhD, CCC-SLP, is an assistant professor in the department of Applied Health at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. She teaches courses in AAC and pediatric speech and language disorders. Her research focuses on teaching and learning and aims to improve preservice education for speech-language pathologists.
    • Kathryn Brady, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Kathryn Brady, PhD, CCC-SLP is an Associate Professor in the Department of Applied Health at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. She teaches courses in child speech and language development and disorders, and cultural competence. Her research focuses on early language development and disorders and multicultural issues in language assessment and treatment.
    Summary
    There is a clear need for increased diversity among practicing speech-language pathologists, audiologists and researchers. However, speech-language pathology/audiology students from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups can face unique challenges in their undergraduate programs. This poster will present the results of a pilot study exploring the experiences of individuals who identify as racial minorities and are studying in a majority white speech-language pathology/audiology program. Themes will center on (1) difficulties unique to minority students, (2) strategies and resources that students use to deal with difficult situations, and (3) recommendations for faculty about how to better support and retain minority students.>br>
    Learning Objectives:
  • List 3 challenges that are unique to undergraduate SLP students from underrepresented groups.
  • Identify 3 strategies that underrepresented students utilize to ensure success in their undergraduate SLP program.
  • Summarize aspects of an undergraduate SLP program that facilitate and hinder the success of underrepresented students.
  • Partnering with Purpose: Speech Pathology & Social Work Team to Treat Aphasia (.05 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Posters 1

    Location
    Galleria Ballroom
    Speakers
    • Jenna Addington, MSW, LISW-S - Field Placement Coordinator
      Jenna Addington, MSW, LISW-S, is a Field Placement Specialist, Community Lecturer, & Social Work Student Supervisor at The Ohio State University, College of Social Work. She received her BSW from Ohio University in 2008 and received her MSW from George Mason University in 2010. In addition to her current roles at OSU, Jenna is a mental health therapist and has previous experience in community mental health including integrated healthcare settings.
    • Jennifer Brello, M.Ed., CCC-SLP - Clinical Associate Professor
      Jennifer Brello, MEd., CCC-SLP is a Clinical Associate Professor at the Ohio State University and the Director of the OSU Aphasia Initiative. She is a clinical supervisor, course instructor, and academic advisor. She has over 20 years of experience supporting adults who have experienced acquired brain injury. Jennifer's clinical and research interests are in supportive communication, service learning, and interprofessional practice and education.
    Summary
    Interprofessional collaboration has been shown to optimize patient care and outcomes. The benefits of interprofessional learning experiences in graduate programs has been widely reported. This poster will outline a framework for creating interprofessional partnerships between speech-language pathology and social work graduate students within a university clinic aphasia program. Implications for student supervision will be discussed along with client and program-level outcomes.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Describe a framework for creating interprofessional partnerships within a university clinic aphasia program.
  • Describe a structure for clinical faculty in speech-language pathology to provide education and supervision to students in social work programs.
  • List the benefits of partnerships in speech pathology and social work for students and persons with aphasia.
  • Simulating an End-of-Life Care Conference Using Standardized Patients (.05 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Posters 1

    Location
    Grand Ballroom Foyer
    Speakers
    • Amanda Stead, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Amanda Stead, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is an associate professor at Pacific University in Oregon. She teaches courses in Communication and Aging, Aphasia, Progressive Neurological Disorders, and Counseling. Her research is in the area of language change in healthy aging and dementia evidenced based education, and end-of-life care.
    • Caitlyn Fitzgerald, M.S. - Director of Clinical Education
      Caitlin FItzgerald is the Director of Clinical Education at Pacific University in the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders. In addition to her background and passion for clinical education, she has experience in pediatric medical settings with a special focus on feeding and swallowing disorders.
    • Melissa Fryer, M.A. - Clinical Faculty
      Melissa Fryer MA, CCC-SLP (she/her) is clinical faculty at Pacific University. Melissa supervises graduate student clinicians in the Pacific University Psychology and Comprehensive Health Clinics and teaches graduate Seminar courses. She coordinates a foundational interprofessional course in Pacific's College of Health Professions focused on equity, diversity and inclusion, and manages an online Clinical Supervisor training course for the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders.
    • Monica Vinson, M.S. - Research Assistant
      Monica Vinson, M.S., CCC-SLP, is a medical speech-language pathologist at Mason General Hospital in Shelton, Washington. Her areas of interest include gerontology, progressive neurologic disorders, patient advocacy, and facilitating end-of-life care conversations.
    • Sara Henry, M.S. - Research Assistant
      Sara Henry MS, CCC-SLP is an ASHA certified, Oregon, North Carolina, and Rhode Island licensed speech-language pathologist working in acute, post-acute and long term care medical settings with a passion for the geriatic population and specializing in evaluating, diagnosing, and treating cognitive, speech, voice, language and swallowing disorders.
    Summary
    Students often need the opportunity to develop skills associated with clinical care conferences, such as describing one's own roles and responsibilities, presenting relevant evidence, and communicating with interprofessional teammates and family members. Simulation provides an opportunity to have students practice and demonstrate these skills in a safe environment. Students took part in an end-of-life care conference simulation using trained standardized patients in the roles of the medical doctor and a family member. Students were evaluated on their interprofessional and communication skills through rubrics by the primary supervising educators and the standardized patients. Data outcomes from the simulation will be presented.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Explain the simulation design process and the assessments used for simulation evaluation.
  • Discuss the outcomes of the simulation from both a student learning perspective and a student perspective.
  • Describe the benefits of using a standardized patient for simulating a clinical care conference.
  • SLP Graduate Students and Otolaryngology – Collaborative Opportunities to Enhance Student Learning (.05 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Posters 1

    Location
    Galleria Ballroom
    Speakers
    • Lisa LaGorio, PhD, MPH, CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor/Acting Program Director
      Dr. LaGorio is an Assistant Professor, acting SLP Program Director, active clinician, teacher, and researcher. Her current research includes studying aging effects on swallowing physiology, and developing novel protocols for dysphagia evaluation, prevention, and rehabilitation. Her current non-clinical/education-related research includes studying the effectiveness of inter-professional education and technology-based simulation modalities for teaching clinical decision making skills in graduate student curricula.
    • Shannon Theis, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor
      Shannon M. Theis, Ph.D, is an Assistant Professor with the Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences at Rush University in Chicago, IL. Dr. Theis has specialized in caring for children with feeding/swallowing difficulties, voice and resonance disorders, and craniofacial anomalies/cleft lip and palate for 20+ years. Dr. Theis is an active clinical researcher, educator, and presenter and has published several articles related to pediatric voice and feeding disorders.
    Summary
    The MS in SLP program at Rush University is housed within the Rush University Medical Center which provides our graduate students unique opportunities to collaborate with, and learn from, multiple different physician specialties including neurology, physiatry, and otolaryngology. This poster focuses specifically on enhanced student learning opportunities through collaboration with the division of otolaryngology. Otolaryngologists routinely guest lecture in SLP courses; allow students to observe surgeries (phono, trans-oral robotic, laryngectomy); mentor students in clinics (laryngology, head/neck cancer, craniofacial); conduct clinical research with students; and serve on student thesis committees, all of which significantly enhance student learning.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Describe how the Rush University SLP graduate training program provides meaningful collaboration opportunities with the division of otolaryngology.
  • Explain approaches in which physicians can contribute to SLP education in the classroom.
  • Develop novel ways of participating with physician partners to enhance SLP student learning.
  • A Cutting Edge Approach to Developing Clinical Competencies and Improving Documentation Skills (.1CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Lunch 1

    Speakers
    • Lana Fox - CEO
      Lana Fox, CEO of ClinicNote loves collaborating with therapists who are passionate about their profession. She received her degree in Industrial Design from Iowa State University where her background equips her to streamline customer and potential customer feedback into an effective software solution.
    Summary
    Many CSD programs have embraced simulation as a technique for improving students' clinical skills. Additionally, these programs have recognized the value of having students document and practice technical writing while utilizing an EMR system. This session will describe a pilot program at a university clinic that combined simulation-based education with an EMR system. This allowed students to practice documentation skills following the completion of four simulations. The benefits of providing this integrated approach will be presented, implementation strategies will be discussed, outcome data from faculty and student surveys will be reviewed and opportunities for future research will be described.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Summarize the benefits of combining simulation-based education with an EMR system in a university training program.
  • Analyze outcome data from faculty and student surveys following the pilot study.
  • Develop opportunities for future and expanded research.
  • Embracing Transformational Leadership Opportunities in Communication Sciences and Disorders (.1 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Lunch 1

    Speakers
    • Ann Eddins, Ph.D., M.B.A. - Professor
      Ann Clock Eddins, Ph.D., M.B.A., CCC-A is a Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, co-director of the Auditory & Speech Sciences Laboratory at the University of South Florida, and adjunct faculty at Mahidol University Faculty of Medicine in Bangkok, Thailand. She is the immediate Past President of CAPCSD.
    • Don Nielsen, Ph.D. - Director
      Nielsen has been Director, Audiology Clinic, and Translational Research at Northwestern University and Professor and Chair of Speech and Hearing Department Washington University, Saint Louis. Don has led various hearing research institutes. As Fuel Medical Group’s Audiology University Advisor, he consults with several universities.
    Summary
    Now, more than ever, CSD needs leaders to champion and transform our profession. Leaders provide direction for needed change and align, motivate, and inspire others to embrace the opportunities accompanying change. But, as leadership becomes more critical, it also becomes more complex. The transition into leadership roles is challenging, and new leaders are often quickly overwhelmed and uncertain. Here, we organize, clarify, and condense a vast array of information on leadership to guide those developing and improving their leadership skills and those mentoring new leaders. We aim to reduce uncertainty and demystify the path to leadership in CSD.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Define what a leader is and the traits and characteristics of exceptional transformational leaders.
  • Recognize the important role that trust plays in leadership and change management.
  • Summarize the principles of change leadership and differentiate management from leadership roles.
  • Understanding the Culture of your Program: Introducing the Intercultural Development Continuum (IDC) (.1 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Lunch 1

    Speakers
    • Jayne Brandel, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Chair/Associated Professor
      Jayne Brandel is an Associate Professor and Chair of the CSD Department at West Virginia University. As an ASHA-certified speech-language pathologist, her research interests are focused on increasing the use of research-based activities in the evaluation and treatment of language-based disorders in schools. Additionally, she has begun to explore effective clinical instructional practices at the university level as well as regarding professional development activities.
    • Maya Reynolds Clark, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor/Program Director
      Maya Reynolds Clark, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is an associate professor and program director for Communication Sciences and Disorders at Georgia Southern University. As director of the LEADS lab, she focuses on cultural factors in communication and cognition, implicit bias, social cognitive theory and clinical education. As an Office of Inclusive Excellence Senior Faculty Fellow, Dr. Clark is dedicated to using her expertise to assist families from diverse cultures and marginalized backgrounds.
    Summary
    In the wake of glaring and longstanding social injustices as well as historical underrepresentation of CSD professionals from marginalized communities, academic programs are challenged to move out of a state of complacency to actively assess the ways in which we manage diversity, equity, inclusion (DEI), justice, and belonging (JB). This session will offer approaches to better understand the culture and cultural wellness of your CSD program as well as how to interpret experiences around them from an intercultural perspective.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Discuss the historical aspects of issues relative to DEI and JB in CSD programs.
  • Examine the impact of social injustice on educational experiences.
  • Identify how program experiences would be perceived by those from different cultures.
  • Describe ways to better understand the cultural wellness of one’s own program.
  • Diversifying the Master’s Cohort: Putting Admissions Best Practices into Action (.15 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Concurrent Sessions B

    Location
    Skyline II
    Speakers
    • Jennifer Meyer, M.S. CCC-SLP - Director of Clinical Education
      Jennifer Meyer is the Director of Clinical Education at the University of Oregon working with diverse students, clients, and colleagues. She actively engages in social justice/advocacy work in her workplace and community. Jennifer's other interest areas include gender-affirming communication services and clinical training and mentoring clinical educators.
    • Samantha Shune, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor/Program Director
      Samantha Shune, PhD, CCC-SLP is an Associate Professor at the University of Oregon. As the current Director of the Communication Disorders and Sciences Program, she has helped guide programmatic efforts targeting diversity, equity, and inclusion, including centering the program’s current two-year strategic plan on anti-racism. Her research interests also include the effects of aging on the physiologic and social aspects of the swallowing and mealtime processes.
    Summary
    Increasing the numbers of practicing speech and language professionals from traditionally underrepresented groups has been hampered by rigid, academic-achievement-focused admissions processes across master’s programs. With a goal of diversifying our incoming master’s cohort, the admissions team looked more broadly at the characteristics, qualities, and skills that make a successful CSD student. Drawing on established best practices, the University of Oregon transformed our admissions application and review process, refocusing on a wider range of experiences, increasing transparency, diving deeper into emerging critical thinking, and more explicitly addressing our implicit biases. Development, implementation, and admissions cycle results will be presented.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Identify three areas of the traditional admissions process that can be problematic for underrepresented students.
  • Explain two examples of broadening admissions criteria to be inclusive of a wider range of experiences.
  • Describe two strategies for reducing the impact of implicit bias in admissions decisions.
  • Models of Evaluating Clinical Knowledge and Skills Across the Curriculum: Panel Discussion (.15 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Concurrent Sessions B

