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2023 Annual Conference Sessions

Connecting Culturally Diverse Students to Your University: Developing Solutions and Creating Action (.4 CEUs)

April 12 - Morning Pre-con (8:00 AM-12:00 PM)

Location
Salon II
Speakers
  • Kia Johnson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Associate Director
    Kia Noelle Johnson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is the Associate Director of the Blank Center for Stuttering Education and Research - Atlanta Satellite with University of Texas at Austin. She specializes in developmental stuttering and is a growing leader diversity, equity, and inclusion in clinical and professional settings. She serves as Chair of the Board of Directors for NBASLH and is a member of the ASHA Board of Ethics,
Summary
The foundation has been provided solidifying the importance of providing equitable support to underrepresented culturally diverse students in academic CSD programs as well as the value in connecting those students to the university and local community. This working session will provide attendees with a focused opportunity to explore challenges to providing this support and – more importantly – develop realistic solutions and actionable items to create a more inclusive environment for current and future students.

Learning Objectives
  • Identify specific challenges items to improve inclusivity for underrepresented culturally diverse students in their specific CSD program.
  • Identify solutions to address challenges that impact the ability to improve inclusivity for underrepresented culturally diverse students in their specific CSD program.
  • Provide specific action items that can be presented to their academic department for consideration to implement for the next academic year.
  • Billing 101: How to Teach Students Best Practices and Ethics for Billing (.4 CEUs)

    April 12 - Afternoon Pre-con (1:30-5:30 PM)

    Location
    Salon I
    Speakers
    • Dee Adams Nikjeh, Ph.D. CCC-SLP ASHA Fellow - Health Care Economics Committee, Co-Chair, Healthcare Coding and Claims Consultant
      Dee Adams Nikjeh, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, ASHA Fellow, is an expert in health care code sets, compliance requirements, and billing practices for the field of speech-language pathology (SLP). She co-chairs ASHA's Health Care Economics Committee and is the SLP advisor on the American Medical Association's Relative Value Update Committee/Health Care Professionals Advisory Review Board. Dr. Nikjeh's professional career spans four decades as a clinician, researcher, educator, advocate, consultant, and expert witness.
    • Mark DeRuiter, MBA, Ph.D., (he/him/his) - Professor
      Mark DeRuiter MBA, Ph.D., is Professor and Vice Chair for Academic Affairs in the department of Communication Science and Disorders at the University of Pittsburgh. He has held varied higher education CSD roles including clinic director, graduate program director, and associate department head. Mark serves on the CAPCSD Board, ASHA's Health Care Economics Committee, as well as the Founding Editorial Board of Teaching and Learning in Communication Sciences and Disorders.
    Summary
    We must understand how to implement billing procedures in order to get reimbursed for our services. This is essential information for CSD graduate students to understand prior to graduation. This session will describe the essential billing information that must be imparted to CSD students and will provide strategies for effectively teaching this information.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe the legal and ethical information that must be imparted to CSD students.
  • Implement best-practice strategies for teaching billing fundamentals to students.
  • Identify resources for up to date billing information.
  • Developing, Retaining, and Empowering a Diverse, Positive, and Productive Faculty Team (.4 CEUs)

    April 12 - Afternoon Pre-con (1:30-5:30 PM)

    Location
    Salon II
    Speakers
    • Celeste Domsch, Ph.D., (she/her/hers) - Associate Professor and Program Director
      Celeste Domsch, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an Associate Professor and Program Director for Speech-Language Pathology in the Department of Rehabilitation and Movement Sciences at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. The SLP Program is housed on the Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences campus in Newark, NJ. Dr. Domsch is the current Editor-in-Chief for Group 4 Perspectives of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
    • Valarie B. Fleming, Ph.D. CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Assistant Vice President, Curriculum and Academic Programs
      Valarie B. Fleming, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is Assistant Vice President for Curriculum and Academic programs and a tenured professor of communication disorders at Texas State University. She provides leadership in curriculum and commencement that includes developing new academic programs, performing research and data analytics, planning and implementing commencement ceremonies. Dr. Fleming currently serves on the American Speech-Language-Hearing (ASHA) Academic Affairs Board and on the ASHA Committee of Ambassadors.
    Summary
    Building, retaining, and developing a cohesive, productive CSD staff and faculty member team requires ongoing commitment and innovation. This session will provide strategies for successfully recruiting and retaining CSD staff and faculty team members. Once faculty and staff are in place, the focus shifts to development and empowerment of both individuals and the unit. Developing a virtuous cycle where everyone, including students, has opportunities to be successful is in our own best interests since CSD students become CSD faculty. Time will be spent in this session discussing how CSD programs can identify their own strengths and build on those.

    Leaning Objectives
  • Identify resources for recruiting and retaining a diverse and cohesive team,
  • Identify barriers to effective teamwork and discuss potential solutions for overcoming these barriers.
  • Implement strategies for fostering teamwork within a CSD program.
  • x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S1)

    April 12 - Newcomers' Orientation (5:30-6:00 PM)

    Location
    No Room

    Newcomers' Orientation

    April 12 - Newcomers' Orientation (5:30-6:00 PM)

    Summary
    Join the 2022-2023 CAPCSD President and the Conference Chair for a orientation to the conference for first time participants.

    Welcome Reception

    April 12 - Welcome Reception (6:00-8:00 PM)

    Summary
    CAPCSD 2023 Annual Conference Welcome Reception

    x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S2)

    April 12 - Welcome Reception (6:00-8:00 PM)

    Location
    No Room

    Stress Management and Mental Wellness in Academia (.15 CEUs)

    April 13 - Plenary 1 (7:50-10:00 AM)

    Location
    Salon IV-IX
    Speakers
    • Jeff Buller, Ph.D. - Senior Partner
      Jeffrey L. Buller is a senior partner in ATLAS: Academic Training, Leadership, and Assessment Services. He is the author of over twenty-five books on academic leadership, a textbook for first year college students, several novels, and a book on the music dramas of Richard Wagner. Dr. Buller has also written numerous articles and monographs on Greek and Latin literature, opera, and college administration.
    Summary
    Academic professionals are experiencing more stress than ever before. Increased workload, activist legislatures and governing boards, shrinking budgets, and numerous other challenges have caused many faculty members and administrators to leave higher education entirely. Others simply suffer in silence. In this session, we'll explore practical steps people can take to deal more effectively with the stresses of academic life today and consider how to develop a tailored self-care plan to suit each of our individual needs.

    Learning Objectives
  • Address stress more effectively by developing an individual plan to avoid, manage, cope with, or embrace stress, depending on its nature and the challenges one faces.
  • Understand why self-care is an important prerequisite to caring for students, colleagues, and other stakeholders in higher education.
  • Distinguish between different types of stress triggers and recognize why certain stress-management strategies are ineffective in 'disarming' those triggers.
  • x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S3)

    April 13 - Plenary 1 (7:50-10:00 AM)

    Location
    No Room

    ACAE - Accreditation for an Autonomous Audiology Profession (.1 CEUs)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions A (10:30-11:30 AM)

    Speakers
    • Carol G. Cokely, Ph.D., (she/her/hers) - Clinical Professor & AuD Program Head
      Carol Cokely, Ph.D., is clinical professor and AuD Program Head in the Department of SLH at the University of Texas at Dallas. She has a long-term commitment to andragogy of clinical and classroom education and program assessment. She is the current ACAE Vice President of the Board of Directors, a past member of the boards of the AAA and ARA and has served on numerous committees within AAA and CAPCSD.
    Summary
    This session will present ongoing work and updates of the Accreditation Commission for Audiology Education (ACAE). Current ACAE standards, processes of accreditation and re-accreditation will be reviewed. The session will highlight the importance of stewardship of the quality of audiology education in the current healthcare environment as well as for the autonomy of the profession.

    Learning Objectives
  • Identify the process of accreditation for new programs and existing programs.
  • Identify how ACAE promotes and reinforces high-quality performance in AuD education programs.
  • Identify ongoing and new initiatives of the ACAE.
  • A Clinical Education Round Table: Framing the Barriers to Evidence-based Graduate Supervision (.1 CEUs)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions A (10:30-11:30 AM)

    Speakers
    • Andy Clare, M.S. CCC-SLP CBIS, (he/him/his) - Assistant Director of Clinical Education
      Andy Clare, MS CCC-SLP CBIS, is the Assistant Director of Clinical Education at the GWU Department of Speech & Hearing Sciences. He is the current chair of the CAPCSD Clinical Education committee. At GWU, he oversees the coordination of graduate externship placements. His research interests focus on the pedagogy of clnicial education. His areas of clinical expertise include Dysphagia, Aphasia and Cognitive-Linguistic Disorders.
    Summary
    With a discussion based format, this session will focus on identifying issues related to clinical education in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology. By eliciting the perspectives of the various partners in the process (from administrators to preceptors), we will frame the various barriers to the utilization of best-practice approaches to supervision, in order to clarify the needs of our academic communities moving forwards. In addition, the range of currently available continuing education opportunities for content related to clinical education will be reviewed.

    Learning Objectives
  • Identify 3 specific resources for evidence-based continuing education for clinical educators.
  • Define at least 2 barriers to the use of practical, evidence-based clinical education approaches.
  • Differentiate between the varying educational and administrative needs of those parties engaging in the clinical education process.
  • Culturally Responsive Mentorship & the Hidden Curriculum (.1 CEUs)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions A (10:30-11:30 AM)

    Speakers
    • Laura L. Wolford, Ph.D., M.S. CCC-SLP, CSE, (she/her) - Assistant Professor
      Laura Wolford, Ph.D., MS, CCC-SLP, CSE is an Assistant Professor at MGH Institute of Health Professions, where she teaches courses on clinical supervision, counseling, and the scholarship of teaching and learning through a social justice lens. As director of the TASSEL (Teaching and Supporting Student Experience in Learning) lab, Dr. Wolford promotes mixed-methods teaching and learning research in the health professions, focusing on improving the student experience.
    • Maria V. Dixon, M.A., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Clinical Professor
      Maria V. Dixon is a Clinical Professor at Arizona State University. She coordinates school-based practicum experiences. Maria is the Program Director for the Interdisciplinary Multicultural Professional Autism Clinical Training (IMPACT) Program training grant. She co-founded the Employment Assistance and Social Engagement (EASE) program serving ASU students with autism. She was a clinical Faculty member at Purdue University and the University of Maryland at College Park.
    Summary
    Abstract: The hidden curriculum is a barrier to students from racialized, disabled, or otherwise minoritized backgrounds and challenges a sense of belonging in graduate school. Relational mentorship has been shown to improve this sense of belonging and well-being. In this presentation, the hidden curriculum will be described from the vantage point of cultural perpetuation. Relational mentorship will serve as a guide for faculty to provide culturally-responsive mentorship with students from cultures different from their own. Cross-field research into relational models of mentorship and the graduate student experience will be discussed.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe how aspects of the multicultural-ecological-relational model of mentorship can help students from all backgrounds feel engaged and integrated into the program and the field.
  • Identify at least 2 aspects of the hidden curriculum in their program or externship locations.
  • Discuss how identifying racialized bias in the hidden curriculum can reduce its perpetuation.
  • Diving into the CSDCAS Data: Benefits to Programs, Universities, and the Profession (.1 CEUs)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions A (10:30-11:30 AM)

    Speakers
    • Douglas F. Parham, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Chair and Program Director
      Douglas F. Parham, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is the Chair and Program Director of the Department of CSD at Wichita State University. He is the SLP representative for Kansas on ASHA's Committee of Ambassadors and a Site Visitor for ASHA's Council on Academic Accreditation. He is a member of CAPCSD's CSDCAS Committee. He is a Past President of the Kansas Speech-Language-Hearing Association and the Council of State Speech-Language-Hearing Association Presidents.
    • Laura Plexico, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Chair
      Laura Plexico, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is a Professor and Chair in the Communication Disorders Department at Auburn University. She teaches courses in fluency disorders, counseling, and speech science. Her research concentrates on psychosocial aspects of stuttering, communicative interaction, and the processes of personal change.
    • Radhika Aravamudhan, Ph.D., CCC-A - Dean
      Dr. Aravamudhan serves as the Dean of Osborne College of Audiology at Salus University in Pennsylvania. Dr. Aravamudhan previously served as an academic audiology member and the Vice Chair for Audiology on the CAA. She currently serves on the Academic Affairs Board for ASHA and an incoming Vice President for Academic Affairs-Audiology on ASHA Board. She also serves on CAPCSD'S admission committee.
    • Steffany M. Chleboun, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Professor
      Steffany M Chleboun, Ph.D.., CCC-SLP is a Professor and Graduate Program Director at Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville. She has taught both graduate and undergraduate courses. Her research interests include working with individuals living with acquired brain injury and aphasia. She has worked in the hospital setting as a speech-language pathologist and has experience working with adults and children with a variety of acquired communication disorders.
    Summary
    With over 75% of SLP and AUD programs participating, the data set available from the centralized application service (CSDCAS) allows us to compile statistics on the number of applicants, designations, matriculation, and applicant pool profile (e.g., ethnicity, geographic, and economic demographics). Understanding applicant pools and enrollment outcomes are critical to recruitment strategies and developing projections for our field, in addition to the health of individual professional programs. In this session, we will explore and interpret national data, provide demonstrations for running reports at the program level, and discuss how data might be used in admissions decisions, planning, and future development.

    Learning Objectives
  • Run WebAdmit reports on their applicant pool.
  • Describe recent national trends in SLP and AuD applicant data.
  • Describe trends in diversity of applicants regionally.
  • Pursuing a Terminal Degree: Non-csd Options (.1 CEUs)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions A (10:30-11:30 AM)

    Speakers
    • Heidi Verticchio, M.S. - Clinic Director & Director of Academic Advisement
      Heidi Verticchio, M.S., CCC-SLP, is the Clinic Director and Director of Advisement in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Illinois State University. Heidi’s primary responsibilities include managing the business operations of the on-campus Eckelmann-Taylor Speech and Hearing Clinic. Additionally, Heidi is the academic advisor for graduate students in the Master’s in Speech-Language Pathology and the Clinical Doctorate in Audiology programs.
    • Teresa Anthony, MHA, MA, CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Ph.D. student in Public Health, Health Services Research
      Teresa Anthony, MHA, MA, CCC-SLP, Ph.D. student in Public Health, Health Services Research at the University of South Florida (USF), aims to improve access to care for individuals with disabilities. She is former faculty and Clinic Director at USF. Teresa serves on ASHA and FLASHA Medicaid committees and is a proud alumnus of ASHA’s 2018 Healthcare LDP and CAPCSD's 2019 Leadership Academy. Teresa works for a healthcare technology firm.
    Summary
    CSD faculty may consider completing a terminal degree (Ph.D./Ed.D.) in an area other than their area of clinical training. This presentation will cover different potential educational options and the benefits to career growth and development for faculty. Also discussed will be the advantages and disadvantages of completing a residential program at your home institution versus through a distance learning program.

    Learning Objectives
  • State various options for non-CSD terminal degrees.
  • List potential benefits of completing a degree in an area different from their clinical training.
  • Compare residential versus distance learning options for terminal degrees.
  • Religious Accommodations for Students and Faculty (.1 CEUs)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions A (10:30-11:30 AM)

    Speakers
    • Travis T. Threats, Ph.D., (he/him/his) - Professor and Chair
      Travis T. Threats, Ph.D. is Professor and Chair of the Department of Speech, Language & Hearing Sciences at Saint Louis University. His primary scholarly work has been with the World Health Organization (WHO) on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Dr. Threats has also published and presented internationally on his three other scholarly interests: spirituality/religiosity in rehabilitation, evidence-based practice, and rehabilitation ethics.
    Summary
    Religious diversity is often not included in discussion of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) issues in education of health care professionals. There are a variety of religions and even within a given religion there are a wide variety of belief systems. In addition, the centrality or daily importance of religion to a given faculty or student also varies widely. This session will focus on understanding the issues and possible challenges of respecting the observation of religious practices in the light of clinical and classroom requirements, ASHA ethical guidelines, and in keeping with university policies.