    Location
    Pavillion West
    Speakers
    • Anne Hogan, M.S., Ph.D., CCC-A - Associate Professor
      Anne E. Hogan, MS, Ph.D., CCC-A, (she, her, hers) is an Associate Professor in the Pacific University School of Audiology. Dr. Hogan uses her clinical degree (SMSU, 2002) and her classroom and clinical experiences from multiple institutions to teach across clinical, didactic, and experiential courses in the accelerated AuD program with 25+ students/cohort. These experiences also mold her service positions and research within the department, and beyond.
    • Debra Schober-Peterson, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-CL - Clinical Professor/Director of Clinical Education
    • Johanna R. Price, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Johanna Price, PhD, CCC-SLP is Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Western Carolina University in Cullowhee, NC. Her interests include oral and written language development, assessment, and intervention for children and adolescents with a variety of backgrounds, including those with neurodevelopmental disabilities, typical development, and culturally diverse backgrounds. Her interests also encompass interprofessional education and practice. She has authored over 25 publications and 60 presentations.
    Summary
    There are a variety of models (e.g., capstone project, thesis, competency exams, clinical portfolios) graduate programs in CSD use to evaluate student clinical knowledge and skills. These models are best applied when aligned with the program’s curriculum and department priorities (e.g., research, clinical, academic). This panel will discuss successful implementation of these models in AuD and SLP graduate programs.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Identify models for evaluating knowledge and skills.
  • Align models with program curriculum and priorities.
  • Review and discuss a variety of successful examples applied in programs.
  • Problem Solving and Information Exchange: Interviewing Processes for Facilitating Holistic Admissions in Graduate Programs (.15 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Concurrent Sessions B

    Location
    Pavillion East
    Speakers
    • Christine Carmichael Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Professor/Graduate Program Coordinator
      Christine Carmichael, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is professor and graduate program coordinator for the Woolfolk School of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Our Lady of the Lake University. She also serves on the CAPCSD Admissions Committee and chairs the CAPCSD Admissions Resource Subcommittee. Her clinical, teaching, and research interests focus on voice and swallowing disorders.
    • Douglas F. Parham, Ph.D. CCC-SLP - Chair/Program Director
      Douglas F. Parham, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is the Chair and Program Director of the Department of CSD at Wichita State University. He is the SLP representative for Kansas on ASHA's Committee of Ambassadors and a Site Visitor for ASHA's Council on Academic Accreditation. He is a member of CAPCSD's CSDCAS Committee. He is a Past President of the Kansas Speech-Language-Hearing Association and the Council of State Speech-Language-Hearing Association Presidents.
    • Erin Burns, Au.D., CCC-A - Clinic Director
    • Karen Villanueva, M.S., CCC-SLP, BCS-S - Undergraduate Program Coordinator
    Summary
    Graduate programs face difficult decisions regarding whom to admit with many qualified applicants and limited number of seats. Admissions processes differ across programs, but few include an interview. Programs wonder about the added benefit of an interview on the selection process; however, some applicants who seem to be a perfect match on paper are not! This session will include open discussion of holistic review and the role of interviews for CSD graduate admissions including interview processes currently being used at four different programs. Insight regarding benefits, deterrents, feedback, time, effort, and outcomes for programs will be part of the conversation.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Describe at least two processes to conduct interviews for graduate admissions at their institution.
  • Compare and contrast benefits and deterrents of using interviews for graduate admissions.
  • Make informed decisions to support conducting interviews in their respective programs as a part of graduate admissions.
  • SoTL: Choose Your Own Adventure! (.15 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Concurrent Sessions B

    Location
    Skyline II
    Speakers
    • Colleen Visconti, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Professor/Program Director
      Colleen F. Visconti is Professor and Program Director of Speech-Language Pathology at Baldwin Wallace University. She is the Editor and co-founder of Teaching and Learning in Communication Sciences & Disorders; co-author of Evidence-based education in the classroom: Examples from clinical disciplines; and Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology: Evidence-Based Education. Her research focuses on service-oriented study abroad, peer review and peer mentoring, and evidence-based educational practices.
    • Jennifer Friberg Ed.D. - Interim Director, Center for Teaching, Learning and Technology and Cross Endowed Chair in SoTL
      Jennifer C. Friberg (Ed.D., CCC-SLP, ASHA Fellow) is the Interim Director for the Center for Teaching, Learning & Technology, Cross Endowed Chair for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, and a Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Illinois State University. She is the founding Associate Editor for Teaching and Learning in Communication Sciences & Disorders and is the co-editor of Evidence-Based Education in the Classroom: Examples from Clinical Disciplines.
    • Joann Benigno, Ph.D. - Associate Professor/Director of CSD
      Joann P. Benigno, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is an Associate Professor and the Director of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Ohio Unversity. Her primary research interests include examining the links between social cognition, language, and cognitive abilities in children with and without communication disorders. Teaching interests include child language development and disorders. Scholarship of teaching and learning foci involve training students to work with autistic and their families through community outreach programming.
    • Kerry Mandulak, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Kerry Callahan Mandulak, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is associate professor and chair of the graduate admissions committee in the School of Communication Sciences & Disorders at Pacific University. Her research program focuses on investigating the feasibility and methods of implementing holistic review for graduate admissions. She presents nationally within the discipline and adjacent disciplines in order to pursue her goal of continuing the national conversation around this important work.
    • Mark DeRuiter, M.B.A., Ph.D., CCC-A/SLP - Professor
      Mark DeRuiter MBA, PhD, is Professor and Director of the Clinical Science Doctorate in Speech-Language Pathology at the University of Pittsburgh. He has held varied higher education CSD roles including clinic director, graduate program director, and associate department head. He has a long history of classroom teaching. Mark serves on the CAPCSD Board as well as the Founding Editorial Board of Teaching and Learning in Communication Sciences and Disorders.
    • Sarah Ginsberg, Ed.D., CCC-SLP - Professor
      Sarah M. Ginsberg, Ed.D., CCC-SLP, F-ASHA is a full professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Eastern Michigan University. She was the founding Editor of Teaching and Learning in Communication Sciences & Disorders. She is also the Editor of Xerostomia: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Managing Dry Mouth (Slack Publishing) and Co-Editor of Evidence-Based Education in the Classroom (Slack Publishing).
    Summary
    Engaging with the scholarship of teaching and learning is an exciting prospect. Some of us have our research up-and-running. Others are pulling together ideas or switching gears. Join us for a session that serves novice to expert. Participants will engage with a short calibrating lecture and then will have the option to rotate to different stations to discuss: 1) Where to start, 2) How to refine ideas, 3) How to address issues with data collection/analysis, 4) Considerations for disseminating your work. Bring along your thoughts, ideas, and data! Your colleagues and experts are ready to discuss your questions.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Define the scholarship of teaching and learning.
  • List two ways to study the scholarship of teaching and learning in the classroom.
  • Conduct research in the scholarship of teaching and learning at their home institution.
  • The Impact of the Non-traditional Student on CSD Programs (.15 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Concurrent Sessions B

    Location
    Broadway I/II/III
    Speakers
    • Erica Friedland, AuD - Chair/Associate Professor
      Erica Friedland, AuD is Chair and Associate Professor of the Department of Audiology in the Dr. Pallavi Patel College of Health Care Sciences at Nova Southeastern University. Her areas of interest include pediatric audiology, auditory processing, neuroscience, student clinical assessment, and preceptor roles. Dr. Friedland is the Chair of the Academic Programs Committee of the American Academy of Audiology and past board member of the Accreditation Commission for Audiology Education.
    • Melissa Edrich, Ed.D., CCC/SLP - Chair/Associate Professor
      Melissa Edrich, EdD, CCC/SLP is an associate professor and Department Chair/Director of the Master of Science Program in Speech-Language Pathology at Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Melissa has been an active participant in FLASHA for the past 25 years and served as President 2010-2011. Melissa also served two three-year terms on the ASHA SLP Advisory Council 2012-2018 and is currently serving as the Associate Coordinator for SIG 11.
    Summary
    Non-traditional students are commonly thought of as students pursuing a second career or degree. Additionally, this group may also include first-generation college students, parents, veterans, and students working full-time. These students bring experiences that can add diversity to a cohort of CSD students. They can also face unique challenges that differ from that of traditional students. This session will offer opportunities for collaborative discussions on how to best support these students throughout the program.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Discuss the various types of non-traditional students.
  • Identify the benefits of non-traditional students participating in CSD programs.
  • Describe strategies to overcome barriers associated with non-traditional students and that yield successful completion of graduate training.
  • Welcome to Our Program! Orientation for New Faculty (.15 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Concurrent Sessions B

    Location
    Forum Suite
    Speakers
    • Shubha Kashinath, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor/Chair
      Shubha Kashinath is an Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Speech Language and Hearing Sciences at Cal State East Bay. Her professional and research interests focus on autism, caregiver implemented interventions, and implementation research. She has over 15 years of experience serving individuals with disabilities and their families in early intervention, school, and higher education settings.
    Summary
    There are a number of things new faculty members need to know in order to successfully integrate into an existing CSD program. It is important to provide education and mentoring to facilitate a successful transition. CSD programs also need to make these new members feel like a part of the team from the beginning. This session will cover some nuts and bolts to launch a new faculty member into the program.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Create a top ten list of must-know items for new faculty on day one.
  • Identify strategies to include new faculty members into a CSD program.
  • Identify opportunities for continued mentorship of new faculty members during the first year.
  • x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S6)

    4/21/2022 Concurrent Sessions B

    Location
    No Room

    Achieving a Diverse and Talented Applicant Pool via Holistic Recruitment Strategies (.15 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Concurrent Sessions C

    Location
    Skyline I
    Speakers
    • Carol Cokely, Ph.D. - AuD Program Head
      Carol Cokely, Ph.D. is a Clinical Professor and Program Head of the Doctor of Audiology program i at the University of Texas at Dallas. She earned a bachelor’s degree from Queens College of the City University of New York, a master’s degree from Northwestern University, and her PhD from Indiana University. Research and project development interests include clinical education and program assessment and outcomes.
    • Jackie Clark, Ph.D. - Clinical Professor
      Dr. Jackie Clark is a Clinical Professor at UT Dallas where she teaches a variety of didactic, clinically experiential and as well as provision of clinical services. She is appointed a Research Scholar with The University of the Witwatersrand School of Speech and Hearing Therapy in Johannesburg, South Africa, and consults with WHO Division of Deafness and Hearing Loss and is a Past President of the American Academy of Audiology.
    • Linda Thibodeau, Ph.D. - Professor
      Dr. Linda Thibodeau is a professor at the University of Texas at Dallas and directs the Hearing Health Lab (www.utdallas.edu/hhlab). With dual certification in audiology and speech-language pathology, she is known for her work on speech recognition in noise, auditory training, and assistive technology for persons with hearing loss. Her research on wireless technology has led to the development of best practices for fitting and verification of remote microphone systems.
    • Ross Roeser, Ph.D. - Professor
    • Scott Griffiths, Ph.D. - Clinical Professor
      Scott Griffiths is Clinical Professor in the department of Speech, Language, and Hearing at the University of Texas at Dallas. Dr. Griffiths received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois. He has been a frequent attendee and presenter at the annual CAPCSD meetings since 1996.
    Summary
    UT Dallas’ AuD admissions committee created and implemented guidelines to recognize and embrace a broader range of applicant experiences and attributes while adjusting metrics for traditional quantitative measures (e.g., Rosenkrantz et al, 2021). Updated guidelines weighted strengths in research, community engagement, and heavy science preparation and considered first-generation college, hardships, education in rural area, and other life experiences. Applicants reaching a benchmark rating were then invited for structured interview. The changes in admission offers and incoming classes will be reviewed. Systematic recruitment outreach, funding sources that mitigate attendance barriers, and programs to enhance retention must complement updated recruitment metrics.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Identify disparities in racial/ethnic landscape in hearing and speech-language practitioners and education.
  • Identify attributes and experience supplements to standard quantitative measures to enhance a diverse applicant pool.
  • Identify barriers and facilitative strategies that impact acceptance and retention of diverse student cohorts.
  • Audiology & Speech-language Pathology Interstate Compact: Connecting Patients and Providers Across States (.15 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Concurrent Sessions C

    Location
    Forum Suite
    Speakers
    • Dan Logsdon - Director, National Center for Intersate Compacts
      Dan Logsdon is the Director of the National Center for Interstate Compacts at The Council of State Governments. Previously, Logsdon was Vice Chair of Kentucky's Public Service Commission. He served as Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear’s deputy chief of staff and as Assistant Kentucky State Treasurer. He served as vice president for external affairs at Alltel Communications and Windstream Communications. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Murray State University.
    • Susan Adams, Esq., CAE - Director, State Legislative & Regulatory Affairs
      Susan Adams is the Director for State Legislative and Regulatory Affairs at ASHA. She advances ASHA's public policy objectives as team lead and policy expert on state legislation and regulations affecting speech-language pathologists, audiologists and consumers. Susan received her bachelor’s degree from Towson University and her juris doctor from the University of Baltimore, School of Law. Susan holds the Certified Association Executive designation by the American Society of Association Executives.
    Summary
    Audiologists and speech-language pathologists need to acquire a license to practice in each state. The Audiology & Speech-Language Pathology Interstate Compact (ASLP-IC) was created to improve efficiencies in service delivery within the compact states without the need to acquire separate licenses in each state. This session will review current and past inefficiencies, the future plans of the ASLP-IC, and how it will benefit telehealth practices in particular.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Describe recent innovations in telehealth in CSD fields and benefits to patients.
  • Discuss the current limitations in provision of healthcare across state lines.
  • Describe the purpose of the ASLP-IC, its current status, and how it might benefit telehealth practices in the future.
  • Equity and Inclusion in CDS Academic Programs: Focus on Instruction and Scholarship (.15 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Concurrent Sessions C

    Location
    Skyline II
    Speakers
    • Danai Kasambira Fannin, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Danai Kasambira Fannin PhD, CCC-SLP, is an associate professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at North Carolina Central University, Co-Chair of CAPCSD’s Diversity Equity and Inclusion committee, and member of CAPCSD's Admissions committee. She is a Speech-Language Pathologist with research interests in culturally responsive practice, interdisciplinary communication intervention for children with developmental disabilities, and determinants of access to autism services for children in underserved and rural areas.
    • Jamila Harley, M.Ed., CCC-SLP - Associate Director of Health Care Services
      Jamila Harley, M.Ed., CCC-SLP is an Associate Director for Healthcare Services in Speech-Language Pathology with ASHA. Jamila currently serves as Co-Editor for the National Black Association for Speech-Language and Hearing's national publication. She is passionate about recruitment, retention, and leadership development of Black students in the field of Communication Sciences and Disorders. Her interests also include increased interest, access, and representation of Black SLPs in healthcare settings.
    • Jean-Franco Rivera Pérez, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor
      Jean-Franco Rivera-Pérez, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Texas Christian University. His academic interest and areas of expertise include the use of technology to promote vocabulary in bilingual (Spanish/English) preschool children with and without language disorder. Other areas of expertise include bilingual development, biliteracy, vocabulary intervention/instruction, assessment and treatment of bilingual (Spanish/English) preschool children, and social justice.
    • Jennifer Simpson, AuD, CCC-A - Clinical Professor/Associate Head
      Jennifer M. Simpson is a Clinical Professor and Associate Head in the Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences Department at Purdue University. She currently serves as the Vice President of Organizational Advancement on the CAPCSD Board of Directors. Her clinical interests include clinical education, pediatric diagnostic audiology and intervention, and administration.
    • Kerry Mandulak, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Kerry Callahan Mandulak, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is associate professor and chair of the graduate admissions committee in the School of Communication Sciences & Disorders at Pacific University. Her research program focuses on investigating the feasibility and methods of implementing holistic review for graduate admissions. She presents nationally within the discipline and adjacent disciplines in order to pursue her goal of continuing the national conversation around this important work.
    • Nidhi Mahendra, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Professor/Chairperson
      Nidhi Mahendra, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is Professor and Chair of the department of Communicative Disorders and Sciences. An active teacher-scholar, leader, and multilingual SLP, her areas of expertise are in JEDI (Justice, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion), adult neurogenic language disorders, healthy aging, and the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL).
    • Teresa Girolamo, Ph.D. - Postdoctoral Trainee
      Teresa Girolamo, Ph.D., is a T32 Postdoctoral Training Fellow in the Cognitive Neuroscience of Communication at the University of Connecticut (CNC-CT). Her research addresses: 1) how underlying mechanisms influence real-time processing in autistic youth with language impairment; 2) how systemic factors (e.g., social determinants of health) plus individual differences (e.g., language ability) influence outcomes in autistic youth. To pursue this work, Teresa uses community-based methods and works with BIPOC communities.
    Summary
    The purpose of this session is to operationalize the constructs of equity and inclusion within academic programs of communicative sciences and disorders. Equity and inclusion are directly revealed in program policies and practices, student perceptions, departmental culture, and institutional climate. The presenters will emphasize best practices and missed opportunities in nurturing an equitable environment for effective instruction as well as for nurturing faculty scholarship. Our perspectives come from diverse vantage points in CSD, from recent graduates to faculty who have been instructors and researchers for decades, as well as representing culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Define operationally the constructs of equity and inclusion.
  • Identify indices and metrics of equity and inclusion in academic programs in communicative sciences and disorders.
  • Explain the rationale and evidence-based practice for at least 3 equity-minded strategies to nurture effective instruction and faculty scholarship.
  • Problem Solving and Information Exchange: Connecting Clinic Directors (.15 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Concurrent Sessions C

    Location
    Pavillion East
    Speakers
    • Devon Weist, AuD, CCC-A - Clinic Director - Audiology
      Devon Weist, Au.D. CCC-A is a Clinical Instructor and Director of the Hearing Clinic at the University of South Florida. In addition to managing the clinic, she coordinates clinical practicums, supervises students in adult diagnostic practicums, and teaches Advanced Amplification, Counseling Across the Lifespan, and Medical Audiology courses in the AuD program. Dr. Weist currently serves on the American Academy of Audiology Board of Directors.
    • Teresa Anthony, MHA, M.A., CCC-SLP - Clinic Director, Speech-Language Clinic and Bolesta Center
      Teresa Anthony, MHA, MA, CCC-SLP is a Clinical Instructor and Speech Clinic Director at the University of South Florida and a PhD student in Public Health with a concentration in Health Services Research.She is a member of ASHA and FLASHA Medicaid committees and alumnus of ASHA’s 2018 Healthcare LDP and CAPCSD's 2019 Leadership Academy. Teresa aims to apply data-driven, real-world clinical operations approaches in a university clinical setting.
    Summary
    This facilitated session provides an opportunity for Clinic Directors to discuss mentoring clinical supervisors, developing clinical grading rubrics, and increasing community partnerships. Questions will be addressed with an opportunity for group problem solving and information sharing to facilitate innovative approaches.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Identify characteristics of positive mentoring Clinic Directors can apply towards new clinical faculty.
  • Discuss elements of clinical grading rubrics to include competencies representing program accreditation and professional certification standards.
  • Develop strategies to apply for clinical placement expansion.
  • Problem Solving and Information Exchange: Connecting Department Chairs (.15 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Concurrent Sessions C

    Location
    Pavillion West
    Speakers
    • Peggy Blake, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Professor/Chair
      Margaret (Peggy) Lehman Blake, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is a Professor and Chair of the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Houston. Her research focuses on cognitive-communication disorders associated with right hemisphere brain damage (RHD). She is the author of The Right Hemisphere and Disorders of Cognition and Communication and the co-creator of RightHemisphere.org. She is co-author of Clinical Neuroscience for Communication Disorders: Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology.
    • Tiffany Johnson, Ph.D. - Chair/Associate Professor
      Tiffany A. Johnson, Ph.D. CCC-A, Associate Professor, serves as the Doughty-Kemp Chair of the Hearing and Speech Department, University of Kansas Medical Center. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Iowa and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Boys Town National Research Hospital. Her research interests include otoacoustic emission and evoked-potential measurements, early identification of hearing loss, and noise-induced auditory pathology.
    Summary
    This facilitated session provides an opportunity for department chairs to acclimate and discuss issues related to their position. Topics include curriculum mapping, developing admission strategies, and providing feedback to faculty. Questions will be addressed with an opportunity for group problem solving and information sharing to facilitate innovative approaches.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Discuss role in curriculum mapping.
  • Describe various strategies for admissions.
  • Describe two (2) strategies for providing feedback to faculty.
  • The Americans with Disabilities Act: Creating an Accessible Learning Environment (.15 CEUs)

    4/21/2022 Concurrent Sessions C

    Location
    Broadway I/II/III
    Speakers
    • Lindsey Jorgensen, AuD, Ph.D. - Associate Professor/Audiologist
      Lindsey Jorgensen is an Associate Professor at the University of South Dakota where she also serves as the Chair for the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders as well as the Clinic Director for the USD Speech and Hearing Clinics. She is also a clinical supervisor and has a research interest in the interaction between cognition and cognitive changes, hearing loss, and hearing assistive technology.
    Summary
    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was designed to ensure students have equal access to academic opportunities. The rights afforded to postsecondary students under the ADA will be described, as well as the responsibilities of the student. Illustrative examples will be presented that will enable attendees to critically analyze the success (or lack thereof) of different student accommodations.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Describe the rights of students under the Americans with Disabilities Act.
  • Discuss the students’ responsibility in regards to attainment of accommodations.
  • Implement student accommodations in CSD learning environments.
  • x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S7)

    4/21/2022 Concurrent Sessions C

    Location
    No Room

    Honors and Awards Reception

    4/21/2022 Honors & Awards

    Location
    Atrium Ballroom

    x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S8)

    4/21/2022 Honors & Awards

    Location
    No Room

    Laying the Foundations for Teaching and Learning: Connecting Principles to Application (.15 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Plenary 2

    Location
    Pavilion Ballroom
    Speakers
    • Jennifer Friberg Ed.D. - Interim Director, Center for Teaching, Learning and Technology and Cross Endowed Chair in SoTL
      Jennifer C. Friberg (Ed.D., CCC-SLP, ASHA Fellow) is the Interim Director for the Center for Teaching, Learning & Technology, Cross Endowed Chair for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, and a Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Illinois State University. She is the founding Associate Editor for Teaching and Learning in Communication Sciences & Disorders and is the co-editor of Evidence-Based Education in the Classroom: Examples from Clinical Disciplines.
    • Mark DeRuiter, M.B.A., Ph.D., CCC-A/SLP - Professor
      Mark DeRuiter MBA, PhD, is Professor and Director of the Clinical Science Doctorate in Speech-Language Pathology at the University of Pittsburgh. He has held varied higher education CSD roles including clinic director, graduate program director, and associate department head. He has a long history of classroom teaching. Mark serves on the CAPCSD Board as well as the Founding Editorial Board of Teaching and Learning in Communication Sciences and Disorders.
    Summary
    Faculty in CSD programs are expected to teach, often with limited training in pedagogy. Research exists regarding adult learning, pedagogical approaches, and student outcomes. Adult learning principles are critical to successful teaching and student learning. This session will focus on inclusive academic and clinical pedagogy in CSD

    Learning Objectives:
  • Identify pedagogical models in higher education.
  • Describe adult learning principles and their relationships to student outcomes.
  • List strategies for implementation into academic and clinical coursework.
  • x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S9)

    4/22/2022 Plenary 2

    Location
    No Room

    Mentoring Faculty of Color for Success in CSD (.15 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Concurrent Sessions D

    Location
    Forum Suite
    Speakers
    • Maria Munoz, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Professor
      Maria L. Muñoz, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is Professor at the University of Redlands. She received her doctorate from the University of Texas as a participant in the Multicultural Leadership Training Program. She conducts research, teaches, and publishes in the areas of treatment aphasia in Spanish/English bilinguals and multicultural issues in communication sciences and disorders.
    • RaMonda Horton, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Dr. RaMonda Horton, Ph.D, CCC-SLP is an Associate Professor in the Speech-language Pathology program at Midwestern University in Downers Grove, IL. Her research and teaching interests are in the areas of early language development, childhood communication disorders, social justice and multicultural issues in communication sciences and disorders
    • Valerie Johnson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence
      Valerie Johnson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Emerson College. Her areas of specialization include child language acquisition and its disorders with an emphasis on children who speak the dialect of African American English.
    Summary
    The authors will present results from a qualitative analysis of interviews conducted to examine the experience of faculty of color in communication sciences and disorders (CSD). Within the context of the existing literature, the analysis will specifically examine the role of mentoring in doctoral training, promotion and tenure, student mentoring, and other related topics. The analysis will consider how mentors have promoted or inhibited the career trajectory of faculty of color in CSD. Suggestions will be offered for supporting faculty of color through mentoring, particularly in the context of cross-cultural mentoring.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Describe specific challenges faced by faculty of color in high education.
  • Explain how mentorship impacts faculty of color in CSD.
  • List strategies for mentoring faculty of color in CSD.
  • Creating a Culture of Inclusion for 2SLGBTQIA+ Students (.15 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Concurrent Sessions D