    Learning Objectives
  • Demonstrate understanding the underlying constructs for religion in order to better appreciate differences.
  • Demonstrate understanding of religion via a DEI lens.
  • Identify challenges and approaches to better address different religious beliefs in academic communication disorders programs.
  • Team Building & Teamwork (.1 CEUs)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions A (10:30-11:30 AM)

    Speakers
    • Jeff Buller, Ph.D. - Senior Partner
      Jeffrey L. Buller is a senior partner in ATLAS: Academic Training, Leadership, and Assessment Services. He is the author of over twenty-five books on academic leadership, a textbook for first year college students, several novels, and a book on the music dramas of Richard Wagner. Dr. Buller has also written numerous articles and monographs on Greek and Latin literature, opera, and college administration.
    Summary
    This interactive workshop explores strategies for developing collegiality and teamwork within academic units. Beginning with information about what collegiality is, what U.S. courts have decided about collegiality, how to conduct constructive discussions of collegiality, we shall then build from the concept of collegiality to building effective academic team and explore proven strategies for promoting teamwork at the unit and institutional levels.

    Learning Objectives
  • Understand why civility is an essential prerequisite for collegiality and why collegiality is an essential prerequisite for teamwork.
  • Develop a practical plan, tailored to the needs of their units, for building an effective, mutually supportive team.
  • Recognize best practices in overcoming the obstacles to effective teamwork that often exist n higher education.
  • Under Pressure! Perfectionism, Impulse, Success, and Academic Integrity: The Clock's Ticking! (.1 CEUs)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions A (10:30-11:30 AM)

    Speakers
    • Crystal A. Murphree-Holden, MA, CCC-SLP - Assistant Clinical Professor/Director of Distance Education
      Crystal Murphree-Holden, M.A., CCC-SLP, is Director of Distance Education in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of South Carolina. She serves as licensure liaison for the SC Speech-Languge-Hearing Association (SCSHA) and previously served as chair of CAPCSD Distance Education Committee. As a distance learning administrator, clinical educator and IPP/IPE course facilitator, she has 35+ years of clinical and professional practice experience in a variety of settings.
    • Renee Wendel, M.S., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Assistant Clinical Professor/Director of Clinical Education
      Renee Wendel, M.S.,CCC is a Clinical Asst Professor and Director of Clinical Education in the Department of Communication Disorders at TXST University. Her service and teaching has been recognized, having been awarded the College's Presidential Excellence Award in Service in 2005, 2010, and 2021. She was a recipient of the College of Health Professions Presidential Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2015. Renee teaches Advanced Clinical Practicum and Internship in Communication Disorders.
    Summary
    The purpose of this talk is to initiate overdue dialogue about academic integrity in CSD Graduate Programs. Mainstream media and niche publications (the Chronicle) are filled with reports of academic dishonesty. Approximately 90% of students cheat at the high school and college-level (Hobbs 2021). Faculty are reluctant to acknowledge that dishonesty exists, avoiding emotional and time-consuming confrontations (Vittrupp, 2016). This talk will explore behaviors of dishonesty, how they translate into practice and ultimately influence ethical outcomes and professional integrity. Strategies to curtail cheating and other dishonest behavior will be presented. The need for pedagogical and programmatic changes will be examined.

    Learning Objectives
  • List two examples of academic integrity issues and explain how motives associated with these behaviors in the classroom/workplace are detrimental to the profession.
  • Identify two immediate changes that can be implemented into current pedagogical practices to curtail academic dishonesty.
  • Identify and describe key strategies for ethical decision-making given scenarios involving academic integrity.
  • A Community-based Interprofessional and Multimodal Clinical Education Model (.1 CEUs)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions A (10:30-11:30 AM)

    Speakers
    • Bethany Walker, M.S., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Clincal Coordinator & Clinical Assistant Professor
      Bethany Walker is the Clinical Coordinator and Clinical Assistant Professor for Jacksonville University Palm Coast. Ms. Walker has served as a clinician in a variety of settings with experience in acute care, schools and early intervention. She has experience in administration, outpatient and inpatient rehabilitation. Bethany is active in the SLP community with a career focus in training and learning about multicultural issues and how to best serve these populations.
    Summary
    School practicum experiences can vary greatly and seem overwhelming to new graduate clinicians. Implementation of an organizational clinical supervision framework may have a positive effect on clinical supervision (Garner et al., 2022). A school district SLP program created an internship protocol includes opportunities for a variety of clinical tasks. Tasks included a systematic series of companion activities, engagement with dual-language learners, audiological evaluations, special population classrooms, and an opportunity to interview with an administrator to develop critical thinking and professionalism. This layered approach will provide students with optimum exposure to multifaceted school-based tasks to instill confidence for pursuing school-based employment.

    Learning Objectives
  • Examine the spectrum of experience that are possible to provide during a school-based clinical practicum.
  • Discuss how an interdisciplinary practicum contributes to a more robust and holistic school-based practicum experience.
  • Identify clinical tasks and activities that can be added to a school-based practicum to build confidence and professionalism.
  • x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S4)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions A (10:30-11:30 AM)

    A Model of Clinical Education Focused on Literacy Instruction Within Kindergarten Classrooms (.05 CEUs)

    April 13 - Posters A (11:30 AM-12:00 PM)

    Location
    Center Foyer
    Speakers
    • Jade H. Robinson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Program Coordinator; Associate Professor
      Jade Robinson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an Associate Professor in Communication Sciences & Disorders (CSD) at Eastern Kentucky University. Jade serves as CSD Program Coordinator and CSD Coordinator for the Autism Certificate Program. Her clinical research interests include language and emergent literacy development, early intervention, and caregiver-implemented strategies that facilitate language development. She teaches a variety of courses, including language development, language assessment, diagnostics, school-based services, and augmentative & alternative communication.
    Summary
    This presentation will illustrate a practicum experience embEd.D.ed within a School Services course for senior-level students. The experience involves weekly instruction provided by student clinicians within three inclusive kindergarten classrooms. During Fall Semester, new sounds and their corresponding letters are introduced each week. The focus shifts to introducing new word families during Spring Semester. The clinicians first introduce the week's learning targets during large group instruction and then break into small groups to provide emergent literacy instruction. This model of clinical education provides opportunities for students to work within classroom environments, differentiate instruction for various learners, and collaborate with educators.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe a clinical education model of embEd.D.ed instruction within inclusive classroom settings.
  • Identify action steps to develop and implement a clinical model in collaboration with classroom teachers.
  • Embed clinical opportunities within undergraduate coursework to better prepare students for graduate-level practicum experiences.
  • An Evidence-based Approach to Comprehensive Clinical Writing Instruction (.05 CEUs)

    April 13 - Posters A (11:30 AM-12:00 PM)

    Location
    Center Foyer
    Speakers
    • Amanda Mahoney, M.A., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Speech-language pathologist, Graduate Research Assistant
      Amanda Mahoney, CCC-SLP, is a 5th year Ph.D. student in the Communication Science and Disorders department at the University of Pittsburgh. Along with her pursuit of researching and improving her skills in pedagogy, Amanda researches feeding interventions for preterm and medically fragile infants and their caregivers' experiences.
    • Erin EG Lundblom, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Coordinator of SLP Clinical Education and Associate Professor
      Erin E.G. Lundblom is an Associate Professor and Director of Speech-Language Pathology Clinical Education at the University of Pittsburgh. She provides course instruction to both undergraduate and graduate students. Her areas of interest encompass best practice in the provision of clinical instruction, school-based language and literacy services including service delivery options, and higher education pedagogy.
    • Erin Lucatorto, MA, CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Speech-language pathologist, Graduate Research Assistant
      Erin Lucatorto, MA, CCC-SLP is a speech-language pathologist and Ph.D. student in the Department of Communication Science and Disorders at the University of Pittsburgh. She earned an MA in speech-language pathology from the University of Pittsburgh in 2015. Erin’s primary research interests are in computational analysis of swallowing and swallowing disorders in organ transplant, cardiothoracic surgery, and other critical illness patient populations and implementation science.
    Summary
    Clinical writing competency is an essential component of practice for speech-language pathologists and audiologists. Research suggests that many students entering graduate programs in these fields are unfamiliar with clinical terminology and lack the foundational knowledge to formulate clear, concise, organized, and unbiased documentation. This study trialed a comprehensive, systematic, evidence-based teaching approach with undergraduates enrolled in a CSD clinical writing course. Students were instructed on grammar, relevant clinical terminology, and overall clarity. This poster documents our methodology and student improvement in these areas throughout the course.

    Learning Objectives
  • List 3 aspects of clinical writing that many students entering graduate programs lack.
  • Explain the importance of clinical writing instruction for undergraduates.
  • Describe 2 components of the proposed teaching approach explored in this study.
  • Aural Rehabilitation Through “DMs”: Service Delivery Using an Asynchronous Direct Messaging Model (.05 CEUs)

    April 13 - Posters A (11:30 AM-12:00 PM)

    Location
    Center Foyer
    Speakers
    • Aimee Q. Adams, M.A., CCC-SLP - Clinic Director
      Aimee Q. Adams, MA, CCC-SLP is the Clinic Director for the Southeastern Louisiana University Speech, Language & Hearing Clinic. She is a clinical supervisor, course instructor and oversees the Louisiana Scottish Rite Foundation grant at Southeastern Louisiana University. She teaches coursework in clinical diagnostics and clinical practicum.
    • Aleah Arseneault, B.S., (she/her/hers) - Graduate Student Clinician
      Aleah DuBose completed her B.A. in Speech and Hearing Sciences from the University of Southern Mississippi and is currently pursuing a M.S. in Communication Sciences and Disorders at Southeastern Louisiana University. Her interests include aural rehabilitation, childhood apraxia of speech, augmentative and alternative communication, and adult neurogenic disorders.
    • Chele M. Landry, B.S., (she/her/hers) - Graduate Student Clinician
      Chele Landry completed her B.S. in Psychology from Loyola University New Orleans and is currently pursuing a M.S. in Communication Sciences and Disorders at Southeastern Louisiana University. Her clinical interests include adult neurogenic disorders, dysphagia, aural rehabilitation, and autism spectrum disorder.
    Summary
    The purpose of this single-subject study is to evaluate the effectiveness of an adolescent aural rehabilitation program designed and administered through asynchronous telepractice delivery. The main objective was to improve overall speech intelligibility in an adolescent with severe bilateral conductive hearing loss. The program consisted of patient education, asynchronous intervention tasks, evaluation of progress, feedback, and development of self-advocacy skills. Results are ongoing, but have thus far yielded an increase in speech intelligibility and self-advocacy skills. The participant has demonstrated expansion of knowledge regarding conductive hearing loss, increased articulatory precision, and implementation of self-advocacy skills.

    Learning Objectives
  • Discuss importance of offering asynchronous telepractice as an alternative service delivery model to expand service provision.
  • Discuss importance of integrating self-advocacy skills training into therapeutic sessions.
  • Discuss outcomes of aural rehabilitation delivered via asynchronous telepractice.
  • Benefits of Infusing IPP/IPE into an Undergraduate AAC Clinical Course (.05 CEUs)

    April 13 - Posters A (11:30 AM-12:00 PM)

    Location
    Center Foyer
    Speakers
    • Carol Zombotti, ClinScD, CCC-SLP, BCBA, (she/her/hers) - Clinical Director and Assistant Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders
      Carol Zombotti is a Clinic Director/Assistant Professor at West Liberty University. She holds degrees from West Virginia University (SLP), Penn State University (ABA), and Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions (Doctorate in SLP). She is a certified SLP and BCBA. An SLP for 29 years, she also works in private practice and early intervention. Her areas of interest include AAC, autism, social communication, childhood apraxia of speech, and early intervention.
    • Sara J. Alig, M.S. CCC-SLP, CDP, (she/her/hers) - Director of Clinical Education
      Sara J. Alig, MS CCC-SLP, CDP is a medical SLP, certified dementia practitioner, and assistant professor of Communication Sciences & Disorders at West Liberty University. Sara is a Ph.D. candidate, studying caregiver perspectives of health communication regarding dementia. Sara is passionate about infusing IPP throughout curriculum, because her 20+ years of experience has revolved around making a difference in the lives of her clients as a member of interdisciplinary teams.
    Summary
    The research is clear that being proactive about implementing IPP/IPE into CSD courses is beneficial for all the students in the collaborating programs. The West Liberty University Speech & Hearing Clinic was granted funds to implement a high-tech AAC lab with goals to prepare students in CSD programs for working with underserved populations in rural WV and to incorporate IPE about AAC concepts into other programs at WLU. The poster will feature results of data collected through surveys, looking closely at the perspective of CSD, education, psychology, social work, and nursing students, regarding the effectiveness of the IPE model.

    Learning Objectives
  • Critique the analysis of data taken from a CSD program’s research in the use of IPP/IPE with AAC concepts.
  • Identify collaborating programs that may benefit from IPE in a CSD AAC concepts course.
  • Apply a working model for infusing IPP/IPE into an undergraduate CSD AAC concepts course.
  • Comparing Prospective Student and Faculty Perceptions of Collaborative Game-based Admission Interviews (.05 CEUs)

    April 13 - Posters A (11:30 AM-12:00 PM)

    Location
    Center Foyer
    Speakers
    • Alisha P. Springle, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, BCS-CL, (she/her/) - Assistant Professor of Speech Language Pathology
      Alisha Springle, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, BCS-CL, is an Assistant Professor at Indiana University - South Bend. She is a Board Certified Specialist in Child Language Disorders; has taught and supervised SLP students for 8 years; has 17 years of experience working as an SLP. Her research interests focus on treatment of comorbid developmental language disorders, childhood apraxia of speech, and the process of teaching and learning in communication sciences and disorders.
    • Jennifer Hatfield, MHS, CCC-SLP, Ed.D. (c), (she/her/hers) - Clinical Assistant Professor of Speech Language Pathology
      Jennifer Hatfield MHS,ccc/slp, (c) Ed.D. is a clinical assistant professor of speech language pathology in the Vera Z Dwyer College of Health Sciences at Indiana University South Bend. She also continues to work in her private practice of over 24 years providing private therapy and conducting disability evaluations for the state of Indiana. Her current research focuses on student perceptions of online course design and online pedagogy.
    Summary
    Creating a diverse and inclusive population of SLPs begins with reducing admission barriers for underrepresented students. CSD programs are increasingly implementing holistic processes, including interviews. Such interviews allow for more unbiased assessment of applicant strengths, such as communication and reasoning abilities. Other medical fields, such as nursing and physician programs, have implemented group interviews in an escape room format. We will present an outline of an SLP-admissions escape room interview process, comparing applicant feelings pre- and post-interview with the facilitator's assessments. Applicants reported increased comfort during the interview and all involved agreed that the process was fair.

    Learning Objectives
  • Review faculty perceptions of a gamified small group interview.
  • Discuss student perceptions of the escape room interview process.
  • Describe benefits and disadvantages of escape rooms as the interview portion of an admission application.
  • Conflict Management in the Supervisory Process (.05 CEUs)

    April 13 - Posters A (11:30 AM-12:00 PM)

    Location
    Center Foyer
    Speakers
    • Steven Moates, SLP.D., CCC-SLP - Clinical Outreach Director/Clinical Assistant Professor
      Dr. Steven Moates is a Clinical Assistant Professor and Clinical Outreach Director for the Speech@Baylor Online Program at Baylor University in Waco, TX. Responsibilities include management of the clinical operations of the Speech@Baylor Online Program and clinical teaching. Dr. Moates also serves as a Regional Chapter Coordiator (RCC) and on the Special Topics Committee for the National Stuttering Association.
    Summary
    Conflict is inevitable with individuals engaging in the supervisory process (McCrea & Brasseur, 2003; McKibben, 2017; Victor, 2013). Unless conflict management is successfully managed by the parties involved, it can result in negative outcomes for the student (Kantek & Gezer, 2008; Mamchur & Myrick, 2003). This study used the Rahim Organizational Conflict Inventory-II (ROC II) to measure conflict management styles used by CSD graduate students in conflict with clinical faculty supervisors and off-campus supervisors during their clinical practicum experiences. Results and conclusions are discussed. Information can be used to create a healthy learning environment and positive student outcomes.