    Location
    Broadway I/II/III
    Speakers
    • A C Goldberg, Ph.D. - Speech-Language Pathologist, Cultural Responsiveness Trainer
      AC Goldberg (he/him) PhD, CCC-SLP is a transgender Speech-Language Pathologist licensed in the US and Canada. For 17 years, he's worked with children, adolescents and adults. Currently a school clinician, AC also has a private gender affirming voice practice and is an award-winning public speaker. AC is ASHA certified, SAC affiliated, registered with CASLPO, and a member of the WPATH. He offers cultural responsiveness trainings through his CE platform, Transplaining.
    Summary
    2SLGBTQIA+ students report feeling misunderstood and sometimes encounter challenges in CSD programs. This session will provide an overview of barriers faced by 2SLGBTQIA+ within our profession and academia, current terminology, issues reported within the community as well as best practices for creating a safe, inclusive space for all students. This session will facilitate discussion regarding potential challenges students might encounter and strategies to develop more inclusive practices. From applications to fieldwork, this session will cover what you need to know about fostering a sense of belonging for all through a culturally responsive lens.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Develop an understanding of the institutional barriers faced by members of the 2SLGBTQIA+ community.
  • Identify potential barriers within their own programs and understand strategies for mitigation.
  • Learn current, inclusive terminology, as well as which outdated terminology to discontinue using along with rationale.
  • Develop an understanding of microacressions faced through the lens of those with lived experience.
  • Describe strategies and with clearly developed action plans to increase the overall comfort level of 2SLGBTQIA+ students within their programs, creating a culture of inclusion.
  • Creating a Neurodiversity Specialization in an Speech Language Pathology Master's Program (.15 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Concurrent Sessions D

    Location
    Skyline I
    Speakers
    • JoAnne Cascia, Ed.D., CCC-SLP - Faculty and Co-Coordinator of the MA in SLP & NeuroAllies Programs
      JoAnne Cascia is an Assistant Professor at Kean University. Dr. Cascia teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in Speech-Language Pathology, and is the Assessment Coordinator for the undergraduate program. Dr. Cascia's research focuses on the areas of executive function, empathy, and language in autism.
    • Mahchid Namazi, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Faculty and Executive Director of the School of Communication
      Dr. Mahchid Namazi is a tenured faculty and director of the School of Communication Disorders & Deafness at Kean University. She is an ASHA-certified multilingual speech-language pathologist with 26 years’ experience in various clinical settings and 17 years to higher education. Her scholarly activity is in multilingual and multicultural aspects of speech, language, and communication, as well as interprofessional practice and Autism.
    Summary
    Kean University has created an Autism specialization within the SLP master’s program that follows the Neurodiversity paradigm. We applied for and received a faculty scholarship grant to develop a model graduate-level training program. Our 12-credit, optional, inter-professional specialization is embedded into our graduate program without sacrificing required course content. We will share the core tenets of the Neurodiversity Framework, and the components of the development and execution of the program. We will also share our students’ reflections on their own learning.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Define the core components of Neurodiversity and its application to graduate training programs.
  • Identify a potential specialization area within an existing master’s program based on the strengths and expertise of the faculty.
  • Describe the process for developing and executing a specialization within a master's program.
  • Diving into the CSDCAS Data: Benefits to Programs, Universities, and the Profession (.15 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Concurrent Sessions D

    Location
    Skyline II
    Speakers
    • Douglas F. Parham, Ph.D. CCC-SLP - Chair/Program Director
      Douglas F. Parham, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is the Chair and Program Director of the Department of CSD at Wichita State University. He is the SLP representative for Kansas on ASHA's Committee of Ambassadors and a Site Visitor for ASHA's Council on Academic Accreditation. He is a member of CAPCSD's CSDCAS Committee. He is a Past President of the Kansas Speech-Language-Hearing Association and the Council of State Speech-Language-Hearing Association Presidents.
    • Laura Plexico, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Chair
      Laura Plexico, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is a Professor and Chair in the Communication Disorders Department at Auburn University. She teaches courses in fluency disorders, counseling, and speech science. Her research concentrates on psychosocial aspects of stuttering, communicative interaction, and the processes of personal change.
    • Radhika Aravamudhan, Ph.D., CCC-A - Dean
      Dr. Aravamudhan is a member of the planning committee representing audiology academic programs. She currently serves as the Dean of Osborne College of Audiology at Salus University in Pennsylvania. Dr. Aravamudhan previously served as an academic audiology member and the Vice-Chair for Audiology on the CAA. She currently serves on the Academic Affairs Board for ASHA.
    • Steffany M Chleboun, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Professor
      Steffany M Chleboun, PhD., CCC-SLP is a Professor and Graduate Program Director at Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville. She has taught both graduate and undergraduate courses. Her research interests include working with individuals living with acquired brain injury and aphasia. She has worked in the hospital setting as a speech-language pathologist and has experience working with adults and children with a variety of acquired communication disorders.
    Summary
    With approximately 75% of programs participating, the rich data set available from the centralized application service (CSDCAS) allows us to compile statistics on the number of applicants, designations, matriculation, and applicant profile (e.g., ethnicity, geographic). Understanding the nature of our applicant pools and final enrollment outcomes are critical to recruitment strategies and developing projections for the future of our field, in addition to the health of individual professional programs. In this session, we will present data, provide demonstrations for running data reports at the program level, and discuss how these data might be used in admissions, planning, and future development.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Run WebAdmit reports on their applicant pool.
  • Describe recent national trends in SLP and AuD applicant data.
  • Describe trends in diversity of applicants regionally.
  • Dollars and Sense: The Bottom Line in Developing and Managing Sustainable Budgets (.15 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Concurrent Sessions D

    Location
    Pavillion West
    Speakers
    • Colleen Le Prell, Ph.D. - Professor/Department Chair
      Dr. Colleen Le Prell is the Emilie and Phil Schepps Distinguished Professor of Hearing Science at the University of Texas at Dallas, Chair of the UTD Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing, and Head of the Ph.D. Program in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences. Current research programs in her laboratory include translational research programs directed at prevention of noise-induced hearing loss.
    Summary
    Creating sustainable budgets can be challenging to both clinic directors and department chairs given that most academic administrators receive little or no training on how to develop or manage a budget. This session will discuss key elements of budget development that foster sustainability and/or growth. Various budget models used at different Universities will be introduced and sources of potential revenue as well as costs will be considered. The session will also address active fiscal monitoring and decision-making when budget revisions are necessary. Fiscal planning and monitoring are key administrative responsibilities that can significantly impact operations and morale.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Identify key elements of fiscal responsibility.
  • State criteria for prioritizing line items.
  • Describe strategies for sustainable budgets.
  • The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) in Communication Sciences and Disorders (.15 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Concurrent Sessions D

    Location
    Pavillion East
    Speakers
    • Jennifer Friberg Ed.D. - Interim Director, Center for Teaching, Learning and Technology and Cross Endowed Chair in SoTL
      Jennifer C. Friberg (Ed.D., CCC-SLP, ASHA Fellow) is the Interim Director for the Center for Teaching, Learning & Technology, Cross Endowed Chair for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, and a Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Illinois State University. She is the founding Associate Editor for Teaching and Learning in Communication Sciences & Disorders and is the co-editor of Evidence-Based Education in the Classroom: Examples from Clinical Disciplines.
    Summary
    The scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) allows for a deeper understanding of learning and development of innovative strategies to facilitate academic success. These endeavors benefit students, teachers, and academic institutions. This session will describe key components of SoTL and how to bridge the gap between scholarship and classroom teaching. Attendees will leave with tools to document the SoTL for tenure and promotion.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Discuss components of the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL).
  • Apply evidence-based strategies to both academic and clinical teaching.
  • Describe tools to document SoTL for tenure and promotion.
  • x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S10)

    4/22/2022 Concurrent Sessions D

    Location
    No Room

    Comparison of Two Conditions in Clinical Supervision of Speech-Language Pathology Graduate (.05 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Posters 2

    Location
    Galleria Ballroom
    Speakers
    • Heather Anderson, Ed.D., CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor
    • Julie Smith, M.A., CCC-SLP - Clinical Assistant Professor
      Julie Smith, MA, CCC-SLP, is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Communication Disorders at Louisiana State University Health Shreveport in Shreveport, Louisiana.
    • Sandra Hayes, CLP.D., CCC-SLP - Program Director
      Sandra Hayes, SLPD
    • Stephanie Currie, M.S., CCC-SLP - Clinical Instructor
      Stephanie Currie is a speech-language pathologist who serves as adjunct faculty at Lousiana State University Health in Shreveport, Louisiana where she is also pursuing a PhD in Rehabilitation Science. In her thirty year career she has worked in a variety of settings with pediatric and adult populations. Her current research interests involve quality of life measures for people affected by aphasia.
    Summary
    Clinical supervisors in outpatient practice settings in speech-language pathology, such as university-based clinics, may employ remote supervisions methods that allow the supervisor to observe students from outside the room. A gap in the professional literature exists concerning the impact of remote supervision on student clinical behaviors. This study investigated student clinical behaviors in outpatient group pediatric treatment sessions by comparing the percentage of student interactional time in remote versus in-room supervisory scenarios. This session will present findings, as well as recommendations regarding research in supervision and use of interval recording methods for quantitative data collection.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Describe partial and full interval recording methods for quantitative data collection.
  • Identify benefits and limitations of in-room and remote supervisory conditions.
  • Identify barriers to research in clinical supervision and potential solutions.
  • Diverse Populations' Attitudes About Early Communication Services: What the Literature Shows (.05 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Posters 2

    Location
    Grand Ballroom Foyer
    Speakers
    • Krista Fitzgerald, AuD, CNIM, CCC-A, F-AAA - Director of Clinical Education/Assistant Clinical Professor
      Krista Fitzgerald, Au.D., CNIM, CCC-A, F-AAA is the Director of Clinical Education and Assistant Clinical Professor at the University of Florida. She is a graduate from the Unversity of Connecticut and has her certificate in intraoperative neuromonitoring. She enjoys sharing her knowledge in the topics of electrophysiology and medical audiology and strives to provide clinical correlates in all of her teaching experiences.
    • Kristen Lewandowski, M.A., CCC-SLP - Director of Clinical Education/Clinical Lecturer
      Kristen Lewandowski, M.A., CCC-SLP is a Clinical Lecturer and Director of Clinical Education in the Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences at the University of Florida.
    Summary
    Early intervention, including communication screenings, plays a critical role in identifying children with hearing and communication needs. Currently, data indicate many children and their families are lost to follow-up even after identification of potential communication and hearing needs. This translates to lack of assessment and intervention to ensure healthy communication development. To date, research has not yet clearly identified why children referred for services do not follow-up, and particularly, children from diverse backgrounds. We will present a literature analysis designed to explore how beliefs and attitudes about preventative care for communication and hearing contribute to engagement in diverse populations.

    Learning Objectives:
  • State current research on pediatric screening referrals and follow-up services for children in diverse populations.
  • Describe current trends highlighting reasons children and families do or do not receive follow-up services when given a hearing and/or communication referral.
  • Discuss how inclusive practices in clinical education impacts cultural competence of future clinicians.
  • Effect of Online Supplemental Instruction in Undergraduate Communication Disorders Courses (.05 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Posters 2

    Location
    Galleria Ballroom
    Speakers
    • Emily Bates - Program Coordinator
      My name is Emily Bates and I am the Supplemental Instruction Coordinator at San Diego State University. I grew up in Northern Virginia and went to James Madison University for my undergraduate degree. I attended CSU Long Beach, for my master's in Experimental Psychology. In fall 2017, I started working at SDSU and have grown SI from ~50 SI Leaders serving 9 courses to 80 SI Leaders serving 18 courses
    • Ignatius Nip, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Ignatius Nip, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is an Associate Professor and the interim Director of the School of Speech-Language and Hearing Sciences at San Diego State University.
    Summary
    Supplemental Instruction (SI) is a peer-led program that focuses on developing students’ active learning strategies (Arendale, 2002). This program has been successfully used in large “high-risk” undergraduate courses (e.g., first-year STEM courses) and is associated with higher average grades and graduate rates (Dawson et al., 2014). SDSU launched a pilot on-line SI program for junior students SDSU in Fall 2020. Data from 6 junior courses demonstrate that on average students attending SI had average test grades ranging from 8-14% higher than those who did not attend SI. Discussion will focus on how SI benefited these students and its implications.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Describe the evidence for using Supplemental Instruction to improve undergraduate student outcomes.
  • Identify how Supplemental Instruction uses peer mentoring to teach active learning strategies.
  • Compare the outcomes for students who did and did not make use of Supplemental Instruction.
  • Effective IPECP Messaging and Resource Development for Health Professions Education and Practice (.05 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Posters 2