    Learning Objectives
  • Identify CSD graduate students' perceptions of their conflict status.
  • Identify conflict management styles used by CSD graduate students in conflict with their clinical faculty and/or off-campus supervisors.
  • Identify the graduate students' perceived level of success with each conflict management style.
  • Creating a Student Community Outreach Program of Excellence: A Full-service Pro-bono Clinic (.05 CEUs)

    April 13 - Posters A (11:30 AM-12:00 PM)

    Location
    Center Foyer
    Speakers
    • Amy Winston, AuD, CCC-A - Audiology Program Director
      Amy K. Winston, AuD, is Director of the Doctor of Audiology Program at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, IL. She is an Assistant Professor and clinical audiologist, providing didactic and clinical education in the program. Her primary clinical and teaching interests lie in the area of vestibular testing and rehabilitation. Amy graduated from Harvard University with an AB in 1989; she received her AuD from Rush University in 2007.
    • Doreen K. Izaguirre, MA, CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Faculty/Clinical Education Manager
      Doreen Kelly Izaguirre, MA, CCC-SLP, is the SLP Clinical Education Manager at Rush University. She is also a practicing SLP in the medical center with more than 25 years experience, specializing in the care of patients with tracheotomies and ventilator dependence. Additionally, she is a Ph.D. student at Rush University. Her research is a comparison of swallowing disorders between Hispanic and non-Hispanic white patients with Parkinson's disease.
    • Emily Q. Wang, Ph.D., (she/her/hers) - Associate Professor & Dept. Chairperson
      Dr. Emily Wang, is an Associate Professor, Department Chair, Founder of the SCOPE Clinic, and a Speech‐Language Pathologist at Rush University, Rush University Medical Center. She received her clinical and research training from University Connecticut and the renowned Haskins Laboratories, Yale University. She is a life-time member of ASHA. Her clinical and research interest is in motor speech and dysphagia associated with neurodegenerative diseases with an emphasis on Parkinson’s disease.
    • Megan Worthington, AuD, CCC-A, (she/her/hers) - Assistant Professor/ Audiology Clinical Education Manager
    • Shannon M. Theis, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor & SLP Program Director
      Shannon M. Theis, Ph.D, is an Assistant Professor and SLP Program Director with the Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences at Rush University in Chicago, IL. Dr. Theis has specialized in caring for children with feeding/swallowing difficulties, voice and resonance disorders, and craniofacial anomalies/cleft lip and palate for 20+ years. Dr. Theis is an active clinical researcher and has published several articles related to pediatric voice and feeding disorders.
    Summary
    This session describes how we obtained institution and community support to successfully build the Student Community Outreach Program of Excellence (SCOPE) Speech & Hearing Clinic, a student-run, pro-bono training clinic, to meet two essential program goals: 1) To provide much-needed Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology services to uninsured/underinsured and under-represented minority (URM) patients in an inclusive environment to benefit patients and support student clinical training. 2)To develop an ongoing outreach program that serves the local community, provides a unique experience for Rush students, and reinforces for URM students how much their special expertise is needed by our patients and professions.

    Learning Objectives
  • State the two essential goals of a student pro-bono training clinic that your community leaders and university administrators will adopt.
  • Describe the essential steps to take to build a successful student-run pro-bono speech & hearing training clinic.
  • Describe the essential steps to take to build a stable, variable, sizeable, and sustainable patient referral base in your community.
  • Engaging CSD Students in University-wide Interprofessional Education Experiences Using Simulation (.05 CEUs)

    April 13 - Posters A (11:30 AM-12:00 PM)

    Location
    Center Foyer
    Speakers
    • Mara Steinberg Lowe, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, (she/her) - Assistant Professor
      Mara Steinberg Lowe, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is an Assistant Professor at CUNY Queens College in the department of Linguistics and Communication Disorders. Her research focuses on two main areas: exploring cognitive skills and language processing in unimpaired individuals and people with acquired neurogenic communication disorders and developing interprofessional training experiences for learners at all levels.
    • Patricia McCaul, M.A., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Program Director for Graduate Program in Speech Language Pathology
      Patricia McCaul, M.A., CCC-SLP, is the Director for the Graduate Program in Speech Language Pathology in the Department of Linguistics and Communication Disorders at Queens College, CUNY. Ms. McCaul has over 30 years experience specializing in the treatment of pediatric neuromotor speech and feeding disorders, particulary in the area of cerebral palsy. Her interests include clinical mentorship and effective supervision models in clinical training.
    • Patricia Simino Boyce, Ph.D., RN, (she/her/hers) - University Dean for Health and Human Services
      Patricia Simino Boyce, Ph.D., RN, is the University Dean for Health and Human Services (HHS) at CUNY, responsible for HHS undergraduate and graduate degree programs across CUNY’s 25 campuses, representing 40,000 students. Dr. Boyce provides strategic direction and collaborates with academic leadership and industry partners to mobilize resources, best practices, partnerships, and innovations to ensure distinction in CUNY’s academic programs and clinical experiences that drive career success for our students.
    Summary
    Integrating interprofessional education (IPE) into CSD curriculum can present a challenge for programs with limited access to other disciplines (Busch, et al. 2022). Simulated interprofessional learning is an effective training tool for CSD students (Weir-Mayta et al., 2020) and a practical method for connecting students across health professions programs and different campuses. We present our university-wide approach which has engaged three cohorts of SLP students in real-time virtual simulation of interprofessional cases with students from 6 other disciplines across 13 campuses. Outcomes include development of professional identity and establishment of entry-level competencies for interprofessional practice in health care.

    Learning Objectives
  • Explain why a university-wide approach can facilitate increased IPE opportunities for CSD students and faculty.
  • Identify barriers and discuss possible solutions for increasing opportunities for CSD students to engage in interprofessional learning experiences.
  • Discuss how the university-wide approach to providing IPE experiences results in establishment of entry-level competencies for interprofessional practice for CSD students.
  • Ethics Training in Graduate Students Follow-up: Where Do We Go from Here? (.05 CEUs)

    April 13 - Posters A (11:30 AM-12:00 PM)

    Location
    Center Foyer
    Speakers
    • Jennifer Gaylord, Ed.D, CScD, CCC-SLP (she/her/) - Assistant Professor
      Dr. J. Nikki Gaylord, CCC-SLP is an assistant professor at Murray State University in the Center for Communication Disorders and has been a practicing speech-language pathologist for over 20 years. She completed her doctorate of clinical science in speech-language pathology in 2019 and a doctorate of education in 2022. Her current research interests include exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction in athletes, exercise-induced dyspnea, and ethics in speech-language pathology.
    • Stephanie Schaaf, Ed.D, CCC-SLP (she/her/) - Program Director/ Assistant Professor
      Stephanie Schaaf, Ed.D, CCC-SLP, is program director and an assistant professor at Murray State University. In addition to supervising students, she enjoys teaching graduate courses relating to speech sound disorders, research, professional issues, and AAC. Before transitioning to the university, she worked in a variety of settings, including skilled nursing, home health, and public schools. Her current research and clinical pursuits include supervision, phonology, voice, AAC and leadership.
    Summary
    In graduate programs, it can be difficult to ensure ethics is taught in a way that is measurable and meets current standards. The purpose of this research investigation was to follow-up on a pilot study in which the efficacy of ethics training embEd.D.ed within a curriculum was compared to formal ethics training in first-year graduate students in speech-language pathology. The results indicated significant differences in knowledge after completion of the formal ethics training module for both participant groups. Results from replication of the pilot study provides additional evidence to promote best practices for ethics education in developing practitioners.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe how to use formal ethics education to ensure ethics is addressed in speech-language pathology or audiology programs to meet recommended standards.
  • Apply three different methods of instruction that are applicable to professional issues within communication disorders programs.
  • Implement methods for measurement of ethical skills in a graduate curriculum to meet recommended standards.
  • Increasing Student Engagement Through Intergenerational Research and Course Assignments (.05 CEUs)

    April 13 - Posters A (11:30 AM-12:00 PM)

    Location
    Center Foyer
    Speakers
    • Jean Neils-Strunjas, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Professor and Chair
      I am a professor and the department chair in Communication Sciences and Disorders in the Arnold School of Public Health at the University of South Carolina. My primary role is administration, but I also teach, conduct research, and serve the profession, university, and community. I focus on the speech-language pathologist’s scope of practice in prevention, counseling, assessment, and treatment of cognitive and cognitive-communication impairments in mild cognitive impairment and dementia.
    Summary
    Research conducted by the author and others suggests that undergraduate and graduate students are more engaged in courses that include experiential learning. Specifically, intergenerational course assignments and research increase students’ understanding of older adults, increase a sense of kinship toward older adults, and increase motivation to work with older clients as future healthcare professionals. Community-based settings for older adults and nursing homes provide optimal settings to promote positive attitudes toward older adults among healthcare students that may precede or supplement clinical placements. Implementation of three programs will be discussed: Bingocize®, Let’s Talk About Memory, and an Intergenerational Book Club.

    Learning Objectives
  • After attending this session, the participants will be able to complete a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Treats) analysis of intergenerational activities for undergraduate and graduate students.
  • After attending this session, participants will be able to summarize the literature on intergenerational research, teaching, and learning experiences in communication sciences and disorders.
  • After attending this session, the participants will create a novel, high-impact activity to strengthen their portfolios for promotion and or tenure that fits within their university resources and priorities.
  • Interprofessional Education for Graduate Students: Facilitating Coaching and Teaming in Early Intervention/Childhood (.05 CEUs)

    April 13 - Posters A (11:30 AM-12:00 PM)

    Location
    Center Foyer
    Speakers
    • Christine Myers, Ph.D., OTR/L - Program Director (Occupational Therapy)
      Christine Myers, Ph.D., OTR/L, FAOTA, FNAP is a clinical professor in the Department of Occupational Therapy where she serves as the director of the Doctor of Occupational Therapy program. She is also the director of INSPIRE, an interprofessional training grant funded by the US Department of Education (USDOE; #H325K180025), focusing on training occupational therapy, physical therapy, and speech-language pathology students to work interprofessionally in early intervention and school settings.
    • Claudia Senesac, PT, Ph.D., PCS - Clinical Professor
      Claudia Senesac, PT, Ph.D., PCS is a Clinical Professor at the University of Florida. She has over 40 years of pediatric clinical experience. Dr. Senesac serves as the overall project manager for an NIH multi-center funded grant investigating Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Biomarkers in boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy(DMD). Currently, she is Co-Director of the INSPIRE grant, an interprofessional training grant funded by the U.S. Department of Education.
    • Kristen Lewandowski, M.A., CCC-SLP - Director of Clinical Education
      Kristen Lewandowski, M.A., CCC-SLP is a Clinical Lecturer and Director of Clinical Education in the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences at the University of Florida.
    Summary
    There is a need for skilled therapy providers in early intervention and early childhood (EI/EC) programs across the United States (Catalino,et al., 2015). The Interdisciplinary Related Services Personnel Preparation for Early Childhood (INSPIRE) program trains occupational therapy (OT), physical therapy (PT), and speech-language pathology (SLP) scholars to collaborate on an interprofessional team via various learning opportunities. Teams of OT, PT, and SLP scholars engage in synchronous EI/EC seminars and experiential training, asynchronous coursework, EI/EC clinical placements, and service provision on their interprofessional team with a birth to three child. This poster presents an overview of the program and outcomes.

    Learning Objectives
  • Explain the need for qualified healthcare providers in interprofessional, early intervention/early childhood settings.
  • List various training methods for interprofessional education, including synchronous and asynchronous coursework, experiential learning in interprofessional assessment and intervention, and specialized clinical placements in early intervention/early childhood settings.
  • Describe methods for evaluating program outcomes for a multi-semester, hybrid training program addressing interprofessional education.
  • Role of Healthcare Humanities in the SLP Graduate Curriculum (.05 CEUs)

    April 13 - Posters A (11:30 AM-12:00 PM)

    Location
    Center Foyer
    Speakers
    • Heather Anderson, Ed.D., CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor of Clinical Communication Disorders
      Heather Anderson, Ed.D., CCC-SLP is Assistant Professor of Clinical Communication Disorders at LSU Health Shreveport. She earned a B.A. in English Education from Centenary College of Louisiana (1991), and M.A. in SLP (1994), and Ed.D. in educational leadership (2019) from Louisiana Tech University. Prior to joining the faculty, she practiced in schools, SNF, and hospital settings. Research interests include teaching and learning, supervision, and acquired communication and swallowing disorders.
    Summary
    Preparation for a career in communication disorders requires development of critical thinking and “soft skills” such as empathy and cultural competence (e.g., Dolev et al., 2021; Sylvan, 2019). Healthcare humanities has been identified as a tool for enhancing development of such skills in speech-language pathologists and other healthcare professions (e.g., Charon, 2001; Knudson-Vilaseca, 2022; Myers et al., 2020). This poster will session will explore the incorporation of assignments involving novels and films in two SLP graduate courses. Assignments and students’ self-reflections will be analyzed relative to CAA/CFCC standards and current literature in teaching and learning.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe benefits of incorporating humanities-oriented assignments in graduate students in speech-language pathology.
  • Identify appropriate materials and activities for participants' own courses.
  • Describe key characteristics and evidence base of healthcare humanities.
  • x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S5)

    April 13 - Posters A (11:30 AM-12:00 PM)

    Location
    No Room

    Using the New Simucase Dashboard to Facilitate Successful Pre-brief and Debrief Sessions (.1 CEUs)

    April 13 - Lunch (12:00-1:30 PM)

    Speakers
    • Clint Johnson, MA, CCC-SLP, CHSE - Vice President of Simucase Education
      Clint Johnson, MA, CCC-SLP, CHSE is a Certified Healthcare Simulation Educator. He is the Vice President of Simucase Education and trains faculty and students to use computer-based simulations successfully. Mr. Johnson has been an SLP for 25 years and has 13 years of experience in educational publishing and software development.
    • Erica Ligon, M.Ed., CCC-SLP - Lead Learning and Simulation Developer - Speech Pathology
      Erica Ligon currently serves as the Speech-Language Pathology Lead Learning and Simulation Developer at Simucase. Erica has practiced as a speech-language pathologist for over ten years and has experience diagnosing and treating a broad range of communication disorders across the lifespan. Throughout her career, Erica has worked in schools, medical facilities, and private practice. Erica completed her undergraduate and master’s degrees at The University of Georgia.
    • Katie Ondo, MA, CCC-SLP, CHSE - Editor in Chief
      Katie Ondo, MA, CCC-SLP, CHSE is a Certified Healthcare Simulation Educator and Editor in Chief for Simucase. She has developed computer-based simulations for 10+ years and has been providing tele-supervision services for 3 years. Katie also is employed by Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and specializes in acute care.
    Summary
    Presenters will demonstrate how to assign content, monitor performance, and use new dashboard analytics to lead effective pre-brief and debrief discussions. New tools for evaluating participation, performance, and overall satisfaction of clinical experiences for both supervisor and supervisee roles will be demonstrated. Outcome data and student feedback from FIRE Debrief Checklists will be presented.

    Learning Objectives
  • Explain the procedures for assigning, monitoring, and awarding observation hours and clinical clock hours via Simucase.
  • Describe the procedures and methodology for leading reflective pre-brief and debrief discussions.
  • Summarize outcome data from cohorts using FIRE Debrief Checklists.
  • x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S6)

    April 13 - Lunch (12:00-1:30 PM)

    Location
    No Room

    Addressing the Mental Health Needs of CSD Students (.15 CEUs)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions B (1:30-3:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Jessica Martin, Ph.D., (she/her/hers) - Online Counseling Program Coordinator
      Jessica L. Martin, Ph.D., CRC is a clinical assistant professor and coordinator of the online counseling program at William & Mary. Dr. Martin is a certified rehabilitation counselor and has a clinical background in disability and clinical mental health counseling. Her research, activism, and clinical work focuses on health disparities among marginalized populations, the impact of race/ethnicity in the counseling process, and counselor identity development, preparation, and training.
    Summary
    A growing number of college students have reported mental health issues. This session will provide participants with information about how to identify and appropriately respond to the mental health crises CSD graduate students may experience. Resources will be provided to mitigate these experiences.

    Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the signs of mental distress.
  • Create a plan for addressing mental health issues in students.
  • Develop strategies for implementing student support plans.
  • Audiology and Speech-language Pathology Interstate Compact (ASLP-IC) Update (.15 CEUs)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions B (1:30-3:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Lawrence F. Molt, Ph.D., CCC-A-SLP, FASHA, FAAA - Professor and Director, Neuroprocesses Research Laboratory
      Lawrence Molt is Professor and Director, Neuroprocesses Research Center at Auburn University. He is chair of the Audiology & Speech-Language Pathology Interstate Compact Commission (ASLP-ICC), ASHA Vice President for Finance, ASHA/IALP SLP representative to the World Health Organization (WHO) Rehabilitation Competency Framework Working Group, and current chair of the Alabama Licensure Board (ABESPA). He is a past president of the International Fluency Association and National Council of State Boards of Examiners.
    • Susan Adams, Esq., CAE, (she/her/hers) - Director, State Legislative & Regulatory Affairs
      Susan Adams is the Director for State Legislative and Regulatory Affairs at ASHA. She advances ASHA's public policy objectives as team lead and policy expert on state legislation and regulations affecting speech-language pathologists, audiologists and consumers. Susan received her bachelor’s degree from Towson University and her juris doctor from the University of Baltimore, School of Law. Susan holds the Certified Association Executive designation by the American Society of Association Executives.
    Summary
    The Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology Interstate Compact (ASLP-IC) became operational when it was passed by 10 states, which occurred in the Fall of 2021. The ASLP-IC Commission, which will operate the compact, met January 12-13, 2022. Commission members were told by representatives from the Council of State Governments that the typical time for setting up an interstate compact is about 18-24 months. Infrastructure establishment (e.g., database, funding streams, secretariat, and executive director selection, etc.) is underway. There are now 23 member states. An update on current status and when the commission anticipates issuing privileges to practice will be provided.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe the current status of the Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology Interstate Compact (ASLP-IC).
  • List the steps required of practitioners in utilizing the ASLP-IC for multistate/interstate practice.
  • Discuss the implications of the ASLP-IC compact on both academic and clinical education and professional clinical practice.
  • Fostering Cultural Competence in CSD: Outcomes from a 2-year Training Module (.15 CEUs)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions B (1:30-3:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Chenell Loudermill, Ph.D., CCC-SLP (she/her) - Clinical Professor/Director of Clinical Education in SLP
      Chenell Loudermill is a Clinical Professor and Director of Clinical Education in Speech-Language Pathology in the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences at Purdue University. She oversees and provides clinical education in speech-language pathology and serves as the SLHS Chair for DEI. Chenell has expertise in assessment/treatment of literacy disorders and treating individuals with social skills deficits. Other interests include leadership, culturally responsive practices and pedagogy, and administration/supervision.
    • Jaime Bauer Malandraki, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, (she/her) - Clinical Associate Professor
      Jaime Bauer Malandraki, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences at Purdue University where she teaches the graduate-level course on Counseling. She has expertise in designing innovative instruction, holistic models of clinical education and supervision, and fostering resilience for student and professional wellness.
    Summary
    Abstract: Standards regarding the need to address cultural competence (CC) in Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) have been required since 1994. Despite this mandate, academic programs have long struggled with how to systematically target the development of CC in student training. This session will dissect standards related to CC and current guidance regarding program expectations to meet these standards. This session will also highlight an innovative, outcome-driven, cohort-based curricular approach developed to train culturally competent clinicians. Outcome data from the first successful implementation of this 2-year program will be shared, along with strategies for implementing this approach at other programs.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe current CAA standards related to cultural competence.
  • Summarize the current state of cultural competence training in Communication Sciences and Disorders and compare approaches for addressing cultural competence.
  • Describe content, activities and a systematic approach used to develop culturally responsive clinicians.
  • Holistic Approaches to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in CSD Programs (.15 CEUs)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions B (1:30-3:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Jean-Franco Rivera Perez, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor
      Jean-Franco Rivera-Pérez, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Texas Christian University. His academic interest and areas of expertise include the use of technology to promote vocabulary in bilingual (Spanish/English) preschool children with and without language disorder. Other areas of expertise include bilingual development, biliteracy, vocabulary intervention/instruction, assessment and treatment of bilingual (Spanish/English) preschool children, and social justice.
    • Nidhi Mahendra, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Professor and Chair, Communicative Disorders & Sciences
      Nidhi Mahendra, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is Professor and Chair of the department of Communicative Disorders and Sciences and a Fellow of the American Speech Language Hearing Association. An active teacher-scholar, leader, and multilingual SLP, her areas of expertise are in JEDI (Justice, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion), adult neurogenic language disorders, healthy aging, and the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL).
    • Teresa Girolamo, Ph.D - Postdoctoral Trainee
      Teresa Girolamo, Ph.D., is a T32 Postdoctoral Training Fellow in the Cognitive Neuroscience of Communication at the University of Connecticut (CNC-CT). Her research addresses: 1) how underlying mechanisms influence real-time processing in autistic youth with language impairment; 2) how systemic factors (e.g., social determinants of health) plus individual differences (e.g., language ability) influence outcomes in autistic youth. To pursue this work, Teresa uses community-based methods and works with BIPOC communities.
    Summary
    Though CSD programs increasingly support diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI), most dialogue focuses on admissions or singular metrics (e.g., Praxis pass rates). To advance DEI and work further toward achieving justice, approaches must be more holistic. This session will address diversity, equity, and inclusion in CSD programs multiple areas, teaching, research, and mentorship. Importantly, these areas overlay with broader issues in professional development and ensuring a diverse workforce that is representative of the population. In addition, we offer lessons learned from the CAPCSD DEI Committee pertaining to this holistic approach.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe three actions in teaching, research, and mentorship to advance DEI in CSD programs.
  • Explain how to connect teaching, research, and mentorship in a holistic DEI approach within CSD programs.
  • Attendees will be able to list three lessons learned of the CAPCSD DEI Committee pertaining to holistic approaches to DEI.
  • Learning Through Change: Re-thinking the Student Experience Using Generational Data (.15 CEUs)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions B (1:30-3:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Joanna Scoggins, MEd, CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Clinical Instructor, Assistant Director of External Practicum
      Joanna Scoggins, MEd, CCC-SLP, is the Assistant Director of External Clinical Practicum at the University of South Carolina. She worked for 10 years as a school-based SLP and AAC specialist and 3 years in the disabilities sector in Ireland. Joanna joined the staff at the University of South Carolina as a research project coordinator before joining clinical faculty in 2018 as a practicum administrator.
    • Juliana O. Miller, MS, CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Clinical Instructor, Director of External Practicum
      Juliana O. Miller, MS, CCC-SLP is a Clinical Instructor and Director of External Clinical Practicum in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of South Carolina. She is the Professional Development Manager and Coordinating Committee Member of ASHA’s SIG 10 (Higher Education). A clinician with over 25 years of experience, she’s served children and adults with communication and swallowing disorders in educational and medical settings.
    Summary
    Abstract: As generations change, younger generations train and enter the workforce under previous generations. Research from as far back as “The Greatest Generation” and the “Baby Boomers” display the friction that accompanies these transitions. As Generation X and Y faculty and administrators seeking to help train Generation Z students, we know first-hand where differing priorities and motivations are challenging previous teaching and learning models. We will share strategies that we have employed in didactic, administrative, and experiential learning contexts to help improve student understanding and performance based on current generational research.

    Learning Objectives
  • Identify work-related differences between Generations X, Y, and Z.
  • Discuss in small groups, how participants have experienced the priority and motivation differences of different generations impacting our teacher and administrator/student relationships.
  • Describe 3 strategies based in generational research to help mitigate the effects of generational differences on didactic teaching, experiential learning, and administrative information sharing.
  • PRAXIS Results and Information for Educators (.15 CEUs)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions B (1:30-3:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Nick Bellack, M.A. - Client Relations Director
      Nicholas A. Bellack, Client Relations Director, Professional Licensure and Certification, Educational Testing Service (ETS), is responsible for providing support for professional licensure and certification stakeholders around the country. Before joining ETS, Bellack held the assistant and director position for the Wyoming Professional Teaching Standards Board, was an early learning consultant for the State of Wyoming, and was an elementary school teacher. He holds a bachelor's and master's degree in education.
    Summary
    Learn how to extract data from ETS Data Manager to make instructional decisions in addition to finding out essential preparation materials available for testing candidates.

    Learning Objectives
  • Learn about ETS Data Manager, what reports are able to be run, and how to access data.
  • Learn about resources available to programs and test takers.
  • Preparing a Diverse Undergraduate Population for Success in CSD Graduate Programs (.15 CEUs)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions B (1:30-3:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Anthony DiLollo, Ph.D., (he/him/his) - Director of the Davies School of Communication Sciences and Disorders
      Anthony DiLollo, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is a Professor and Director of the Davies School of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Texas Christian University. He has taught counseling in CSD programs for over 20 years, and consulted with numerous programs about implementing counseling across their curriculum. Dr. DiLollo has published and presented in the areas of counseling, fluency disorders, critical thinking, and qualitative research in communication sciences and disorders.
    • Jennifer Jones Lister, Ph.D., CCC-A - Professor and Associate Dean
      Jennifer Jones Lister is a Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders and Associate Dean of the College of Behavioral and Community Sciences at the University of South Florida. She was a member of ASHA's Academic Affairs Board that prepared this report.
    • Jennifer M. Simpson, Au.D., CCC-A - Clinical Professor and Associate Head
      Jennifer M. Simpson is a Clinical Professor and Associate Head in the Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences Department at Purdue University. She currently serves as President Elect of CAPCSD. Her clinical interests include clinical education, pediatric diagnostic audiology and intervention, leadership, and administration.
    Summary
    Models of undergraduate education in CSD have been debated for decades and vary widely. Currently, 275 institutions offer an undergraduate degree in CSD with a total enrollment of over 36,000. However, only 57% of AuD programs require applicants to have completed coursework in CSD while 83% of SLP Master’s programs have this requirement. Across CSD graduate programs, applications far exceed capacity. Aspects of current models of undergraduate education that may influence success in graduate school will be discussed. Data from the ASHA CSD Education Survey and the ASHA Academic Affairs Board will be presented.

    Learning Objectives
  • State the basic requirements needed for graduate education.
  • Describe the relationship between undergraduate preparation and academic success in graduate school.
  • Discuss the potential for uniformity in undergraduate preparation.
  • Report: ASHA’s Ad Hoc Committee on Next Steps to Re-design Entry-level Education for SLPs (.15 CEUs)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions B (1:30-3:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Ann Tyler, Ph.D., CCC-SLP (she/her) - Associate Dean and Professor Emerita, College of Health and Human Services
      Ann A. Tyler, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is Associate Dean and Professor Emerita in the Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences at Western Michigan University. She chaired ASHA’s Ad Hoc Committee on Next Steps to Re-Design Entry-level Education for Speech-Language Pathologists and previously served on the Ad Hoc Committee on Graduate Education in Speech-Language Pathology, as well as the Academic Affairs Board (Chair, 2019).
    • Lemmietta McNeilly, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, FASAE, CAE (she/her) - Chief Staff Officer, Speech-Language Pathology
      Lemmietta McNeilly, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, FASAE, CAE, ASHA Fellow, serves as ASHA’s Chief Staff Officer for Speech-Language Pathology, responsible for SLP Practices, Government Affairs and Public Policy, Special Interest Groups, International Programs and the Enhanced Service Delivery Strategic Objective, including practicing at the Top of the License. She has international publiications and presentations regarding the topics of innovative models of education, competency based education, working with SLPAs and functional rehabilitation outcomes.
    • Loretta Nunez, MA, AuD, CCC-A/SLP (she/her) - Senior Director, Academic Affairs and Research Education
      Loretta Nunez, M.A., Au.D., CCC-A/SLP, ASHA Fellow, FNAP, is ASHA’s Senior Director of Academic Affairs & Research Education. She directs activities supporting academic, clinical and research education encompassing educational initiatives, personnel preparation, and higher education trends and forecasting. She leads ASHA's strategic objective to advance interprofessional education and collaborative practice. Loretta has worked in both academic and clinical settings prior to joining ASHA.
    • Margaret Rogers, Ph.D., CCC-SLP (she/her) - Chief Staff Officer for Science & Research
      Margaret Rogers, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, ASHA Fellow, is the Chief Staff Officer for Science and Research at ASHA. She liaises with the staff who oversee ASHA’s Academic Affairs and Research Education, Journals Program, Leader, Practice Portal and Evidence Maps, National Center for Evidence-Based Practice, and Survey and Analysis. She is also the owner of ASHA's Strategic Objective on Enhancing the Generation, Publication, and Knowledge Translation of Clinical Research into Evidence-Based Practices.
    Summary
    ASHA’s Ad Hoc Committee on Next Steps to Re-Design Entry-level Education for Speech-Language Pathologists submits a report to the Board of Directors. A series of 14 webinars were conducted in 2022, each with an associated survey and 60 breakout group discussions that were recorded and analyzed qualitatively. The findings are compelling. The six focus areas of the Next Steps AHC were: the future of learning, work, and teaching; alternative models of education; faculty sufficiency and development; competency-based education; student diversity; and clinical experiential learning. The survey and discussion data regarding aspects of the current educational model will be shared.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe recommendations regarding educational opportunities identified by ASHA members in preparing speech-language pathologists to enter clinical practice within the current 2-year master’s degree model.
  • Discuss perceptions about what is needed now, and in the near future, to adequately prepare speech-language pathologists (SLP) to enter practice.
  • Summarize data and concerns that led to the recommendations on the following topics: Alternative Education Models, Competency-Based Education, Clinical Experiential Learning, Student Diversity, Faculty Development, Future of Learning, Work, & Teaching.
  • Six Years of Clinical Skills Self-reflection Journaling: Lessons Learned and Data Derived (.15 CEUs)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions B (1:30-3:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Elaine Martindale, M.S., CCC-SLP - Clinical Coordinator
      Elaine Martindale, MS, CCC-SLP, is the Clinical Coordinator for the Speech-Language Pathology program at the University of Central Oklahoma (UCO). After receiving her M.S. from UCO in 2001, she worked in public schools. She returned to UCO in 2010 as an instructor and supervisor before transitioning into the role of clinical coordinator in 2014. Along with coordinating, Elaine relishes the opportunity to supervise graduate students in the clinic on campus.
    • Linda R. Sealey, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Program Director / Professor
      Linda R. Sealey, Ph.D.., CCC-SLP, is a tenured professor at the University of Central Oklahoma and has served as the Program Director and Program Coordinator for eight years, teaching in higher education for over 14 years. Her research interests include the SOTL, as well as voice treatment in people with Parkinson’s disease. She enjoys educating and strives to spark curiosity and the love of life-long learning among her students.
    Summary
    As accredited programs strive to incorporate the CAA Professional Practice Competencies under Standard 3.1.1B, for both Accountability and Clinical Reasoning using self-reflection, this presentation will illuminate the 6-year journey of a graduate program implementing a series of self-reflection journal activities. The lessons learned in developing and administering the activity, artifact, and rubric will help attendees navigate or inform their journey into the practical application of this type of learning tool. Data, both qualitative and quantitative, along with supervisor and student feedback, will be shared along with how those analyses contributed to and drove refinement of the process and product.