    Location
    Galleria Ballroom
    Speakers
    • Loretta Nunez, MA, AuD, CCC-A/SLP - Director Academic Affairs and Research Education
      Loretta Nunez, M.A., Au.D., CCC-A/SLP, ASHA Fellow, FNAP, is ASHA’s Director of Academic Affairs & Research Education. She directs activities supporting academic, clinical and research education encompassing educational initiatives, personnel preparation, and higher education trends and forecasting. She leads ASHA's strategic objective to advance interprofessional education and collaborative practice. Loretta has worked in both academic and clinical settings prior to joining ASHA.
    • Lynn Williams, Ph.D. - Associate Dean and Professor
      A. Lynn Williams, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor at East Tennessee State University. Dr. Williams recently served as the ASHA Vice-President for Academic Affairs in Speech-Language Pathology (2016-2018) and chaired the Ad Hoc Committee on Graduate Education in SLP (2018-2020). She is the 2022 ASHA Immediate Past President.
    Summary
    Effective resources are key to advancing IPECP engagement across education and practice settings and stakeholder groups. This poster will describe efforts undertaken by ASHA over the course of three years to 1) assess IPECP messages and perspectives among audiologists, speech-language pathologists, and select related health professions; 2) revise and apply effective IPECP messaging based on stakeholder feedback, evidence and best practices, and 3) develop and disseminate new resources (rubrics, videos, case studies, evidence maps, etc.) designed to promote understanding of what constitutes IPECP, it’s benefits, and its implementation in academic and clinical education and practice settings.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Describe the hallmarks of effective IPECP messaging to garner buy-in and engagement of clinicians, faculty, administrators, and students.
  • Identify how effective messaging was incorporated into IPECP resources for use with students and health professionals.
  • Describe at least three new IPECP resources available for health professions education and their utilization in education, practice, research, and advocacy.
  • Grammar Cat: Student Perceptions of a Gaming Application for Metalinguistic Practice (.05 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Posters 2

    Location
    Grand Ballroom Foyer
    Speakers
    • Anne Perrotti, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Anne Marie Perrotti, PhD, CCC-SLP, Associate Professor, Undergraduate Program Director, Old Dominion University Dr. Anne Marie Perrotti is passionate about transformative and equitable teaching and learning. As an Associate Professor at Old Dominion University, she dedicates her research to bridging perspectives using an interprofessional approach combining entrepreneurship and design thinking for the development of innovative solutions which improve outcomes for young adults in the school-to-confinement pipeline and speech-language pathology students.
    • Corrin Gillis, CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Anne Marie Perrotti, PhD, CCC-SLP, Associate Professor, Undergraduate Program Director, Old Dominion University Dr. Anne Marie Perrotti is passionate about transformative and equitable teaching and learning. As an Associate Professor at Old Dominion University, she dedicates her research to bridging perspectives using an interprofessional approach combining entrepreneurship and design thinking for the development of innovative solutions which improve outcomes for young adults in the school-to-confinement pipeline and speech-language pathology students.
    Summary
    Using language sampling as a diagnostic tool requires specific metalinguistic skills, including sentence deconstruction, grammatical identification, and metric calculations (Owens, Pavelko, & Bambinelli, 2018). Grammatical identification is often a difficult and elusive skill for speech-language pathology students (Rowely, 2010). Students struggle with verbs, pronouns, and conjunctions. While there is evidence supporting spaced retrieval practice for learning grammar for English language learners (Miles, 2010, 2014), there are no methods combining spaced retrieval and gaming for improving this metalinguistic skill. Grammar Cat is a metalinguistic gaming application designed by the first author and student perceptions of its functionality will be presented.

    Learning Objectives:
  • List their own course objectives that would be appropriate for facilitation through gaming.
  • Discuss principles of retrieval practice for learning.
  • Describe the parameters of a gaming application that best meet the learning needs of students.
  • Intercampus Health Care Simulation Model : Development of Interprofessional Socialization and Competency (.05 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Posters 2

    Location
    Galleria Ballroom
    Speakers
    • Cody Marie Busch, Ed.D., CCC-SLP - Clinic Director/Clinical Assistant Professor
      Cody Marie Busch, Ed.D., CCC-SLP is the Clinic Director at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Center for Communicative Disorders. Dr. Busch worked as a medical speech-language pathologist before moving into higher education. She has an interest in simulated learning experiences and developed several hands-on simulations for speech-language pathology graduate students. In 2021, Dr. Busch earned the Graduate School Teaching Award for her work with simulated learning experiences.
    • Lynn Gilbertson, Ph.D. - Graduate Program Director/Department Chair
      Lynn Gilbertson, Ph.D is an associate professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Wisconsin–Whitewater. Her research has transitioned from psychoacoustics and occupational noise exposure to development of high impact practices due to her recent administrative roles as department chair and associate director of undergraduate research. She is passionate about encouraging students to integrate science and technology to support hearing health and communication access.
    Summary
    Clinical education standards for SLP and nursing programs indicate the need for experience with interprofessional collaborative practice (ICP). We present a case study model for interprofessional healthcare simulation to apply to schools with limited access to a variety of professional programs and complimentary medical specialties at their home institution. The partnership of a MS SLP program at a public state sponsored institution and a BSN program at a private college provides insights on model effectiveness. Students reported high ratings of confidence, understanding of professional roles, and a shared respect for the unique responsibilities of each team member.

    Learning Objectives:
  • List benefits of ICP simulated learning experiences.
  • Summarize the steps for planning/implementation of intercampus ICP learning experiences.
  • Identify opportunities to integrate parts of the presented framework into their clinical training program.
  • Interprofessional Collaboration & Training of Nursing Students on Autism Spectrum Disorders (.05 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Posters 2

    Location
    Galleria Ballroom
    Speakers
    • Ashley O'Rourke, Ed.D, M.S., CCC-SLP, TSSLD - Assistant Professor/Program Director
      Dr. O'Rourke serves as an Assistant Professor and the Program Director of the Communication Disorders program at Mercy College. she is a licensed SLP with a clinical focus on developmental disorders in pediatrics. She teaches graduate-level courses on autism spectrum disorders, augmentative alternative communication, pediatric feeding disorders, and professional issues. She has traveled internationally to provide speech, language, and feeding services to those with developmental disabilities and craniofacial anomalies.
    Summary
    The study was designed to assess the effectiveness of a training curriculum administered by a speech-language pathologist on Autism Spectrum Disorders for students enrolled in a family nurse practitioner program. Inclusion criteria was enrollment in an FNP program. Pre and post-test responses on the Knowledge About Childhood Autism Among Health Workers questionnaire were collected. The participants' sum pre-test scores were compared to the sum post-test scores; results indicated a significant effect (p= 0. 00). Improved post-test scores suggest that the training had a significant effect on the learner. Additionally, 86% of participants identified the training as 'significantly' benefitting patient care.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Identify the gaps in health care provider student knowledge related to Autism Spectrum Disorders and patient care.
  • Describe how to utilize the Center for Disease Control’s Autism Case Training (ACT): A Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics Curriculum as an interprofessional learning tool.
  • List 3 topic areas related to Autism Spectrum Disorders to educate nursing students, which will benefit patient care.
  • Moving Toward Holistic Admissions in SLP: Process and Results at UW-Milwaukee (.05 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Posters 2

    Location
    Grand Ballroom Foyer
    Speakers
    • Shelley Lund, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Shelley Lund is an Associate Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM). She has been Program Director for the MS program in Speech-Language Pathology since 2019. Dr. Lund teaches and conducts research in Augmentative and Alternative Communication and Intellectual and Developmental Disorders. She serves as a member of the College of Health Sciences Equity Alliance which is committed to improving diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging at UWM.
    Summary
    Our profession faces a crisis regarding the lack of diversity in its workforce. This will not change unless more students of color earn graduate degrees in SLP. Holistic admissions is a process that has had a positive effect on diversifying the students admitted to other graduate health professions. In 2019, the UWM graduate program began a transition to holistic admissions. This poster will present the steps to implement holistic admissions gradually over a three-year period. Admissions decisions will be analyzed statistically to determine if these changes resulted in more students of color being admitted to the program.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Describe the tenets of holistic admissions.
  • Describe how one SLP graduate program implemented holistic admissions.
  • Describe how changes in admissions procedures affected outcomes for one SLP graduate program.
  • Teaching Students Across Disciplines to Provide Collaborative and Culturally Responsive Aural Re/habilitation (.05 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Posters 2

    Location
    Grand Ballroom Foyer
    Speakers
    • John Gallagher, M.A., CCC-SLP - Visiting Assistant Professor
      John Gallagher, M.A., CCC-SLP, is a visiting assistant professor of special education, language, and literacy at The College of New Jersey in Ewing, NJ. John is a speech-language pathologist by training and holds a master of arts and certificate in bilingual speech-language pathology from San Diego State University. John's teaching, research, and clinical interests include language development, disparities, and disorders in young children, collaborative practice, social justice, and public policy.
    Summary
    Speech-language pathologists (SLPs), audiologists (AuDs), and teachers of the Deaf/Hard of Hearing (TODs) hold knowledge and beliefs of hearing health care and culture that are both shared and distinct. One model of teaching an Aural Re/habilitation course, cross-listed across programs and under/graduate levels, is shared. In the course, a combined interprofessional and culturally responsive framework was used to engage pre-clinical students, value patient-centered care, and appreciate the benefits of collaborative practice. Students were paired across programs to participate in a variety of intentionally designed cultural competency and case study assignments. Recommendations for program development, course design, and curriculum are shared.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Evaluate the benefits and challenges of combining courses across programs (e.g., teachers of the d/Deaf and HOH, SLP/Audiology).
  • List potential assignments and structures to engage students across professional boundaries and encourage culturally responsive communication care.
  • Reflect on their own practice in the classroom, clinical practice, and program development as it pertains to cultural responsiveness and interprofessional education/practice.
  • Using Multiple Sources of Data to Predict Success in an Undergraduate Course (.05 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Posters 2

    Location
    Galleria Ballroom
    Speakers
    • Ignatius Nip, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Ignatius Nip, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is an Associate Professor and the iterim Director of the School of Speech Language and Hearing Sciences at San Diego State University.
    • Maureen Guarcello, Ph.D. - Research, Analytics and Strategic Communication Specialist
      Maureen A. Guarcello, PhD is the Research, Analytics, and Strategic Communications Specialist at San Diego State University. She has 20 years of higher education experience, with research and practice focused on how predictive and learning analytics inform student success interventions and policy. Maureen also holds a special appointment in Analytic Studies and Institutional Research where she is working on a data lake project and several data informed strategic planning initiatives.
    Summary
    Many factors, including racial/ethnic identity (Deal-Williams, 2020; Dwivedi, 2018), student behaviors (Smith et al., 2012), and high-impact practices (Johnson & State, 2018) can impact student success. Sociodemographic, behavioral, and student engagement data was collected through the learning management system and a survey in an upper-level undergraduate course (n=162 students) at a Hispanic-serving institution during Fall 2019. A combination of behavioral, sociodemographic, and student engagement impacted students’ final grades. Students most at risk of having poorer grades included those without a friend in class, students of color, lower attendance, less time in the learning management system, and time spent studying.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Identify sociodemographic variables (e.g., racial/ethnic identity, first-generation) impact success in an undergraduate course.
  • Identify behavioral variables (e.g., class attendance, learning analytics) impact success in an undergraduate course.
  • Identify student engagement variables (e.g., previous experience in the field, member of a student organization) impact success in an undergraduate course.
  • x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S11)

    4/22/2022 Posters 2

    Location
    No Room

    Leading Effective Guided Observation Discussions and Debrief Sessions with Simucase (.1 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Lunch 2

    Speakers
    • Clint Johnson, MA, CCC-SLP, CHSE - Vice President of Simucase Education
      Clint Johnson, MA, CCC-SLP, CHSE is a Certified Healthcare Simulation Educator. He is the Vice President of Simucase Education and trains faculty and students to use computer-based simulations successfully. Mr. Johnson has been an SLP for 25 years and has 13 years of experience in educational publishing and software development.
    • Erica Ligon, M.Ed., CCC-SLP - Lead Learning and Simulation Development
      Erica Ligon currently serves as the Speech-Language Pathology Lead Learning and Simulation Developer at Simucase. Erica has practiced as a speech-language pathologist for over ten years and has experience diagnosing and treating a broad range of communication disorders across the lifespan. Throughout her career, Erica has worked in schools, medical facilities, and private practice. Erica completed her undergraduate and master’s degrees at The University of Georgia.
    • Katie Ondo, MA, CCC-SLP, CHSE - Editor in Chief
      Katie Ondo, MA, CCC-SLP, CHSE is a Certified Healthcare Simulation Educator and Editor in Chief for Simucase. She has developed computer-based simulations for 10+ years and has been providing tele-supervision services for 3 years. Katie also is employed by Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and specializes in acute care.
    Summary
    Presenters will demonstrate how to utilize new Simucase platform enhancements to supervise clinical simulations and video observations efficiently and effectively. Outcome data and student feedback from the Simucase Guided Observation program and Simulation Supervision program will be presented. Additionally, presenters will provide tools for evaluating participation, performance, and overall satisfaction.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Describe the procedures and methodology for leading reflective guided observation and debrief discussions.
  • Summarize outcome data from Guided Observation program and Simulation Supervision program.
  • Demonstrate how to use resources shared during the presentation to conduct reflective guided observation and debrief discussions.
  • Part II: Exploring the Intercultural Development Continuum (IDC) and Possibilities for Change (.1 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Lunch 2

    Speakers
    • Jayne Brandel, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Chair, Associate Professor
      Jayne Brandel is an Associate Professor and Chair of the CSD Department at West Virginia University. As an ASHA-certified speech-language pathologist, her research interests are focused on increasing the use of research-based activities in the evaluation and treatment of language-based disorders in schools. Additionally, she has begun to explore effective clinical instructional practices at the university level as well as regarding professional development activities.
    • Maya Reynolds Clark, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor and Program Director
      Maya Reynolds Clark, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is an associate professor and program director for Communication Sciences and Disorders at Georgia Southern University. As director of the LEADS lab, she focuses on cultural factors in communication and cognition, implicit bias, social cognitive theory and clinical education. As an Office of Inclusive Excellence Senior Faculty Fellow, Dr. Clark is dedicated to using her expertise to assist families from diverse cultures and marginalized backgrounds.
    Summary
    Understanding the way in which program stakeholders interpret lived experience is key to developing programmatic DEI/JB goals and the basis of an intercultural development plan. The Intercultural Development Continuum (IDC) provides a framework for understanding how individuals and teams experience similarities and differences as well as support for moving from a monocultural mindset to a multicultural mindset. The purpose of this session is to offer insight into how one’s stage of development may both positively and negatively impact their program experiences. Opportunities for change will also be explored.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Describe the Intercultural Development Continuum.
  • Explain the mindset relative to experiences at each developmental stage of the Intercultural Development Continuum (IDC).
  • Identify opportunities in one’s own program for change.
  • Advancing Equity and Inclusion Through Facilitated Conversations with Students and Departmental Actions (.1 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Concurrent Sessions E

    Location
    Broadway I/II/III
    Speakers
    • Carolyn Quam, Ph.D. - Assistant Professor of Speech and Hearing Sciences
      Carolyn Quam, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor in the Speech and Hearing Sciences department at Portland State University and director of the Child Language Learning Center. Her research employs a variety of methods (including eye-tracking, infant habituation, and category-learning/cue-weighting) to test central questions of how children learn the sound structure of language—or multiple languages—and how this might differ across age and in typical language development and developmental language disorder.
    • Curtis Hartling, AuD, CCC-A - Clinical Assistant Professor
      Curtis Hartling is an Assistant Clinical Professor in the Department of Speech & Hearing Sciences at Portland State University (PSU). He is also a Clinical Audiologist at Pacific University in Hillsboro, Oregon. Curtis has a background in research and clinical audiology. Clinically, Curtis specializes in diagnostic audiometry, fitting hearing aids, and hearing conservation for musicians. He enjoys incorporating these experiences into his teachings at PSU.
    • Jeff Conn, Ph.D., Linguistics, M.S., SPHR, CCC-SLP - Associate Clinical Professor
    • Megann McGill, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor
      Megann McGill, PhD, CCC-SLP is an assistant professor in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences at Portland State University in Portland, Oregon. She is a Spanish-English bilingual speech-language pathologist and clinical researcher interested in partnering with clients who stutter and their families to meet their communication goals. Dr. McGill’s clinical research interests center around stuttering, bilingualism, and telepractice.
    • Teresa Roberts, Ed.D., CCC-SLP - Clinical Assistant Professor
      Teresa Roberts, EdD, SLP (she, her) works as Clinical Assistant Professor in Speech and Hearing Sciences at Portland State University in Portland, Oregon. Her areas of interest include language development and disorders, multiculturalism, and postsecondary pedagogy. She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses and provides clinical training in assessments.
    Summary
    This presentation will describe a series of facilitated conversations which were conducted to explore the strengths and weaknesses of Portland State University’s undergraduate and graduate speech-language pathology programs in supporting students who are historically underrepresented and marginalized in higher education. This presentation will address: 1) the importance of seeking student perspectives when examining educational access and departmental cultures, 2) the facilitated conversations methodology utilized in our department, 3) the results of our data analyses, and 4) recommendations for attendees who are seeking to replicate this study within their own programs.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Describe methodological considerations for holding facilitated conversations with students centered around diversity, equity, and inclusion topics.
  • Describe the results of the facilitated conversations held at Portland State University and the associated departmental actions planned to increase equity and inclusion for underrepresented students in higher education.
  • Identify steps in designing facilitated conversations for underrepresented students within their own program or department.
  • Discovering New Approaches to Graduate Student Dysphagia Education Through Simulation (.1 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Concurrent Sessions E

    Location
    Council Suite
    Speakers
    • Jessica Bahls, M.S., CCC-SLP - SLP, Clinical Supervisor and Instructor
      Jessica Bahls is a licensed speech-language pathologist with over eight years of experience working primarily in medical and university settings. Jessica specializes in evaluation and treatment of adults with voice, swallowing, and communication disorders. She currently works as a master clinician and clinical instructor at the University of Delaware Speech-Language- Hearing Clinic and as a per diem speech-language pathologist at Christiana Care in Newark, DE.
    • Julie McCauley, M.S., CCC-SLP - SLP
      Julie McCauley, MS, CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist and full-time Lead Master Clinician with the University of Delaware Speech-Language Hearing Clinic. She has been working in the field of Speech-Language Pathology for 18 years evaluating and treating adults with communication and/or swallowing disorders. She has been working for University of Delaware since the onset of the clinic in 2015, supervising students and developing innovative opportunities to maximize learning.
    • Kimberly McGinley, M.A., CCC-SLP - SLP
      Kimberly McGinley, MA, CCC/SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist with 30 years experience in the field. She is a Supervising Clinician and Course instructor for the University of Delaware's Communication Sciences and Disorders program. Additionally, she is a Sole Proprietor of a pediatric private practice that focuses on consultation and treatment of infants, children, and young adults with a variety of speech, language, and feeding disorders.
    • Kristen Palmer, M.A., CCC-SLP, BCS-S - SLP
      Kristen Palmer, M.A., CCC-SLP, BCS-S, is speech pathologist working as clinical instructor and supervisor at the University of Delaware. She is a graduate of Loyola College in Maryland and Northwestern University, receiving board certification in swallowing and swallowing disorders in 2014. She has over 20 years experience in medical speech pathology at ChristianaCare, specializing in the speech and swallow needs of medically complex patients.
    Summary
    Supervising speech-language pathologists (SLPs) within the University of Delaware master’s speech pathology program observed a gap between classroom learning in dysphagia and the skills required to be successful student clinicians. Given the high fidelity and engaging interaction Healthcare Theatre (HT) provides (Cowperthwait, et al, 2014 and 2015), SLPs collaborated with the University’s HT department and created four dysphagia simulations using trained standardized patients (actors) and a patient simulator manikin. Students rotated through four dysphagia simulations. Students responded to pre-and post-rating scales related to confidence and clinical knowledge. Findings reveal knowledge of dysphagia and confidence increased after simulation experiences.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Describe the role healthcare theatre can play in dysphagia education.
  • Discuss specific adaptations that were made to allow students/faculty/staff to gather using appropriate personal protective equipment during the simulation experience while following COVID-19 guidelines.
  • State the 3 components of the '3-D model of debriefing' (Zigmont, et al.. (2011), to enhance student learning in simulation.
  • Project ECHO: A Powerful Platform for Community Engagement (.1 CEUS)

    4/22/2022 Concurrent Sessions E

    Location
    Forum Suite
    Speakers
    • Catherine Bacon, M.A., CCC-SLP - Clinical Professor
      Catherine Bacon, M.A., CCC-SLP is a Clinical Professor in Speech and Hearing Sciences at Arizona State University. She teaches graduate and undergraduate classes and coordinates ASU’s SLPA certificate program. Cathy has provided clinical supervision for over 30 years.
    • Jean Brown, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Clinical Professor
    • Shelly Gray, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Professor
      Shelley Gray is a Professor of Speech and Hearing Science in the College of Health Solutions at Arizona State University. She leads the Child Language and Literacy Lab (CHILLL) that focuses on the development of early literacy, reading, and working memory in children and adolescents. She also leads the Early Childhood Early Literacy and Language Project ECHO collaboration in the College of Health Solutions.
    Summary
    Clinical training programs are challenged to collaborate with and support professionals in the community. Project ECHO© (Extension of Community Health Outcomes) is an exciting platform that promotes training and collaboration. ECHO participants collaborate with the expert hub team and each other to learn and help manage complex cases. ECHO’s “all teach, all learn” philosophy reduces inequality in service delivery by reaching rural communities. The College of Health Solutions at Arizona State University is a hub for Project ECHO©. Our speech and hearing faculty lead three ongoing ECHOs. They will share data and explain how to start your own ECHO.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Describe how Project ECHO model cultivates collaboration among community practitioners to enhance professional efficacy.
  • Identify four guiding principles of Project ECHO.
  • Explain how Project ECHO reduces inequality in service delivery and promotes inclusion.
  • Infusing Simulation into Assessment of Student Clinician Performance (.15 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Concurrent Sessions E

    Location
    Skyline II
    Speakers
    • Erin Cardman, M.A., CCC-SLP - Clinical Supervisor
      Erin Anne Cardman, MA CCC-SLP is a Clinical Educator at the GWU Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, and serves as the department coordinator for simulated patient education. In almost 20 years as a clinician, she has worked in an inpatient rehabilitation setting, acute care and the public schools. Areas of expertise include aphasia, cognitive-linguistic disorders, and dysphagia. She has advanced training in dysphagia management and is LSVT certified.
    Summary
    Simulations provide a standardized method of evaluating clinical skills across students. This session will define and discuss models and examples of simulation that could apply in CSD clinical education, specifically in the assessment of students’ clinical progress.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Define simulations related to CSD clinical education.
  • Identify best practice for use of simulated experiences in CSD clinical education.
  • Discuss implementation models for using simulations within student clinical performance evaluation.
  • Setting the Bar High: Professional Expectations (.15 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Concurrent Sessions E

    Location
    Pavillion West
    Speakers
    • Julie Wolter, Ph.D. - Associate Vice Provost for Innovation and Online Learning
      Julie A. Wolter, PhD, CCC-SLP, ASHA Fellow, is Associate Vice Provost for Innovation and Online Learning and Affiliate Professor of the School of Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences at the University of Montana. Her teaching and research focus on school-age language-literacy development in children with DLD/dyslexia. Dr. Wolter is widely published and her training and research are currently supported through the U.S. Department of Education and National Institutes of Health.
    Summary
    The transition to graduate school often requires a shift in perspective, presentation, and behavior from student to clinician. This requires faculty to teach and model expectations for appropriate representation of the program and the professions. This session will facilitate discussion of establishing a culture that teaches, expects, and models professionalism.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Define professional expectations for student clinicians (e.g., social media, punctuality, dress code, communication).
  • Identify the culture of all faculty intentionally modeling and communicating expectations of professionalism in the academic and clinical environments.
  • Provide a program example of successful implementation of professionalism training.
  • The Future of Learning, Work, and Teaching: Directions for Change (.15 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Concurrent Sessions E