    Learning Objectives
  • Demonstrate a practical understanding of the basis of reflective practice, learning, and assessment.
  • Explain the reasons for selecting a given model of reflection after a brief review of models of reflective learning.
  • Describe the development of self-reflection journal activities as a component of addressing the CAA standards in a graduate SLP program.
  • x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S7)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions B (1:30-3:00 PM)

    Location
    No Room

    Effective Use of CSD Graduate Student Exit Interview Data (.15 CEUs)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions C (3:30-5:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Angela Barber, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, (she/her) - Professor and Chair
      Dr. Angela Barber serves as Professor and Chair of the Samford University Communication Sciences and Disorders Department. Barber’s research focuses on early autism and social communication. Her primary research line centers on improving accessibility to effective early identification and interventions for autistic children by building cooperative and sustainable solutions that promote health equity. Barber also studies pedagogoical approaches to preparing SLP students to work with minimally verbal children.
    • Jacqueline Towson, Ph.D. CCC-SLP, (she/her) - Associate Professor, Graduate Program Director, Interim Associate School Director
      Jacqueline Towson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is an Associate Professor, Interim Associate School Director and Graduate Program Director in the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders at University of Central Florida. She completed her doctorate in the Education of Students with Exceptionalities following 14 years of work in public schools. Her research broadly concerns building the capacity of individuals who work with young children experiencing language impairments and those considered at-risk.
    Summary
    Programs are required to interview CSD graduate students at the end of their program. This panel discussion will discuss the variability of questions asked of these students about their graduate program experience. Examples of how interview data was used to improve CSD education will also be shared.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe the requirements for exit interviews for CSD programs.
  • Describe the process of creating effective exit interview questions.
  • Apply practices for utilizing the data gleaned from the interviews.
  • Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice: Considering Today’s Trends to Inform Tomorrow’s Practice (.15 CEUs)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions C (3:30-5:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Jennifer B. Watson, PhD, CCC-SLP (she/her/hers) - Professor
      Jennifer B. Watson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, ASHA-F, BCS-F, FNAP, is Professor and IPE Coordinator at TCU's Davies School of CSD. During her 40 year career, Dr. Watson has served as departmental chair, undergraduate/graduate program director, and clinic director. She also has served as CAPCSD IPE/IPP Committee Chair, IPEC Core Competency Revision working Group member, and as a board member for the National Academies of Practice and ASHA (VP for Standards/Ethics).
    Summary
    For decades, interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional collaborative practice (IPCP) have been considered valuable in supporting positive healthcare and educational outcomes. The interest in and intentional efforts to enhance IPE/IPCP in the field of communication disorders and other disciplines exploded in the early 2000’s. This presentation reviews current IPE/IPCP trends related to competencies, administration, educational content and strategies, and assessment and outcomes. Student and faculty issues impacting outcomes are discussed, along with trending frameworks used to develop and implement IPE/IPCP. Participants are guided in exploring how current developments relate to and may inform improvements in their own IPE/IPCP programs.

    Learning Objectives:
  • Describe recent trends in the development, implementation, and outcomes of IPE/IPCP.
  • Explain how current practices may inform future education, practice, and research.
  • Identify how current trends may support the development, implementation, and sustainability of their own IP programs.
  • Problem-solving and Information Exchange (PSIE) for Chairs: Fundraising in Academia (.15 CEUs)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions C (3:30-5:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Anne Marie Tharpe, Ph.D. CCC-A - Professor & Chair
      Dr. Anne Marie Tharpe is Professor and Chair, Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center and School of Medicine. She became department chair in 2009. Her current role as chair includes oversight of a large clinical operation that provides >85,000 patient visits per year, a graduate program that confers four degrees, and a research program that expends approximately $8 million annually.
    • Lynette Austin, Ph.D., CCC/SLP, (she/her/hers) - professor and chair, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders
      Lynette Austin, Ph.D., CCC/SLP, professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Abilene Christian University, has been chair of the department since 2016. As chair, she has focused on graduate program expansion, curricular development, and Interprofessional Education (IPE) programming for both undergraduate and graduate CSD students. Her primary areas of teaching and research have to do with assessment and intervention for bilingual/multilingual individuals, and service delivery to CLD populations.
    Summary
    Patients and their families come to our clinics to receive hope and compassionate care. Graduates of our academic programs are grateful for the excellent education that launched their careers. And, our communities expect our researchers to pursue ideas that can lead to life-changing discoveries. Philanthropy is essential to maintaining our academic missions. This session will address how we can tap into the gratitude of our stakeholders by providing them opportunities to give back to our successful enterprises. We will review different types and purposes of fundraising in academic settings, and the audience will share their successes and challenges in fundraising.

    Learning Objectives
  • Participants will be able to describe different types of fundraising projects and purposes.
  • Participants will be able to outline the steps/stages involved in developing a fundraising plan.
  • participants will be able to list 3 effective forms of stewarding their donors.
  • Problem-solving and Information Exchange (PSIE) for Clinic Directors (.15 CEUs)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions C (3:30-5:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Alyssa R. Needleman, Ph.D. - Clinical Director and Professor
      Alyssa Needleman, Ph.D., is the Clinical Director and Professor in the Department of Audiology at Nova Southeastern University. Her responsibilities include management of clinical operations, doctoral teaching, and coordination of internship and externship experiences. Dr. Needleman has served in a variety of roles in academia, hospital administration and industry. Her current research focuses on student-clinician assessment criteria, preceptor roles and preparation, and characteristics of audiology student applicants for graduate success.
    • Sondra Reynolds, CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Director of Clinical Services
      Sondra Reynolds, M.S., CCC-SLP Director of Clinical Services, Undergraduate and Graduate Advisor, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point is a clinical associate supervisor who currently oversees all clinical placements for undergraduate and graduate students in speech pathology. She worked as an SLP in the schools as well as a Director of Special Education and Elementary Principal. She served as President of the Wisconsin Speech Language and Hearing Association.
    Summary
    This facilitated session provides an opportunity for Clinic Directors to discuss various topics (e.g., the fostering of consistent grading practices by on- and off-campus clinical educators; how to create clinic grading rubrics to facilitate this). Questions will be addressed with an opportunity for group problem-solving and information sharing to facilitate innovative approaches.

    Learning Objectives
  • Develop effective clinic grading rubrics.
  • Create and disseminate consistent grading practices for on- and off-campus clinical educators.
  • Identify current issues and generate solutions for problem areas in clinic grading.
  • Problem-solving and Information Exchange (PSIE) for UG Programs (.15 CEUs)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions C (3:30-5:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Brian M. Kreisman, Ph.D., CCC-A, FAAA - Department Chair and Professor
      Dr. Brian Kreisman is Department Chair and Professor in the Speech Pathology and Audiology Department at Calvin University. After earning his Ph.D. from the University of Florida, he helped start the MS in Audiology program at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand and then taught at Towson University. In 2017, Dr. Kreisman founded Global Village Partners to improve hearing health care and other allied health care in developing countries.
    • Juliet Weinhold, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Clinical Professor, Director: BS in Speech and Hearing Science
      Juliet Weinhold, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is a clinical professor in the College of Health Solutions at Arizona State University. She is director of the BS degree program in Speech and Hearing Science and also directs the Post-baccalaureate Certificate in Communication Science and Disorders at ASU. Her research interests include projects in developmental acoustic analysis of late-acquired speech sound disorders, and the effect of orofacial myofunctional disorders (OMD) on speech and swallowing.
    Summary
    This facilitated session provides an opportunity for undergraduate program coordinators to discuss various topics (e.g., fostering relationships with graduate programs, providing pathways to alternate career options aside from CSD graduate programs for students, and completing the university goal setting/evaluation processes). Questions will be addressed with an opportunity for group problem solving and information sharing to facilitate innovative approaches.

    Learning Objectives
  • Identify ways to foster relationships with graduate programs to facilitate the application process for students.
  • Discuss potential pathways for alternate career options to CSD graduate programs.
  • Develop strategies for completion of the university goal-setting/evaluation processes.
  • Reimagining the Speech-language Pathology Curriculum (.15 CEUs)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions C (3:30-5:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Justine Hamilton, MClSc, MBA, (she/her/hers) - Assistant Professor and Director of Clinical Education
      Justine Hamilton, MClSc, MBA, is Assistant Professor and Director of Clinical Education at the McMaster University School of Rehabilitation Science Speech-Language Pathology Program. She helped develop and launch North America's first problem-based learning program in SLP. Prior to joining McMaster in 2017, Prof. Hamilton co-owned a private practice with 3 clinics across southern Ontario.
    • Lyn S. Turkstra, Ph.D., (she/her/hers) - Professor and Assistant Dean
      Dr. Lyn S. Turkstra is a Professor and the founding Assistant Dean for Speech-Language Pathology in the School of Rehabilitation Science at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada. Her research focuses on understanding effects of acquired brain injury on cognition and communication, and she is co-author of a new text, Transforming Cognitive Rehabilitation, with Dr. McKay Sohlberg and Justine Hamilton.
    • Rebecca Bawayan, Ph.D. CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Assistant Professor
      Rebecca Bawayan, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is Assistant Professor in the School of Rehabilitation Sciences at Moravian University. Her interests include childhood language and literacy assessment and intervention, autism spectrum disorder, professional development, issues related to school-based practice, and the scholarship of teaching and learning.
    Summary
    Abstract: Problem Based Learning (PBL) was developed in the early 1900s as a constructivist, learner-centered andragogy. In this presentation, we describe the two accredited graduate SLP PBL programs in North America: McMaster University and Moravian University. We share program principles and how they foster engagement, and how students learn content using healthcare problems, working collaboratively to analyze, research, and critically assess products of their learning. We provide quantitative and qualitative outcome data related to students' academic and clinical skills, focusing on how we promote interprofessional collaboration, emphasize inclusion and cultural awareness, and infuse evidence-informed practice throughout the curriculum.

    Learning Objectives
  • Compare and contrast traditional and PBL approaches in regard to student engagement and development of critical thinking skills.
  • Identify benefits and challenges of developing and implementing a PBL curriculum.
  • Reflect on their own instructional methods and evaluate the potential of a PBL approach for promoting inclusion, IPE/IPP, and students’ skills in research, advocacy, and self-sufficiency.
  • SoTL in CSD: Design, Data, and Dissemination (.15 CEUs)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions C (3:30-5:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Colleen F. Visconti, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Professor & Program Director
      Colleen F. Visconti is Professor and Program Director of Speech-Language Pathology at Baldwin Wallace University. She is the Editor and co-founder of Teaching and Learning in Communication Sciences & Disorders; co-author of Evidence-Based Education in the Classroom: Examples from Clinical Disciplines; and Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology: Evidence-Based Education. Her research focuses on service-oriented study abroad, peer review and peer mentoring, and evidence-based educational practices.
    • Joann P. Benigno, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor and Division Director
      Joann P. Benigno, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is an Associate Professor and the Director of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Ohio Unversity. Primary research interests include examining the links between social cognition, language, and cognitive abilities in children with and without communication disorders. Teaching interests include child language development and disorders. Scholarship of teaching and learning foci involve training students to work with autistic children and their families through community outreach programming.
    • Kerry C. Mandulak, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Associate Professor
      Kerry Callahan Mandulak, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is associate professor and chair of the graduate admissions committee in the School of Communication Sciences & Disorders at Pacific University. Her research program focuses on investigating the feasibility and methods of implementing holistic review for graduate admissions. She presents nationally within the discipline and adjacent disciplines in order to pursue her goal of continuing the national conversation around this important work.
    • Mark DeRuiter, MBA, Ph.D., (he/him/his) - Professor
      Mark DeRuiter MBA, Ph.D., is Professor and Vice Chair for Academic Affairs in the department of Communication Science and Disorders at the University of Pittsburgh. He has held varied higher education CSD roles including clinic director, graduate program director, and associate department head. Mark serves on the CAPCSD Board, ASHA's Health Care Economics Committee, as well as the Founding Editorial Board of Teaching and Learning in Communication Sciences and Disorders.
    Summary
    Abstract: Join us for a session that moves you forward with both applying and conducting SoTL research in the classroom. Presenters will guide you through existing examples of design and data collection and get you thinking about applying and extending this knowledge in your own teaching and research. Opportunities to consider dissemination of your current and future work are also addressed. Participants will have the opportunity to network in small groups to meet their individual needs regarding design, data collection and analysis, and dissemination.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe key elements of design in SoTL research.
  • Identify strategies for data collection and management in SoTL research.
  • list three ways to disseminate SoTL research.
  • x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S8)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions C (3:30-5:00 PM)

    Location
    No Room

    Mapping Your Career in Academia (.15 CEUs)

    April 13 - Concurrent Sessions C (3:30-5:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Jeff Buller, Ph.D. - Senior Partner
      Jeffrey L. Buller is a senior partner in ATLAS: Academic Training, Leadership, and Assessment Services. He is the author of over twenty-five books on academic leadership, a textbook for first year college students, several novels, and a book on the music dramas of Richard Wagner. Dr. Buller has also written numerous articles and monographs on Greek and Latin literature, opera, and college administration.
    Summary
    When many of us begin our academic careers, we think we know how the course of that career will develop. But unexpected occurrences, opportunities, and challenges often intervene, and few of us end up following the precise paths we once created for ourselves. In this workshop, we'll explore how best to map your career in academia regardless of where your are in your current development. We'll look at specific advice for newer faculty members, mid career faculty members, and senior faculty members, including issues to consider about whether a shift in focus is right for you.

    Learning Objectives
  • Recognize why career-mapping is different for newer faculty members, mid-career faculty members, and senior faculty members.
  • Formulate and follow a specific map that will increase the likelihood that they will be able to attain their career goals.
  • Decide whether a variation in career path, such as a shift for teaching/research to administration, is right for them.
  • Honors and Awards Reception

    April 13 - Honors & Awards Reception 5:15-6:15 PM

    x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S9)

    April 13 - Honors & Awards Reception 5:15-6:15 PM

    Location
    No Room

    Examining DEI Through the Lens of BIPOC Students (.15 CEUs)

    April 14 - Plenary 2 (7:50-9:30 AM)

    Location
    Salon IV-IX
    Speakers
    • Karen C. Davis, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Karen Davis, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is an associate professor at Middle Tennessee State University who has worked for over 15 years as a school speech-language pathologist. Her research interests are centered within the domain of language and literacy for struggling learners. Dr. Davis’s research interests include language and literacy disorder in culturally and linguistically diverse populations, reading comprehension intervention, interprofessional education/practice (IPE/IPP), and cultural responsiveness in CSD education
    • Kimmerly Harrell, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, BCS-CL - Assistant Professor
      Kimmerly Harrell, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, BCS-CL, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders in the Brooks Rehabilitation College of Healthcare Sciences at Jacksonville University in Jacksonville, FL. She is a Board-Certified Specialist in Child Language and has over 20 years of experience working with individuals who have disabilities.
    Summary
    This session will look at the effects of microaggressions and microinterventions through the lens of BIPOC students in the field of communication sciences and disorders. Data will be presented from a phenomenological study that included individual interviews. Participants will engage in interactive activities that will increase their knowledge of techniques that can be used to dismantle microaggressions.

    Learning Objectives
  • Define microaggressions and understand their impact on BIPOC students.
  • Define microinterventions for the purpose of dismantling micraggressive acts.
  • Use the feedback gleaned from students to create more inclusive learning environments.
  • x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S10)

    April 14 - Plenary 2 (7:50-9:30 AM)

    Location
    No Room

    Language Sample Analysis Knowledge and Training in Graduate Students (.1 CEUs)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions D (10:00-11:30 AM)

    Speakers
    • Allegra Cornaglia, Ph.D.., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Assistant Professor
    • Jayne Brandel, Ph.D.., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor/Chairperson
      Jayne Brandel is an Associate Professor and Chair of the CSD Division at West Virginia University. As an ASHA-certified speech-language pathologist, her research interests are focused on increasing the use of research-based activities in the evaluation and treatment of language-based disorders in schools. Additionally, she has begun to explore effective clinical instructional practices at the university level as well as regarding professional development activities.
    Summary
    Language sample analysis (LSA), part of a comprehensive evaluation of developmental language disorders, requires specific foundational morphological and syntactic knowledge. Previous studies have shown a knowledge gap for both SLPs and graduate students. This survey of 37 graduate programs (239 individuals) examined performance on Mean Length of Utterance analysis and Clausal Density and possible factors associated with performance outcomes. The majority of students (88.3%) failed to show mastery of MLU skills and none showed mastery of CD skills. Previous coursework and general LSA experience had no effect on scores. Implications include the examination of current graduate education.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe the importance of language sample analysis in the detection and treatment of developmental language disorders.
  • List the foundational morphologic and syntactic skills needed to complete language sample analysis.
  • Identify areas of language curriculum to be targeted for improvement.
  • ASHA Certification Update (.1 CEUs)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions D (10:00-11:30 AM)

    Speakers
    • Debra Suiter, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, BCS-S, (she/her/hers) - Director, Voice & Swallow Clinic; Professor
      Debra M. Suiter, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, BCS-S, F-ASHA, is Director of the Voice and Swallow Clinic and Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Kentucky. She is the current Chair of the ASHA Council for Clinical Certification in Audiology and Speech Pathology (CFCC). She is a Board Certified Specialist in Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders and a Fellow of ASHA.
    • Erica J. Williams, Ph.D. - Clinical Professor
      Erica Williams, Ph.D., CCC-A, is a Clinical Professor in the College of Health Solutions at Arizona State University. She is currently the Program Director and Clinical Placement Coordinator for the Doctor of Audiology Program. Dr. Williams teaches academic coursework in auditory/vestibular pathologies and diagnostics and is a clinical instructor in the on-campus clinic. She also participates in an annual humanitarian trip to Guaymas, Mexico.
    • Todd R. Philbrick, CAE, ICE-CCP, (he/him/his) - Chief Certification Officer
      Todd Philbrick, CAE, ICE-CCP is ASHA's Chief Certification Officer and Ex Officio to the CFCC.
    Summary
    Attend this session to receive the latest information on ASHA's certification programs including recent updates to the CCC-SLP standards and the new assistant certification program.

    Learning Objectives
  • Understand the updates to the SLP standards which impact graduate students who begin their graduate programs starting 1/1/2023.
  • Understand the updates to the Audiology standards which went into effect in 2022 to replace the COVID accommodations.
  • Learn the latest updates on ASHA's assistant certification program, which may be a good fit for undergraduate students who don't immediately pursue a graduate degree or graduate students who work during their program.
  • Creating Stability in Clinical Placements and Clinician Preparation (.1 CEUs)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions D (10:00-11:30 AM)

    Speakers
    • Tina Veale, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Professor and Administrative Director, Speech-Language Pathology
      Dr. Tina Veale is Professor and Administrative Director of SLP programs at Lewis University. She teaches neuroscience, including human brain dissection; and a variety of child language courses. She has authored materials to enhance teaching in each of these domains. Current research involves the study of language sampling methodologies, and how to improve written narration in adolescents with autism. Dr. Veale is a Fellow of the Illinois Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
    Summary
    'As clinical practicum placements in educational and medical settings become more difficult to secure and more likely to collapse due to a variety of workforce and workplace tensions, new models of training student SLPs are emerging. At Lewis University, we developed a clinical model that: 1) Meets communication needs of underserved populations in our community; 2) Assists local agencies in providing SLP services; 3) Provides insight into unique professional opportunities for future SLPs; and 4) Inspires student SLPs to close service gaps in healthcare and educational systems so that ALL people can communicate effectively. Come see how we do it!'

    Learning Objectives
  • Name three new clinical practicum settings that will reduce healthcare or educational inequities.
  • Describe how to improve clinical skill development for each individual SLP student outside the university clinic.
  • Argue the educational and financial benefits of developing faculty-led clinics to prepare future SLPs.
  • Documentation for the Struggling Student (.15 CEUs)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions D (10:00-11:30 AM)

    Speakers
    • Cara Boester, M.A.CCC-SLP - Director of Clinical Education Speech Language Pathology
      Cara Boester MA, CCC-SLP, is the Director of Clinical Experiences for Speech-Language Pathology in the CSD Department at Illinois State University. In addition to her administrative duties scheduling on-campus and externship placements, she provides speech, language, and aural rehab services to deaf/ hard of hearing clients across the age span.
    • Leanna Lawrence, MHS, CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Associate Clinical Professor/Clinic Director
      Leanna Lawrence, MHS, CCC-SLP, is an Associate Clinical Professor in the Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences at the University of Missouri. She currently serves as the director of their on-site clinic and also supports graduate students in securing their off-campus placements. Additionally, Professor Lawrence teaches several clinic-based courses for the department.
    Summary
    Students who are having difficulty completing a graduate program can require substantial support from faculty to move toward clinical and academic success. This presentation will discuss the importance of gathering relevant and detailed information regarding the extent of that support along the way. In addition to creating measurable support plans, both the timing and type of documentation required should dismissal procedures need to be enacted will be discussed.

    Learning Objectives
  • State when documentation is needed for student support plans.
  • Practice creating the type of documentation that should be included in a student support plan that will be reasonable to enact for both faculty and students.
  • Identify when it is an appropriate time for a student to be counseled out or dismissed from a program.
  • Flipping the Script: Engaging CSD Students Using a Flipped Classroom Model (.15 CEUs)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions D (10:00-11:30 AM)

    Speakers
    • Eric J. Sanders, Ph.D., (he/him/his) - Program Director, Associate Professor
      Eric J. Sanders, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is an associate professor and Program Director of the Speech-Language Pathology program in the School of Rehabilitation Sciences at Moravian University. Dr. Sanders’ research focuses on service provision and language and literacy development for individuals who require AAC, and those with intellectual disabilities. Additionally, he studies the scholarship of teaching and learning with a focus on graduate education in speech-language pathology.
    Summary
    The Flipped Classroom Model (FCM) has received recent attention as an innovative approach for teaching students across the health sciences, including CSD. In the FCM, the classroom is “flipped” from the traditional approach in that the instructor provides information to for students to review outside of class and spends time in class working on activities to bolster understanding of the content. This presentation will explore the advantages and disadvantages of a flipped classroom, best practices for flipped classrooms, and a review of strategies that have been successfully utilized in the literature and by the presenter.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe a flipped classroom.
  • Understand the advantages and disadvantages of a flipped classroom.
  • Discuss current strategies for using a flipped classroom.
  • Infusing the Principles of DEI into CSD Courses (.15 CEUs)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions D (10:00-11:30 AM)

    Speakers
    • Eusabia Mont, M.S., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Associate Clinical Professor
      Eusabia V. Mont is an Associate Clinical Professor at the University of Maryland, College Park. She is the Director of the Cultural-Linguistic Diversity Emphasis Program, Program Director, and Master's Program, and consults with the Office of Undergraduate Studies on DEIB in course design. Additionally, Eusebia teaches Multicultural Issues in Communication Disorders. Her specific clinical interests include communication across the lifespan and infusing diverse perspectives into course design.
    Summary
    While universities have committed to educating their students on DEI, the actual implementation of having the coursework genuinely reflect those principles likely remains a “work in progress.” This session will provide in-depth information and take-away ideas to ensure that universities are well-equipped to infuse this content into their courses. Small-group discussions will provide participants with an opportunity to outline next steps for their programs.

    Learning Objectives
  • State the rationale for infusing DEI into CSD curriculum.
  • Apply principles of DEI when outlining changes to or designing new coursework.
  • Identify methods to assess student learning for DEI topics.
  • Interprofessional Education in Audiology: Knowing Your Goals Identifies the Most Effective Approaches (.1 CEUs)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions D (10:00-11:30 AM)

    Speakers
    • Nancy McKenna, AuD, Ph.D. - Associate Professor, Clinical Audiologist
      Nancy McKenna AuD, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Speech and Hearing Sciences, UNC Chapel Hill, provides comprehensive diagnostic and rehabilitative audiology services at the UNC Hearing and Communication Center. As faculty in the audiology doctoral program, she teaches courses including Genetics of the Peripheral Auditory System, Hearing Disorders, Teaching and Supervision, Tinnitus and Pharmacology in Clinical Practice. She brings to her practice a diverse background including a research career in biomedical sciences.
    Summary
    Interprofessional Education (IPE) is an essential element in the preparation of future clinicians for team-based, person-centered healthcare. ASHA has identified four Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaboration: Values/Ethics; Roles/Responsibilities; Interprofessional Communication; and Teams and Teamwork (https://www.asha.org/). Forging relationships with other professions and designing experiences that benefit all involved can be challenging but can be facilitated by focusing on goals. The Audiology Program at UNC Chapel Hill has used multiple approaches to provide students with experiences that encompass these competencies. We will discuss how some approaches have been more successful than others based on student outcomes.

    Learning Objectives
  • Evaluate how the diverse possibilities of IPE experiences discussed may be useful in their own programs.
  • Apply ASHA's IPEC Core Competencies to setting student goals for IPE and Interprofessional Collaborative Practice (IPCP) experiences.
  • Understand the challenges in developing IPE experiences with other professional programs.
  • Preparing for SLP Work in the Medical Setting: An Interdisciplinary Training Pedagogy (.1 CEUs)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions D (10:00-11:30 AM)

    Speakers
    • Ann Flint, Ed.D., RRT - Associate Professor
      Ann Flint, Ed.D., RRT is an Assistant Professor in and Program Director for the Respiratory Care Department at Grand Valley State University. Ann earned a BS in from the University of Michigan, and an MS and an Ed.D. from Ferris State University. Ann’s research interests include health care disparities, respiratory care advancement programs, ethics, mentoring students, and recruitment and retention of underrepresented first-generation college students.
    • Beth Macauley, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, FNAP - Associate Professor
      Dr. Beth Macauley is an Associate Professor in the Dept. of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids, MI. She received her BA, MA, & Ph.D. from the University of Florida with a major in Speech-Language Pathology/Neurogenic Communication Disorders and a minor in Neuropsychology. Her areas of specialty are aphasia and related disorders and Animal-Assisted Therapy incorporating horses and dogs.
    • Courtney Karasinski, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor and SLP Program Director
      Courtney Karasinski, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is the program director of the master of science in speech-language pathology and vice chair of the University Academic Senate at Grand Valley State University. Her research focuses on oral and written language development and disorders in school-aged children and adolesecnts, including speakers of multiple languages and dialects, and graduate education in speech-language pathology, especially models of clinical education and interprofessional education.
    • Denise A. Ludwig, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, FNAP, ACUE, - Professor
      Denise A. Ludwig is a Professor in the Department of CSD, College of Health Professions, at Grand Valley State University. Her research interests include interprofessional education and practice andragogy, She has over 35 years of experience working in collaborative interprofessional teams. She has extensive experience in clinical simulation and alternative clinical processes. Her background includes work within special education administration and healthcare settings.
    • Karen Duffy, M.A., CCC-SLP - Hospital-Based Speech-Language Pathologist
      Karen Duffy M.A. CCC-SLP is the clinical education coordinator for SLP students across the continuum at Corewell Health. She also practices at a trauma one hospital at Corewell Health working with adults. She is a member of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) and an adjunt faculty member at Calvin University.
    • Randalynn Hajek, MPH, RDN - Assistant Professor
      Randalynn Hajek, MPH, RDN is on the GVSU Clinical Dietetics Affiliate Faculty.
    • Roy Keider, MS CMD RT(T), (he/him/his) - Associate Professor
      R. Charles Keider, M.S., CMD, RT(T), Assistant Professor Clinical Coordinator of Radiation Therapy & Medical Dosimetry Grand Valley State University.
    Summary
    Collaboration among Higher Education and Medical Institutions is essential for preparation of a competent workforce. Contextual healthcare cultural elements and interprofessional competencies are best learned within the medical setting. This collaborative study examines the impact of intensive contextual learning for students in SLP graduate programs on successful entry to medical internships and employment. Paired t-test analyses of survey responses revealed that after contextual learning experiences, students reported a greater understanding of medical systems, knowledge of interdisciplinary approaches, and confidence in accessing medical settings. Findings will be discussed as related to a sustainable collaborative instructional pedagogy for multiple disciplines.

    Learning Objectives
  • Identify essential elements of instructional pedagogy identified as having an impact on student learning outcomes.
  • Evaluate interprofessional roles/responsibilities, tenets of teamwork, and effective communication practices in a medical setting among health care providers.
  • Discuss the alignment of personnel preparation development and the future workforce in medical settings.
  • x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S11)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions D (10:00-11:30 AM)

    Location
    No Room

    An Alumni Mentorship Program to Support BIPOC Students (.1 CEUs)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions D (10:00-11:30 AM)

    Speakers
    • Katherine Mulcahy (she/her) - Director of Alumni Relations
      Katherine (Katie) Mulcahy is Director of Alumni Relations at MGH Institute of Health Professions. In this capacity and with an eye toward institutional priorities, she strategically creates opportunities for the alumni and students to engage in ways that support their professional and personal interests. Operationally, Katie is the leader within the Alumni Office and as such is tasked with developing, disseminating, and monitoring processes and policies related to alumni data.
    • Lesley A. Maxwell, M.S., CCC-SLP - Associate Department Chair
      Lesley Maxwell, is an Associate Professor, Director of Clinical Education and Director of the Speech, Language and Literacy Clinic. She is an expert in clinical education and coaching practices. Her clinical expertise is in early childhood disorders of communication, and oral language and literacy instruction in regular education classrooms.
    • Marjorie Nicholas, Ph.D., CCC-SLP (she/her) - Department Chair
      Marjorie Nicholas is Professor and Associate Chair of the CSD Department at MGH Institute of Health Professions in Boston. She has co-authored research articles and presented nationally on aphasia. At the Institute she founded the Aphasia Center based on the Life Participation Approach to Aphasiai, and which operates as a student clincial training site.
    Summary
    This talk will describe the MGH Institute’s Alumni Mentorship Program (AMP) that matches CSD students identifying as BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and people of color) with BIPOC alumni mentors, provides training and support to mentors, and builds an alumni and student community committed to justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion. The program was developed to address the disproportionately low number of faculty and professionals from diverse backgrounds in the field with only 8.5% of ASHA members and affiliates identifying as races other than white (ASHA, 2021) and the need for more student mentoring programs in CSD (Mohapatra, Mohan, 2021).

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe the evidence-based need for mentorship programs for BIPOC CSD students.
  • Develop a mentorship program given model procedures for mentor-student matching, mentor training, and BIPOC community building.
  • Develop mentorship program outcome measures.
  • Creating an Intensive Group Therapy Model to Enhance SLP Clinical Education (.05 CEUs)

    April 14 - Posters B (11:30 AM-12:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Benigno Valles, Ph.D.., CCC-SLP - Clinical Associate Professor/Clinic Director
      Dr. Benigno Valles is a Clinical Associate Professor and Director of Clinics at the University of Texas-El Paso, Speech-Language Pathology Program. He is a certified bilingual (English/Spanish) clinician with research interests in multicultural/multilingual issues especially accent modification and speech sound disorders. Dr. Valles has presented at local, state, national and international conferences.
    • Deena G. Peterson, M.S., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Clinical Instructor
      Deena G. Peterson, M.S., CCC-SLP is an El Paso, Texas native who serves as a clinical instructor at the University of Texas at El Paso. She has over 15 years of experience serving and treating the El Paso community through settings including Early Childhood Intervention, home health, and currently, the university. She has completed research in the areas of voice and clinical education.
    • Kelly Lambeth, M.S., CCC-SLP - Clinical Instructor
      Kelly Lambeth M.S., CCC-SLP is a speech language pathologist and a clinical instructor at the University of Texas -El Paso (UTEP). She has a research background in traumatic brain injury and clinical instruction. She is a member of the El Paso Speech and Hearing Association and the American Speech Hearing Association.
    • Vannesa Mueller, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor/Department Chair
      Vannesa Mueller, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is an Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences at the University of Texas at El Paso. Her research interests include Augmentative and Alternative Communication, literacy, and Autism Spectrum Disorder.
    Summary
    An effective SLP program must provide clinical education that varies in exposure to communication disorders across the lifespan and provides clinical experiences with diverse populations. The UTEP SLP program trialed a summer, intensive group therapy program to supplement our traditional on-campus practicum experiences. Our model aimed at enhancing hands-on clinical experiences and exposure to various communication disorders, medical diagnoses, and culturally and linguistically diverse populations. The decision-making processes, final model, outcomes of the program, and lessons learned will be discussed. Data included surveys on student perception and client satisfaction, and outcome measures for the communication goals of the clients.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe the methods for designing an intensive group therapy program for clinical practicum.
  • Identify two to three reasons intensive group therapy models can positively impact clinical education.
  • List assessment methods for gathering outcome data.
  • Effects of Self-reflection on the Perceived Value Peer Feedback (.05 CEUs)

    April 14 - Posters B (11:30 AM-12:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Jennifer M. Fisher, Ed.D., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Associate Professor
      Dr. Jennifer Fisher is an Associate Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Harding University in Searcy Arkansas. She has worked at the university level since 2007. Current research interests include the scholarship of teaching and learning. Jennifer serves as the President of the Board for Stirrups and Smiles, a local non-profit equine-assisted therapy program, and is a member of the American Hippotherapy Association.
    Summary
    Programs are challenged with creating lifelong learners who are expected to synthesize new information while engaging in interdisciplinary practices. In addition, new graduates must provide services in a team-oriented approach requiring strong soft skills. Becoming proficient in providing and receiving feedback can improve soft skills such as communication, collaboration, and adaptability. This presentation will discuss the results of self-reflection on the peer feedback process and provide instructors with best practices for implementing provision of feedback in academic courses..