    Location
    Pavillion East
    Speakers
    • Donna Smiley, Ph.D., CCC-A, ASHA Fellow - Chief Staff Officer for Audiology
      Donna Smiley, Ph.D., CCC-A, ASHA Fellow, is the Chief Staff Officer for Audiology at ASHA. She liaises with the staff who oversee ASHA’s Audiology Professional Practices Unit, Certification, Accreditation, and Ethics. She is the objective owner of the Future of Learning Strategic Objective in ASHA’s Strategic Pathway to Excellence.
    • Lemmietta G. McNeilly, Ph.D., CCC-SLP FASAECAE - Chief Staff Officer, Speech Language Pathology
      Lemmietta McNeilly, PhD, CCC-SLP, FASAE, CAE, ASHA Fellow, serves as ASHA’s Chief Staff Officer for Speech-Language Pathology. responsible for SLP Practices, Government Affairs and Public Policy, Special Interest Groups, International Programs and the Enhanced Service Delivery Strategic Objective, including practicing at the Top of the License. She has international publiications and presentations regarding the topics of innovative models of education, competency based education, working with SLPAs and functional outcomes.
    • Loretta Nunez, MA, AuD, CCC-A/SLP - Director, Academic Affairs and Research Education
      Loretta Nunez, M.A., AuD, CCC-A/SLP, ASHA Fellow, FNAP is Director of Academic Affairs & Research Education at ASHA. She directs activities that support academic, clinical and research education; personnel preparation; faculty development; higher education trends and forecasting in CSD; and is the objective owner of the Interprofessional Education/Interprofessional Practice Strategic Objective.
    • Margaret Rogers, PhD, CCC-SLP - Chief Staff Officer for Science & Research
      Margaret Rogers, PhD, CCC-SLP, ASHA Fellow, is the Chief Staff Officer for Science and Research at ASHA. She liaises with the staff who oversee ASHA’s Journals Program, Leader, Practice Portal, Evidence Maps, Academic Affairs and Research Education, Survey and Analysis, National Center for Evidence-Based Practice, and Strategic Objective on EBP.
    Summary
    The evolving imortance of the future of learning, work, and teaching (F3) will be discussed regarding the potential to identify solutions and directions for change for CSD. We will describe work underway by ASHA’s new Strategic Objective on the Future of Learning, by the Future of Learning Working Group of the Ad Hoc Committee on Next Steps for Redesigning SLP Education, and by ASHA staff and volunteers who support the association’s strategic initiatives and programs. Consideration of the F3 revolution helps to map directions for change and to ready ourselves to see and seize opportunities that could advance CSD education.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Describe three factors that are shaping the future of learning, work, and teaching.
  • Identify three areas that could be improved due to the F3 revolution relative to CSD education.
  • Discuss the relationship between the future of work and the future of learning, and also between the future of learning and the future of teaching.
  • x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S12)

    4/22/2022 Concurrent Sessions E

    Location
    No Room

    Sex, Death, and Religion: Teaching New Clinicians to Confront Difficult Conversations (.1 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Concurrent Sessions F

    Location
    Atrium Ballroom
    Speakers
    • Laura Sambrookes-McQuade, SLP.D., M.A., CCC-SLP - Clinical Assistant Professor
      Laura Sambrookes-McQuade SLPD, CCC-SLP, Clinical Assistant Professor Faculty at Midwestern University's Downers Grove campus, has 21 years of experience as a speech-language pathologist. Dr. Sambrookes-McQuade's doctoral research included exploring which teaching interventions were most efficacious in delivering challenging information. She provides compassionate diagnostic and intervention services for her clients and excellence in clinical education and supervision for students founded in evidence-based best practices.
    • Laura Wolford, Ph.D., M.S., CCC-SLP, CTP - Assistant Professor
      Laura Wolford, PhD, MS CCC-SLP, CTP is a speech-language pathologist, education researcher, and sex educator. Her work with medically complex patients taught her that addressing sexual health is an urgent need for our clients, leading her to seek sex education training. Communication disorders affect intimacy and consent, but we rarely discuss these sensitive topics. Her goal is to bring SLPs into the conversation about consent, sexual health, and safety.
    Summary
    The transition to clinical practice is rife with anxiety for most new clinicians, especially when difficult conversations occur. These are not uncommon in speech therapy. Clients bring up unexpected topics and challenging questions. SLPs address sensitive issues, like end-of-life care, relationship changes, and cultural differences relating to communication. These conversations are part of client-centered therapy, and they’re integral to creating an inclusive clinical environment. Yet they can be very challenging for new clinicians. This session discusses consensus definitions of uncomfortable conversations, multidisciplinary models for addressing them, and results of an initial study on teaching empathy.

    Learning Objectives:
  • List 3 ways clinicians often make awkward moments more difficult.
  • Identify at least 1 model of how to bring up uncomfortable topics.
  • Describe 1 way to teach students to harness empathy to reduce awkwardness.
  • Addressing the Ph.D. Shortage in CSD: A Panel Discussion (.15 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Concurrent Sessions F

    Location
    Broadway I/II/III
    Speakers
    • Carla Wood, Ph.D. - Professor/Director
      Carla Wood, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is Director and a Professor in the School of Communication Science & Disorders at Florida State University. Her teaching and research engagement focuses on child language development and disorders with specific emphasis on language and literacy interventions for underserved students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. She has been a certified speech-language pathologist for over 25 years which included working in elementary schools and early intervention.
    • Colleen Le Prell, Ph.D. - Professor/Department Chair
      Dr. Colleen Le Prell is the Emilie and Phil Schepps Distinguished Professor of Hearing Science at the University of Texas at Dallas, Chair of the UTD Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing, and Head of the Ph.D. Program in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences. Current research programs in her laboratory include translational research programs directed at prevention of noise-induced hearing loss.
    • Mellisa Duff, Ph.D. - Associate Professor
      Melissa C. Duff, PhD, CCC-SLP, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and director of its doctoral program. Her research focuses on the role of memory in language and social interaction the factors that influence long-term outcome following acquired brain injury. Dr. Duff has an established record of research funding from the NIH and was named ASHA Fellow in 2018.
    Summary
    The known shortage of Ph.D. faculty members in CSD poses a challenge not only for programs and faculty but also for research, the development of evidence-based practice, and the fields at large. Recruiting and admissions practices should reflect program priorities. Due to the shortage, creative measures might be necessary to foster future growth in Ph.D. faculty.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Recruit students from different academic and professional stages and with diverse backgrounds.
  • Evaluate program priorities and aligning priorities with recruitment and admissions practices.
  • Mentor current and potential students in pursuit of Ph.D.
  • Improving Programmatic Climate: Development and Implementation of a CSD Bias Reporting Tool (.15 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Concurrent Sessions F

    Location
    Skyline II
    Speakers
    • Jennifer Meyer, M.S., CCC-SLP - Director of Clinical Education
      Jennifer Meyer is the Director of Clinical Education at the University of Oregon working with diverse students, clients and colleagues. She actively engages in social justice/advocacy work in her workplace and community. Jennifer's other interest areas include gender affirming communication services and clinical training and mentoring clinical educators.
    • Lauren Cycyk, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor
      Lauren M. Cycyk, PhD, CCC-SLP is an Assistant Professor in Communication Disorders and Sciences at the University of Oregon. Her research focuses on early language development, disorders, and intervention in multilingual populations, particularly Spaninsh-English speakers. She also studies equity issues in early intervention and early childhood special education. Lauren speaks Spanish and has served as a speech-language pathologist in medical and education settings in the United States and Mexico.
    • Samantha Shune, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Director of Clinical Education
      Samantha Shune, PhD, CCC-SLP is an Associate Professor at the University of Oregon. As the current Director of the Communication Disorders and Sciences Program, she has helped guide programmatic efforts targeting diversity, equity, and inclusion, including centering the program’s current two-year strategic plan on anti-racism. Her research interests also include the effects of aging on the physiologic and social aspects of the swallowing and mealtime processes.
    Summary
    CSD students who experience microaggressions or other forms of bias have limited options for sharing information in a timely and confidential manner in ways that inform program development. Centralized university reporting processes and tools are often legally constrained and require formal complaints. Students may not feel comfortable approaching individuals regarding bias experienced in classroom and clinical settings. Without a localized mechanism for learning of students’ concerns, CSD programs are challenged to respond. A confidential online reporting tool specific to CSD was developed and piloted to examine feedback and inform initiatives that improve the climate for BIPOC and other underrepresented students.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Identify the benefits of local bias reporting mechanisms to creating welcoming and inclusive climates in CSD programs.
  • Learn the steps to develop and pilot a bias reporting tool for CSD students.
  • Describe how the data collected from such a tool can be used to inform targeted programmatic efforts toward improving equity in CSD programs.
  • Problem Solving and Information Exchange for Audiology Clinic Directors: Audiology Externships (.15 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Concurrent Sessions F

    Location
    Forum Suite
    Speakers
    • Jennifer Simpson, AuD, CCC-A - Clinical Professor and Associate Head
      Jennifer M. Simpson is a Clinical Professor and Associate Head in the Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences Department at Purdue University. She currently serves as the Vice President of Organizational Advancement on the CAPCSD Board of Directors. Her clinical interests include clinical education, pediatric diagnostic audiology and intervention, and administration.
    Summary
    This facilitated session provides an opportunity for AuD clinical directors to discuss ways to expand clinical opportunities for students, improve the externship application process, and problem-solve externship placement challenges. Questions will be addressed with an opportunity for group problem solving and information sharing to facilitate solution-centered support.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Discuss ways to improve the externship application process.
  • Discuss ways to overcome externship challenges.
  • List strategies to balance the needs of the academic and clinical missions.
  • Problem Solving and Information Exchange for Chairs: An Opportunity for Connection (.15 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Concurrent Sessions F

    Location
    Pavillion West
    Speakers
    • Lynette Austin, Ph.D., M.A., CCC-SLP - Professor/Chair
      Dr. Lynette Austin, CCC/SLP, is a professor and department chair for Abilene Christian University’s Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders. She has served in that role since 2016. A s an academic leader, Dr. Austin is interested in helping professionals with clinical expertise develop leadership skills in academia. Primary areas of teaching/research in the field of speech-language pathology have to do with service provision for multilingual speakers/English Learners.
    • Sharon Williams, Ph.D. - Associate Professor
      Sharon Wallace Williams, PhD, CCC-A Associate Professor Director, Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences Department of Allied Health Sciences University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chapel Hill NC
    Summary
    This facilitated session invites program chairs and directors to engage in structured sharing on the topic of why and how department leaders may choose to connect with each other as we often lead through change (and even chaos!) Questions will be addressed with an opportunity for group problem solving and information sharing to facilitate solution-centered support.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Identify opportunities that department chairs and directors have for connecting with one another.
  • List advantages (and possible disadvantages) of connection: balancing connection and autonomy.
  • Describe 'keepers' that department chairs and directors may take forward with them from the pandemic.
  • Problem Solving and Information Exchange SLP Clinic Directors: Another Opportunity for Connection (.15 CEUs)

    4/22/2022 Concurrent Sessions F

    Location
    Pavillion East
    Speakers
    • Cara Boester, M.A., CCC-SLP - Director of Clinical Education - SLP
      Cara Boester MA, CCC-SLP, is the Director of Clinical Experiences for Speech-Language Pathology in the CSD Department at Illinois State University. In addition to her administrative duties scheduling on-campus and externship placements, she provides speech, language, and aural rehab services to deaf/hard-of-hearing clients across the age span.
    Summary
    This facilitated session provides an opportunity for clinical directors to discuss ways to expand clinical opportunities for students, review external placement challenges, and explore ways to evaluate clinical faculty. Questions will be addressed with an opportunity for group problem solving and information sharing to facilitate solution-centered support.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Discuss ways to overcome externship challenges.
  • List strategies to balance the needs of the academic and clinical missions.
  • Discuss tools for evaluating clinical educators/faculty.
  • x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S13)

    4/22/2022 Concurrent Sessions F

    Location
    No Room

    CAPCSD Business Meeting

    4/23/2022 CAPCSD Business Meeting

    Location
    Pavilion Ballroom
    Speakers
    • Michael Bamdad, M.A - CAPCSD President

    x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S14)

    4/23/2022 CAPCSD Business Meeting

    Location
    No Room

    Inclusive Design: Rubrics, Policies & Procedures for Holistic Review in Graduate Admissions (.1 CEUs)

    4/23/2022 Concurrent Sessions G

    Location
    Pavilion Ballroom
    Speakers
    • Carmel Nicol, MSW - Assistant Director, Graduate and Professional Admissions
      Carmel Nicol, MSW, is an Assistant Director of Graduate and Professional Admissions at Pacific University, Oregon where she serves as the admissions counselor for the Doctor of Audiology program. Her specialty is creating meaningful relationships with students, creating goals, and setting students up for success.
    • Leigh Schaid AuD - Associate Professor
      Leigh G. Schaid, AuD, is an Associate Professor at Pacific University. She serves as a clinical provider, preceptor, and instructor in the AuD program. Her area of practice includes pediatric diagnostics, with a focus on the birth-three population. Her research interests focus on holistic review in health professions admissions. Currently, she is also pursuing a PhD in education and leadership through Pacific University.
    Summary
    Holistic review, an admissions strategy which considers applicant’s experiences and attributes along with traditional academic metrics, requires committees to evaluate subjective information (Artinian et al, 2017; AAMC Holistic Review Project, n.d.). To better ensure a calibrated, equitable process, the use of rubrics to guide reviews and interview performance are critical additions to admissions’ committee’s policies and procedures (De Los Reyes & Uddin, 2021). Through creation and use of effective rubrics, authors will demonstrate how one AuD program recruited applicants from diverse backgrounds. These efforts resulted in a matriculating cohort in which 63% of students identify as underrepresented and minority statuses.

    Learning Objectives:
  • List and describe the advantages of using rubrics during admissions reviews of both applications and interviews.
  • Relate the objectives of holistic review and the use of rubrics to current admissions practices and institutional values in your program.
  • Develop a new rubric and/or processes, or modify existing ones to better align with your institution’s mission, program goals and values.
  • Virtual Simulation-Based Training and Person-Centered Care (.1 CEUs)

    4/23/2022 Concurrent Sessions G

    Location
    Skyline I
    Speakers
    • Christen Page, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor
      Christen Guffey Page, PhD, CCC-SLP is an Assistant Professor for the communication disorders program at Eastern Kentucky University. She received a Ph.D. in Rehabilitation Sciences from the University of Kentucky in 2015. She has worked in adult rehabilitation in a variety of settings including inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation and skilled nursing facilities. Her research interests include interprofessional education, qualitative methods, and quality of life for residents in long-term care.
    • Kellie Ellis, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor/Department Chair
      Kellie Ellis, Ph.D CCC/SLP is an Associate Professor and Department Chair at Eastern Kentucky University. She teaches coursework in child language and speech sound disorders. Kellie is a former Chair of the Kentucky Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, Kentucky Speech-Language-Hearing Association (KSHA) President, and Chair of ASHA’s Governmental Relations/Public Policy Board. She currently serves as Faculty Representative on Kentucky’s Council on Postsecondary Education and as KSHA’s Governmental Relations Chair.
    • Morgan Blaydes, CF-SLP - SLP
      Morgan S. Blaydes is a speech-language pathologist completing her clinical fellowship at Meadowview Regional Medical Center in Maysville, KY. Morgan serves as an inpatient and outpatient speech therapist, treating a range of ages and disorders. Her research interests include graduate education/training and treatment for persons with dementia.
    Summary
    Person-centered care is instrumental in treatment of individuals with dementia. Despite this finding, research on the efficacy of training future speech-language pathologists to provide person-centered care for individuals with dementia is limited. Simulation-based education serves as one training method, but its effects of preparing students to treat persons with dementia using person-centered care is unknown. This mixed-methods study evaluated the difference in students’ treatment goals developed prior to and after participation in a virtual reality dementia experience to identify themes related to person-centered care. This presentation will describe the virtual simulation-based learning procedures and its relationship to person-centered care.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Describe the evidence supporting simulation-based learning.
  • List the steps and learning outcomes of a simulation-based learning activity for graduate speech-language pathology students.
  • Examine application of simulation-based learning to person-centered care for individuals with dementia.
  • Assessing IPP/IPE Practices (.15 CEUs)

    4/23/2022 Concurrent Sessions G

    Location
    Gallaria
    Speakers
    • Renee Bogschutz, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Director of Interprofessional Education
      Renée Bogschutz, PhD, CCC-SLP is the Founding Director of Interprofessional Education at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC). She provides the leadership, oversight, and operational support for the design, implementation, and ongoing evaluation of interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional collaborative practice (ICP) initiatives. After completing her PhD at the University of Iowa, Dr. Bogschutz joined the faculty at TTUHSC where she has taught and practiced in multiple collaborative-care clinics.
    Summary
    CSD programs are charged with the responsibility to embed IPP/IPE in the clinical training curriculum. Data illustrates the success of the IPP/IPE application. It is crucial that programs analyze and evaluate their IPP/IPE approaches to identify opportunities for improvement and ongoing practice. This session will provide examples of effective IPP/IPE training methods and applications to CSD programs.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Identifying and describing effective methods of assessing IPP/IPE in CSD curriculum.
  • Reviewing data that reflects outcomes of IPP/IPE in CSD programs.
  • Ideas for future infusion of standard and non-standard IPP/IPE practices into CSD curriculum.
  • Clinical Marketing 101 (.15 CEUs)

    4/23/2022 Concurrent Sessions G

    Location
    Broadway I/II/III
    Speakers
    • Kellsie Busho, AUD - Clinical Instructor
      Kellsie Busho, Au.D., CCC-A, is a Clinical Instructor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Iowa. Kellsie’s current responsibilities include clinical instruction of graduate students in Audiology in the areas of hearing loss, prevention and identification, diagnostic audiology, and aural rehabilitation in additon to overseeing University of Iowa Sound Awareness for Everyone (UISAFE).
    Summary
    University CSD clinics have a unique need to develop a diverse clinical population across the age span and representing a variety of diagnoses. Marketing priorities may vary across clinics and geographic locations, but general marketing principles can apply to address diverse clinical growth needs and priorities. This session will address clinical growth challenges and successful marketing approaches, including the use of social media platforms, to meet the needs of CSD clinics.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Identify clinical growth needs and purposes for marketing your university clinic.
  • Describe models of and barriers to marketing university clinical services.
  • Learn about marketing university clinical services on social media platforms.
  • Prioritizing Health Literacy in CSD Education (.15 CEUs)

    4/23/2022 Concurrent Sessions G

    Location
    Skyline II
    Speakers
    • M. Samantha Lewis, Ph.D. - Professor
      M. Samantha Lewis, PhD, CCC-A is a professor and the Academic Education Lead in the School of Audiology at Pacific University located in Hillsboro, Oregon. She was a Co-Principal Investigator on a VA Rehabilitation Research and Development (RR&D) Merit Review grant examining the use of simplified patient education tools on hearing-aid outcomes. She provides instruction on universal health literacy approaches to patient education at Pacific University.
    Summary
    Provider awareness of healthy literacy is a crucial component of quality health care delivery; thus, healthy literacy concepts and principles must be infused in CSD clinical training programs. This session will review health literacy from a CSD lens and provide methods for incorporating this needed concept into CSD curriculum.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Review the concept of health literacy and describe the responsibility of and priority for CSD programs to train future clinicians in health literacy awareness.
  • Review health literacy examples of academic course content and clinical application.
  • Identify opportunities to infuse health literacy concepts and application in current curriculum and clinical practice.
  • x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S15)

    4/23/2022 Concurrent Sessions G

    Location
    No Room

    The Value of Black and Brown Voices in Facilitating Inclusion in SLP/A (.1 CEUs)

    4/23/2022 Concurrent Sessions H

    Location
    Skyline I
    Speakers
    • Candice Adams-Mitchell, SLP.D., CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor
      Candice Adams-Mitchell SLP.D is an assistant professor and the Univ of Florida.
    • Charles Ellis, Jr., Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Professor/Chair
      Dr. Charles Ellis Jr., Ph.D. is a Professor and Chair of the Department of Speech-Language and Hearing Sciences at the University of Florida. Dr. Ellis received his BS and MS degrees from The University of Georgia Ph.D. from the University of Florida, Dr. Ellis was awarded the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Certificate of Recognition for Special Contribution in Multicultural Affairs in 2011. In 2014 he awarded Fellowship of the ASHA.
    Summary
    SLP/A programs traditionally enroll low numbers of students of color. Because Black and Brown practitioners make up less than 9% of the ASHA membership but 30% of the US population, the profession has made a concerted effort to recruit Black and Brown students into the profession. However, many continue to report a lack of inclusion in programs that consist of predominately White Females. In this presentation we will report themes related to inclusion reported by Hispanic/Latin students who engaged in a panel discussion. The findings offer information for specific strategies to improve inclusion among Black/Brown students enrolled in SLP/A programs.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the key factors that facilitate perceptions of inclusion among Black and Brown students enrolled in SLP/A at predominately white institutions (PWI).
  • Demonstrate an understanding of strategies to improve inclusion for Black and Brown students enrolled in SLP/A at PWI.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of resources needed to facilitate inclusion among Black and Brown students enrolled in SLP/A at PWI.
  • Connecting with Learners: Advancing Ongoing Use of Technology in the Classroom (.15 CEUs)

    4/23/2022 Concurrent Sessions H

    Location
    Gallaria
    Speakers
    • Carol Dudding, Ph.D. - Professor
      Carol Dudding, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is Professor at James Madison University. She holds a degree in Instructional Technology. Carol's areas of research centers on the uses of technology for clinical education and instruction, including simulations, telesupervision, and distance education. Carol is an ASHA Fellow, Certified Healthcare Simulation Educator, and Distinguished Fellow of the National Academies of Practice. She currently serves as Past - President of CAPCSD.
    Summary
    The COVID pandemic required those in education to refocus our efforts to engage students with a certain level of technology application in the classroom. As we move beyond the pandemic, there are a lot of lessons and benefits to learn from continuing to use technology to enhance our in-person teaching. This session will provide ideas and tools on how to best use technology in the classroom.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Review the benefits of technology as a tool to enhance efficient and effective learning.
  • Identify 2-3 technology-based tools applicable to CSD educational settings in teaching and colleague collaboration.
  • Provide examples for methods of infusing technology in face-to-face teaching.
  • Strategic Planning in Higher Education (.15 CEUs)

    4/23/2022 Concurrent Sessions H

    Location
    Atrium Ballroom
    Speakers
    • Jayne Brandel, PhD, CCC-SLP - Chair/Associate Professor
      Jayne Brandel is an Associate Profess and Chair of the CSD Departmenat at West Virginia University. As an ASHA-certified speech-language pathologist, her research interests are focused on increasing the use of research-based activities in the evaluation and treatment of language-based disorders in the schools. Additionally, she has begun to explore effective clinical instructional practices at the university level as well as regarding professional development activities.
    Summary
    Strategic planning is a common practice in university settings. These efforts are often required to align plans across the university hierarchy. Developing an effective strategic plan requires specific leadership skills. This session will lead a discussion on methods to increase faculty participation and buy-in to create a faculty-led plan.

    Learning Objectives:
  • List methods for effective strategic planning.
  • Understand the organizational structure of your university to align strategic plans across the organizational levels (i.e., university to college to department).
  • Identify a variety of solutions to barriers encountered when engaging in strategic planning.
  • Supporting Student Success in the Remediation Process (.15 CEUs)

    4/23/2022 Concurrent Sessions H

    Location
    Pavilion Ballroom
    Speakers
    • Anu Subramanian, PhD, CCC-SLP - Clinical Professor/Director of Clinical Programs-SLP
      Anu Subramanian, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is a clinical associate professor and director of clinical programs in SLP at the Dept of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Iowa. She supervises graduate students in stuttering and early childhood clinical placements. Her research interests are in clinical practice in early childhood, stuttering, and clinical education. Anu serves the CAPCSD clinical educator resources committee.
    • Jennifer Simpson, AuD, CCC-A - Clinical Professor/Associate Head
      Jennifer M. Simpson is a Clinical Professor and Associate Head in the Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences Department at Purdue University. She currently serves as the Vice President of Organizational Advancement on the CAPCSD Board of Directors. Her clinical interests include clinical education, pediatric diagnostic audiology and intervention, and administration.
    Summary
    CSD programs are responsible for graduating competent audiologists and speech-language pathologists. This involves tracking student academic knowledge and clinical skills throughout the program. At times, there may be students who perform below expected levels, unrelated to cultural diversity or identified accommodations. This requires the appropriate design of plans and implementation of remediation strategies for students to meet expected competencies prior to graduation. This session will provide information on remediation development, implementation, and completion.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Identify key components in an effective remediation plan.
  • Create measurable outcomes for student success in remediation.
  • Discuss strategies for supporting students throughout the process of remediation.
  • Trauma-Informed Clinical Supervision in Speech-Language Pathology (.15 CEUs)

    4/23/2022 Concurrent Sessions H

    Location
    Skyline II
    Speakers
    • Kelly Ann Pena, M.S., CCC-SLP, TSSLD, CBIS - Assistant Professor/Clinical Supervisor
      Kelly Ann Peña, M.S., CCC-SLP, TSSLD, CBIS is an assistant professor and clinical educator in the Master’s in Speech and Language Pathology program at Rutgers University-Newark. She has previously worked in medical settings with both adult and pediatric patients, including NICU, PICU, and inpatient rehabilitation. Kelly’s research interests include neurogenic communication disorders, bilingual language development, the intersection between justice and cognitive-communication, and clinical and research education.
    • Stephanie Hubbell, M.S., CCC-SLP - Director of Clinical Education
      Stephanie Hubbell, M.S., CCC-SLP, is the founding Director of Clinical Education in Rutgers University’s M.S. Program in Speech-Language Pathology. She specializes in trauma-informed, culturally-responsive, and interdisciplinary practice development. Stephanie teaches and practices primarily in the areas of autism and AAC and holds appointments at Yeshiva University, Speech@Emerson, and Rutgers.
    Summary
    We are living in unprecedented times and seeing the impacts on our campuses. In the midst of a two-year global health pandemic, and against the backdrop of the continued, devastating impacts of racism, political division, and humanitarian crises, students, staff, and faculty are experiencing trauma beyond the typical stressors that accompany college life. In this presentation, participants will learn common biological responses and behavioral reactions to traumatic events. Attendees will leave with tools that prepare them to implement a trauma-informed model of clinical supervision focused on psychological safety and empowerment to support student mental health and professional wellness.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Identify three sources of trauma our students, staff, and faculty may be encountering.
  • Describe two biological and two behavioral impacts of trauma on the individual.
  • Illustrate how the six principles of trauma-informed care can be applied to their clinical supervision practice.
  • x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S16)

    4/23/2022 Concurrent Sessions H

    Location
    No Room
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