    Learning Objectives
  • Discuss the importance of targeting soft skills with CSD students.
  • Define self-regulated learning and its role in developing lifelong learners.
  • Explain the role of self-reflection on the perceived value of peer feedback.
  • Evaluating Professional Practice Competencies: A Student-Centered Assessment Model (.05 CEUs)

    April 14 - Posters B (11:30 AM-12:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Jade H. Robinson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Program Coordinator; Associate Professor
      Jade Robinson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an Associate Professor in Communication Sciences & Disorders (CSD) at Eastern Kentucky University. Jade serves as CSD Program Coordinator and CSD Coordinator for the Autism Certificate Program. Her clinical research interests include language and emergent literacy development, early intervention, and caregiver-implemented strategies that facilitate language development. She teaches a variety of courses, including language development, language assessment, diagnostics, school-based services, and augmentative & alternative communication.
    • Kellie C. Ellis, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Department Chair; Professor
      Kellie Ellis, Ph.D.CCC/SLP is a Professor and Department Chair at Eastern Kentucky University. She teaches coursework in child language and speech sound disorders. Kellie is a former Chair of the Kentucky Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, Kentucky Speech-Language-Hearing Association (KSHA) President, and Chair of ASHA’s Governmental Relations/Public Policy Board. She currently serves as KSHA Governmental Relations/PAC Chair and is a Governor appointee on Kentucky’s Council on Postsecondary Education.
    Summary
    From collaborative ability and advocacy to interaction skills and self-reflection, a myriad of professional practice competencies are required for effective clinical service delivery. Accreditation standards specify that training programs document student attainment of professional practice competencies. In fact, recent revisions to accreditation standards attempt to streamline and provide clarity related to professional practice competencies. Despite their significance, these clinical skills can be difficult to operationalize and directly assess. This presentation will provide an overview of a systematic method of evaluating graduate students’ professional practice competencies. Resources, including assessment rubrics, documentation methods, and self-reflection prompts, will be shared and demonstrated.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe changes related to professional practice competencies in the 2023 CAA accreditation standards.
  • Discuss the rationale for frequent assessment of professional practice competencies in CSD graduate programs.
  • Identify steps to develop a professional practice competencies assessment policy.
  • Experiential Learning Opportunities in Dysphagia Management: Developing Labs for Graduate CSD Students (.05 CEUs)

    April 14 - Posters B (11:30 AM-12:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Brittany Khan, M.S., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Clinic Director
      Brittany L. Khan, M.S., CCC-SLP is the Director of the Center for Speech and Language Disorders at Monmouth University. She received her B.S. from Stockton College and her M.S. from Seton Hall University. Her areas of clinical and research interests include clinical supervision, disordered swallowing and Rett Syndrome with special interests in head and neck cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.
    • Cathleen Givney, M.S., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Specialist Professor
      Cathleen Givney, M.S., CCC-SLP is a specialist professor in the Department of Speech-Language Pathology at Monmouth University. Cathleen Givney obtained her Master’s degree from NYU. Cathleen has continued her clinical career in the medical speech-language pathology field, working in acute care hospitals and rehabilitation centers. Currently, Cathleen maintains her clinical practice in the NICU at RWJ University Hospital. Cathleen teaches coursework in swallowing disorders and pediatric feeding disorders.
    Summary
    As COVID-19 restrictions begin to ease, Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) programs are returning to in-person instruction, underscoring the importance of robust, hands-on clinical training. In the spring of 2022, Monmouth University’s Department of Speech-Language Pathology launched a new clinical education program incorporating high-fidelity simulation and hands-on lab exercises. As a component of Monmouth’s dysphagia course, Assessment and Treatment of Dysphagia, this program helps students connect classrooms and clinics through meaningful exercises in a safe learning environment.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe how hands-on learning opportunities enhance skill acquisition in dysphagia management.
  • List key components of a successful clinical simulation lab for dysphagia.
  • Conduct a hands-on clinical skills lab at their own institution, using some of the strategies presented in this poster.
  • Exploring and Promoting Strengths-based Clinical Writing of Undergraduate CSD Students (.05 CEUs)

    April 14 - Posters B (11:30 AM-12:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Jennifer A. Brown, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Associate Professor and Graduate Coordinator
      Jennifer Brown, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is Associate Professor and Graduate Coordinator in the Department of Communication Sciences and Special Education at the University of Georgia. Dr. Brown’s research is focused on improving communication outcomes in natural environments through collaborative practices. She has peer-reviewed publications and presentations in the areas of collaborative communication intervention in inclusive settings; parent-implemented intervention; family-centered and culturally responsive early intervention; and professional development.
    Summary
    Strengths-based clinical writing, a key component to family- and person-centered care, includes describing observations in objective behavioral terms with a focus on abilities as opposed to interpretative deficits-focused writing. High levels of deficit-centered language in recent research highlights the need for systematic instructional approaches to increasing students’ use of strengths-based clinical writing from the beginning of their discipline-specific education. This session will report the results of a SoTL study that examined: (a) the extent of undergraduate CSD students’ strengths-based writing in clinical observations; and (b) the impact of self-evaluation and peer feedback on students’ inclusion of strengths-based language.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe key features of strengths-based clinical writing.
  • Discuss two ways of supporting students’ use of strengths-based writing.
  • List implications from the study results.
  • Impact of Training on Knowledge and Practices in Clinical Supervision (.05 CEUs)

    April 14 - Posters B (11:30 AM-12:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Elizabeth Wooden, M.A., CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor of Clinical Communication Disorders
      Elizabeth Wooden, M.A., CCC-SLP is a Clinical Instructor of Communication Disorders at LSU Health Shreveport. She earned a B.A. in Communication Sciences and Disorders with Minors in Linguistics and Psychology (2004) and M.A. in Communication Disorders (2006) from LSU-Baton Rouge. She has practiced speech-language pathology across settings including private pediatric clinics, Early Steps, and public schools. Her interests include multi-disciplinary assessment, early intervention, Autism Spectrum Disorder, and pediatric language disorders.
    • Heather Anderson, Ed.D., CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor of Clinical Communication Disorders
      Heather Anderson, Ed.D., CCC-SLP is Assistant Professor of Clinical Communication Disorders at LSU Health Shreveport. She earned a B.A. in English Education from Centenary College of Louisiana (1991), an M.A. in SLP (1994), and an Ed.D. in educational leadership (2019) from Louisiana Tech University. Prior to joining the faculty, she practiced in schools, SNF, and hospital settings. Research interests include teaching and learning, supervision, and acquired communication and swallowing disorders.
    • Julie Smith, M.A., CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor of Clinical Communication Disorders
      Julie Smith, MA, CCC-SLP, is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Communication Disorders at LSU Health Shreveport. She holds the Certificate of Clinical Competence and is licensed to practice in the state of Louisiana. Her teaching interests include Clinical Methods and Practicum in Speech-Language Pathology, Diagnostic Methods, and Ethics in Speech-Language Pathology. Her research interests include early intervention, clinical supervision, and treatment of child speech and language disorders.
    Summary
    The importance of training in knowledge and skills specific to supervision has received increased attention in recent years, leading to the implementation of a two-hour ASHA continuing education requirement and the recognition of supervision as a distinct area of practice and scholarship. However, evidence is limited regarding the optimal and necessary amount or intensity of training. This mixed-method pretest-posttest study is investigating the impact of two hours of training on speech-language pathologists’ knowledge and planned practices in clinical supervision. Recommendations regarding the preparation of clinical supervisors and future scholarships will be provided.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe current evidence in preparation of clinical supervision, including a current study on the impact of training on supervisory knowledge and practices.
  • Identify strategies and resources for enhancing knowledge and skills related to clinical supervision.
  • Identify research needs, opportunities and strategies related to preparation of clinical educators.
  • Impact of Year-long Teaching Symposium on Faculty Implementation of Evidence-based Education Approaches (.05 CEUs)

    April 14 - Posters B (11:30 AM-12:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Joan Besing, Ph.D., CCC/A - Professor and Director of Clinical Graduate Programs
      Joan Besing, Ph.D., CCC-A is a Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Montclair State Universtiy. She was a member of the ad-hoc planning committee representing current CAA members for the ASHA 2016 Audiology Summit on AuD Education. She is the primary presenter.
    • Julie Honaker, Ph.D., CCC-A - Section Head, Audiology
      Julie A. Honaker, Ph.D. CCC-A is the Section Head of Audiology, Head and Neck Institute, and the Director of the Vestibular and Balance Disorders Program at the Cleveland Clinic, and Adjunct Professor at the University of Akron. Prior to joining the Cleveland Clinic in 2016, she was an Associate Professor at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln with her teaching and research program focused on vestibular and balance sciences.
    • Loretta M. Nunez, MA, AuD, CCC-A/SLP, (she/her/hers) - Senior Director, Academic Affairs and Research Education
      Loretta Nunez, M.A., Au.D., CCC-A/SLP, ASHA Fellow, FNAP, is ASHA’s Senior Director of Academic Affairs & Research Education. She directs activities supporting academic, clinical and research education encompassing educational initiatives, personnel preparation, and higher education trends and forecasting. She leads ASHA's strategic objective to advance interprofessional education and collaborative practice. Loretta has worked in both academic and clinical settings prior to joining ASHA.
    • Radhika Aravamudhan, Ph.D., CCC-A - Dean
      Dr. Aravamudhan serves as the Dean of Osborne College of Audiology at Salus University in Pennsylvania. Dr. Aravamudhan previously served as an academic audiology member and the Vice Chair for Audiology on the CAA. She currently serves on the Academic Affairs Board for ASHA and an incoming Vice President for Academic Affairs-Audiology on ASHA Board. She also serves on CAPCSD'S admission committee.
    Summary
    This session will include a review of the year-long Teaching Symposium on Foundational CSD Science Courses, Innovations in Teaching and Learning: Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences. The participants engaged in a two-week Teaching Symposium and year-long monthly discussions. The focus will be on the results of pre- and post-symposium participant survey responses. Specifically, there will be a discussion of participant response trends and themes highlighting changes in attitudes regarding the use of tools and techniques supported by SoTL and evidence-based education approaches. The session emphasizes the importance of these approaches in CSD pedagogy.

    Learning Objectives
  • Discuss survey responses and changes in attitudes regarding the use of tools and techniques to engage students in active learning activities that are supported by evidence-based education.
  • Summarize respondents’ levels of motivation to use evidence-informed strategies to improve teaching practice after participation in the Teaching Symposium.
  • Discuss survey responses and changes in attitudes regarding the use of tools and techniques to engage students in active learning activities that are supported by evidence-based education.
  • International Collaboration in Speech-language Pathology: A Fulbright Project in Kosovo (.05 CEUs)

    April 14 - Posters B (11:30 AM-12:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Dafina Veselaj, Licensed Speech Therapist, Kosovo - Speech Therapist, Heimerer College Clinic
      Dafina Veselaj is a licensed speech therapist in Kosovo. She works at Heimerer College as clinical practice coordinator. Her role is to provide student placement during five clinical practices and internships. She is engaged in projects funded by Erasmus+. She initiated the Fulbright Project. Her interest is rooted in providing international education for Kosovar students as far as the field of speech therapy is still in early stages of development.
    • Myra Schatzki, M.S., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Associate Clinical Professor
      Myra Schatzki, M.S., CCC-SLP, Clinical Associate Professor at Arizona State University, College of Health Solutions, Speech and Hearing Science program has an interest in and experience working with international students. She participated in the Fulbright Project to examine the feasibility of global education at Heimerer College in Prishtina, Kosovo. She provided online synchronous instruction to undergraduate students. She collaborated with Victoria Clark and Dafina Veselay in evaluating their speech therapy curriculum.
    • Victoria Clark, M.A., M.S., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Clinical Assistant Professor
      Victoria Clark, M.A., M.S., CCC-SLP serves as an Assistant Clinical Professor of Communication Sciences & Disorders in the College of Health Solutions at Arizona State University. Her background as an SLP is in pediatric speech-language disorders, school-based services and bilingualism/multilingualism (English and Spanish). She studied Linguistics at the University of Michigan and earned Master's degrees in Applied Linguistics/TESL, as well as Communication Sciences & Disorders, from Northern Arizona University.
    Summary
    Inclusive environments in Speech-Language Pathology ideally approach client and clinician languages and cultures with humility, respect and appreciation. This approach can also embrace innovation and implementing evidence-based practices in the field. In the summer of 2022, a Fulbright collaboration designed by Heimerer College in Kosovo invited Arizona State University Clinical Faculty to conduct a series of workshops, a curriculum review, and clinical collaboration in pediatric speech-language disorders. These trainings were designed to support multilingual, multicultural higher education in communication disorders in Kosovo. Heimerer College prioritizes continual innovation in healthcare professions in their academic training and clinical services.

    Learning Objectives
  • Identify ways that SLPs can innovate and collaborate across languages and cultures to create inclusive environments.
  • Give examples of how cultural humility can be employed to support the success of multicultural and multilingual collaborations in Speech-Language Pathology.
  • Describe how Fulbright grants can support international collaboration and capacity building in Speech-Language Pathology.
  • Scoping Review to Characterize Construct of Learning Alliance in Health Professions Education (.05 CEUs)

    April 14 - Posters B (11:30 AM-12:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Esther Debbie Lee, SLPD, CCC-SLP, M.A., (she/her/hers) - Clinical Assistant Professor
      E. Debbie Lee, SLPD, CCC-SLP is a pediatric speech-language pathologist, learning disabilities specialist, and clinical assistant professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Northwestern University. Debbie’s primary areas of interest include the importance of school-based SLPs as agents of change in schools. In addition, she is interested in learning alliances in higher education - the focus of her culminating project for her clinical doctorate.
    • Stacy Kaplan, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Director, MS & SLPD programs; Clinical Associate Professor
      Stacy Kaplan (she/her) Ph.D., CCC-SLP, Clinical Associate Professor, is the director of the MS (SLP) and SLP-D programs at Northwestern University. The broad mission of her scholarship is to transform the field's approaches to education across the learning continuum via data-informed (1) pedagogical and curricular innovation and (2) approaches to faculty development as they relate to the development of CSD professionals.
    Summary
    Learning alliance between educators/supervisors and learners/supervisees is broadly studied in health professions education to characterize the environments and conditions that enhance clinical learning and to define effective modes of learning and mastery. This work is a preliminary step toward mapping and characterizing the existing literature of learning alliance including speech-language pathology. Three statistically significant interventions were studied amidst sixty-seven studies as possible interventions for approaches in supervision and clinical education.

    Learning Objectives
  • Discuss the current landscape of literature about learning alliance in health professions education.
  • Describe four perspectives of focus in alliance.
  • Discuss potential implications for clinical supervision.
  • TeamSTEPPS as Interprofessional Education Training (.05 CEUs)

    April 14 - Posters B (11:30 AM-12:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Emma Miller, MSW, LCSW, (she/her/hers) - Assistant Professor, HRSA BHWET Project Coordinator
      Emma Miller, MSW, LCSW, an Assistant Professor in the Western Carolina University Department of Social Work, has a focus on integrated healthcare and interprofessional education. She is the Project Coordinator for a HRSA Behavioral Health Workforce Education and Training (BHWET) for Professionals grant and a NC and FL licensed clinical social worker.
    • Johanna Price, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Associate Professor
      Johanna Price, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Western Carolina University in Cullowhee, NC. Her interests include language and literacy development, assessment, and intervention for children and adolescents with a variety of backgrounds, including those with neurodevelopmental disabilities and culturally diverse backgrounds. Her interests also encompass interprofessional education and practice and evidence-based practice. She has authored over 25 publications and 60 presentations.
    • Tracie Rice, AuD, CCC-A, (she/her/hers) - Associate Professor of Clinical Practice, Clinic Director
      Tracie Rice is an audiologist and Associate Professor of Clinical Practice in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Western Carolina University. She is also the clinic director for the Speech and Hearing Clinic. A primary focus of her clinic work and research is incorporating interprofessional education and practice into all aspects of service delivery.
    Summary
    Teamwork among professionals and students in different disciplines is highly valued in health- and education-related fields, including speech-language pathology (SLP); yet, little research has investigated how to best train SLP students to work in teams with other disciplines. In this study, we adapted an evidence-based program (i.e., TeamSTEPPS; Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 2019) to teach communication and teamwork skills to students in SLP and Social Work. Immediately after the training, most participants “agreed” or “highly agreed” that TeamSTEPPS was acceptable, appropriate, and feasible. We will also report participants’ perceptions of TeamSTEPPS training 6 months after the event.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe how to adapt TeamSTEPPS for an interprofessional audience of health and human sciences graduate students.
  • Explain how to use TeamSTEPPS to increase student engagement within and across disciplines.
  • State findings from an investigation of the acceptability of TeamSTEPPS training for an interprofessional audience of graduate students.
  • The Use of Simulation in CSD: A Follow up Survey (.05 CEUs)

    April 14 - Posters B (11:30 AM-12:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Carol C. Dudding, CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Professor
      Carol Dudding, Ph.D.,CCC-SLP, is Professor at James Madison University. She holds a degree in Instructional Technology. Carol's areas of research centers on the uses of technology for clinical education and instruction, including simulations, telesupervision and distance education. Carol is an ASHA Fellow, and Certified Healthcare Simulation Educator. She is serves on the ASHA Board of Directors and is Past President of CAPCSD.
    • Richard I. Zraick, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, CHSE - Professor
      Richard I. Zraick, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, F-ASHA, CHSE holds the rank of Professor in the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Central Florida, where he previously served as the School's founding director. His clinical, research and teaching activities are in the areas of voice disorders, clinical skills training, healthcare simulation, and health literacy. He is an ASHA Fellow. He is also a Certified Health Simulation Educator.
    Summary
    This poster presents the results of a national survey examining the current use of simulations in the field of communication sciences and disorders, comparing them to the results of an earlier study by the primary author (2016). Results will be examined through the lens of pre-COVID and current patterns of use. The current survey gathers information about program experiences with simulation during the initial years of the pandemic, and within the current academic environment.

    Learning Objectives
  • Examine factors impacting the use of simulations in CSD over the last 6 years.
  • Identify perceived strengths and challenges experienced in the use of simulations.
  • Formulate recommendations for best practices in simulation-based learning moving forward.
  • x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S12)

    April 14 - Posters B (11:30 AM-12:00 PM)

    Location
    No Room

    Using Objective Rating Scales to Assess and Measure Student Outcomes in CALIPSO (.1 CEUs)

    April 14 - Lunch (12:00-1:30 PM)

    Speakers
    • Amy Dickson, MHA, M.S., CCC-SLP - Client Development Manager
    Summary
    This presentation will provide a live demonstration of how an objective Rating Scale is used to rate students’ clinical performances in CALIPSO for Speech-Language Pathology® and CALIPSO for Audiology®. This demonstration will also show how student outcomes are measured over time and will help programs show that students are making progress toward meeting or have met CFCC and CAA standards.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe how to implement an objective rating scale in CALIPSO.
  • Identify how objective ratings are used to track clinical competency of standards
  • Identify how student outcomes are tracked in CALIPSO
  • x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S13)

    April 14 - Lunch (12:00-1:30 PM)

    Location
    No Room

    Best Practices in Tele Supervision (.15 CEUs)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions E (1:30-3:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Jessica Carter, M.S. CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Director of Clinical Education
      Jessica Carter, M.S. CCC-SLP, is the Director of Clinical Education for the Master of Science Program in Speech-Language Pathology at the University of Texas at Dallas. She teaches courses in preschool assessment & intervention, motor speech disorders, and bilingual articulation/phonology; and supervises graduate students in pediatric programs. Ms. Carter is active in the Texas Speech-Language Hearing Association and currently serves as the organization’s Vice President for Research and Development.
    • Stephanie L, Fowler, AuD, Ph.D., (she/her/hers) - Clinical Asst Professor & Director of Clinical Education
      Stephanie L. Fowler, Ph.D., AuD, ABA-C is Director of AuD Clinical Education at The University of Texas at Dallas. She earned her bachelor's degree at Wichita State University and her AuD and Ph.D. at The University of Texas at Dallas. She is interested in the scholarship of teaching and learning in the clinical environment, simulated educational opportunities, and expanding interprofessional education and practice to drive adaptability in graduates.
    Summary
    As a result of COVID-19, telehealth applications increased, as did the opportunity to supervise clinical students using remote technology applications. CSD educational programs must ensure that the application of these new methodologies meets accreditation and certification standards, as well as state and federal regulations. This session will provide the participant with information and resources to successfully implement tele supervision within CSD programs.

    Learning Objectives
  • Identify best practices for supervising students virtually.
  • Describe barriers or limitations of virtual supervision.
  • List the requirements for tele supervision that meet accreditation and certification standards.
  • CAA Update (.15 CEUs)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions E (1:30-3:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Gretchen Ehret Hoshaw, MA, CCC-SLP, ICE-CCP, CAE - Chief Accreditation Officer
      Gretchen Ehret Hoshaw, MA, CCC-SLP, ICE-CCP, CAE is the Chief Accreditation Officer at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and ex-officio to the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA).
    • Mary Sue Fino-Szumski, Ph.D., M.B.A., CCC-A, - Assistant Professor and Director of Clinical Education
      Mary Sue Fino-Szumski, Ph.D., M.B.A., CCC-A is Director of Clinical Education and Associate Professor, Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine/Vanderbilt University Medical Center. She teaches and guest lectures on management topics and is the CAA 2023 Chair.
    Summary
    This session will focus on the current work of the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA) related to upcoming revisions to the 2017 Standards, which go into effect on January 1, 2023. The accreditation processes will be reviewed. The most frequently cited standards in accreditation decisions and appropriate responses to citations will also be discussed.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe updates to Standards and accreditation processes to complete.
  • Discuss Standards interpretation and application.
  • Describe the appropriate program responses to citations in annual reports and reaccreditation reports.
  • Infusing Health Literacy Education and Research into the CSD Curriculum (.1 CEUs)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions E (1:30-3:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Bonnie K. Slavych, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, ACUE, (she/her/hers) - Assistant Professor
      Bonnie K. Slavych, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, ACUE is an Assistant Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders with Missouri State University. Dr. Slavych teaches graduate courses in voice disorders, swallowing disorders, and motor speech disorders as well as undergraduate courses related to assessment and management in speech language pathology. Her areas of research include the development of patient-reported outcome measures and health literacy.
    • Richard I. Zraick, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, CHSE, - Professor
      Richard I. Zraick, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, F-ASHA, CHSE holds the rank of Professor in the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Central Florida, where he previously served as the School's founding director. His clinical, research and teaching activities are in the areas of voice disorders, clinical skills training, healthcare simulation, and health literacy. He is an ASHA Fellow. He is also a Certified Health Simulation Educator.
    Summary
    Poor health literacy is a major predictor of poor health outcomes. Students studying communication disorders need more knowledge and targeted training about health literacy to provide optimal care to persons at risk for low health literacy. This presentation will (1) define health literacy and its influence as a social determinant of health (2) give examples of how health literacy education has been infused into the classroom and clinic settings and (3) share findings of a programmatic line of research investigating health literacy that has been conducted by CSD students and published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at scientific conferences.

    Learning Objectives
  • Define health literacy
  • Describe how concepts related to health literacy can be infused into the communication sciences and disorders curriculum
  • Describe how health literacy research specific to communication disorders can be conducted by undergraduate and graduate students
  • Problem Solving and Information Exchange: Optimizing Undergraduate Advising (.15 CEUs)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions E (1:30-3:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Danai Fannin, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Associate Professor
      Danai Kasambira Fannin Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an associate professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at North Carolina Central University. She is a licensed Speech-Language Pathologist with research interests in appropriate services for culturally and linguistically diverse people, communication intervention for young children with developmental disabilities in interdisciplinary contexts, and determinants of access to autism services for children and families in underserved and rural areas.
    • Danielle Watson, Ph.D. CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Danielle Watson Ph.D., CCC-SLP is an Associate Professor, Admissions Coordinator, and Clinic Coordinator in the Speech Pathology and Audiology Department at Tennessee State University. She serves on the Admissions Committee for the Council of Academic Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders (CAPCSD), the Council for Clinical Certification in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CFCC), and is a member of the Foundation Board for the Tennessee Association of Audiologists and Speech-Language Pathologists.
    • Erin S. Burns, Au.D., (they/them/theirs) - Audiology Clinic Director
      Erin S. Burns, Au.D.., CCC-A, is the Audiology Clinic Director and Admissions Chair in the Department of Speech & Hearing Sciences at Lamar University. They are a member of CAPCSD's Admissions Committee. They also serve their local area public school districts' audiology needs and manage certifications for hearing and vision screening personnel in the schools and nursing community. Their interests are in DEI in graduate admissions and evidence-based clinical practice.
    • Karen Villanueva, M.S. - Lecturer
      Karen Villanueva, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, is a lecturer and the undergraduate program coordinator in the School of Communication Disorders and Deafness at Kean University in NJ. Her primary teaching and clinical interests include the evaluation and management of dysphagia, voice, and acquired motor speech disorders in adults.
    • Leigh G. Schaid, Au.D. - Associate Professor
      Leigh G. Schaid, AuD, is an Associate Professor at Pacific University. She serves as a clinical provider, preceptor, and instructor in the AuD program. Her area of practice includes pediatric diagnostics, with a focus on the birth-three population. Her research interests focus on holistic review in health professions admissions. Currently, she is also pursuing a Ph.D. in education and leadership through Pacific University.
    • Nicole Reisfeld, SLPD, (she/her/hers) - Program Coordinator
      Nicole Reisfeld, SLPD, CCC-SLP is an Instructor and graduate Program Coordinator at the University of Northern Colorado. Areas of interest include graduate admissions processes, Community Engaged Learning, and support and supervision of graduate clinical experiences
    Summary
    This facilitated session provides an opportunity for stakeholders to discuss successes, challenges, and goals within the undergraduate advising landscape. Topics may include curricula, observation and clinical experiences, complimentary majors and minors, increasing awareness and engagement with the profession, meeting the needs of diverse advisees, and strategies for advising students towards a successful path if they do not initially gain acceptance into graduate programs, among others. This discussion-based event will promote creative problem-solving and sharing among attendees, with the goal of fostering dialogue among the broader undergraduate advising space.

    Learning Objectives
  • Identify best practices for advising on complimentary majors and minors.
  • Identify the diversity of advising needs for undergraduates.
  • Develop strategies to increase undergraduates’ awareness and engagement with the profession.
  • The Ins and Outs of Curriculum Mapping (.15 CEUs)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions E (1:30-3:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Leanna Lawrence, MHS, CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Associate Clinical Professor/Clinic Director
      Leanna Lawrence, MHS, CCC-SLP, is an Associate Clinical Professor in the Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences at the University of Missouri. She currently serves as the director of their on-site clinic and also supports graduate students in securing their off-campus placements. Additionally, Professor Lawrence teaches several clinic-based courses for the department.
    Summary
    Curriculum mapping is essential for programs to identify gaps, redundancies, and misalignments to ensure content is balanced and aligned with both organizational expectations and accreditation standards. After reviewing intended outcomes of curriculum mapping, this session will present various mapping methodologies and provide suggestions for achieving those outcomes. Barriers to effective curriculum mapping will also be discussed.

    Learning Objectives
  • State information that can be gained from curriculum mapping.
  • Describe types of coherence within an effective curriculum.
  • Discuss barriers and solutions pertaining to curriculum mapping.
  • Toward Diversity and Beyond: Embracing Equity and Inclusion in Academic Programs (.1 CEUs)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions E (1:30-3:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Iona Johnson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Assistant Provost for Diversity & Inclusion
      Dr. Johnson is the Assistant Provost for Diversity & Inclusion at Towson University. In her previous role as Clinical Associate Professor, she established the Minority Student Mentoring Group in the department of Speech-Language Pathology & Audiology. She holds B.S. degrees in Speech Language Pathology & Psychology from the George Washington University; M.S. in Speech-Language Pathology from Loyola University and Ph.D. in Gerontology from University of Maryland at Baltimore County (UMBC).
    • Judy Blackburn, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Director of Academic and Clinical Education
      Judy Blackburn, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is the Director of Academic and Clinical Education at the ASHA national office. She provides expert consultation on matters relating to the educational preparation of SLPs, audiologists, and researchers in communication sciences and disorders (CSD). Judy has over 15 years’ experience working in a variety of academic and clinical settings, including Towson University, Kennedy Krieger Institute, and Baltimore City Public Schools.
    Summary
    Data from the CSD Education Survey shows a steady increase in the percentage of students from historically underrepresented racial and ethnic groups in CSD academic programs. While this is great news, increasing the number of underrepresented students does not automatically translate to providing the framework to support students from admission through graduation. This presentation will provide examples of specific strategies, such as student mentoring, financial support opportunities, and professional development training for faculty and students. We propose a multidimensional approach to change the climate and the culture of academic programs to ensure the success of historically underrepresented students.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe three trends in the enrollment and graduation of historically underrepresented racial and ethnic groups in undergraduate, clinical graduate, and research graduate programs in CSD.
  • Identify three areas of need for increasing equity and inclusion of underrepresented students in CSD academic programs.
  • Analyze three approaches for supporting the recruitment and retention of underrepresented students in CSD academic programs.
  • Trauma Informed Pedagogy: Supporting Our Students (.15 CEUs)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions E (1:30-3:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Kimberly D. Christian, LMHC, (she/her/hers) - Co-Owner
      Kimberly Christian is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor and co-owner of Trauma Healing Collective. She has been working in the field of trauma since 2012. Kimberly is certified in Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP) and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), She is also a Qualified Supervisor for Mental Health Counselors in the state of Florida. Additionally, Kimberly is a consultant-in-training for EMDR clinicians.
    • Shea Atkin, LMT, TTT, (she/her/hers) - Co-Owner
      Shea Atkin, Licensed Somatic Therapist and Co-Owner of Trauma Healing Collective. She has been a practicing massage therapist since 2001 with a trauma-specific focus since 2010. Shea is a Certified Trauma Touch Therapist™ (TTT™) and CranioSacral Therapist. She is also a TTT™ Support Facilitator. Because of her focus on how trauma manifests in the body, her work helps relieve the stress cycle caused by trauma.
    Summary
    Current students in CSD programs may have been exposed to trauma. Trauma-informed pedagogy considers the effect trauma may have on learning new information. This session will review the principles of trauma-informed pedagogy and provide strategies for enhancing learning by CSD students using this information.

    Learning Objectives
  • Define trauma and its impact on the CSD learning experience.
  • Identify signs of trauma in students.
  • Apply trauma-informed strategies to the CSD learning environment.
  • Use of Sim-IPE in Preparation for Acute Care Placements (.1 CEUs)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions E (1:30-3:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Carolyn G. Perry, M.S., CCC-SLP - Asst. Prof., Dir. of Clinical Ed.
      Carolyn Perry is an assistant professor and director of clinical education for the SLP Program at TTUHSC. She jointed the faculty in 2004 following 12 years of work in hospital and long-term care facilities. She strives to blend opportunities for collaborative learning into classroom and clinical experiences.
    • Megan Taylor, OTD - Academic Fieldwork Coordinator, Assistant Professor
      Megan Taylor is an Assistant Professor in the Occupational Therapy program at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center in Lubbock, Texas. She received a master of science in occupational therapy from Washington University in St. Louis in 2004 and a doctorate in occupational therapy from Texas Woman’s University in 2018. Her clinical practice is with adult neurological populations, and she is currently practicing clinically at the Montford Prison Unit.
    • Robert Larson, OTR, Ph.D. - Assistant Professor
      Robert Larson, OTR, Ph.D. is an assistant professor of Occupational Therapy at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center. He has been involved with many interprofessional events that include students and practitioners from PT, OT, Speech, Nursing, and Medicine and continues to work for improved preparation for real-life experiences.
    • Susan L. Sneed, M.S., CCC-SLP - Clinical Instructor
      Susan Sneed, M.S., CCC-SLP, is a licensed speech-language pathologist and clinical instructor at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center.
    Summary
    Graduate students from doctoral Occupational Therapy and masters Speech-Language Pathology programs of TTUHSC School of Health Professions participated in an interprofessional simulation (Sim-IPE) activity to better prepare students for upcoming placements in medical settings. Students from each program learned with and from each other to improve foundational knowledge and proficiency related to transfers, management of medical equipment, and oral hygiene in an interprofessional environment. Furthermore, this educational opportunity allowed students to demonstrate accurate use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and infection control procedures to maximize safety of both client and health professionals.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe key components of an innovative activity for an interprofessional education learning experience.
  • Identify challenges in coordinating and supervising a multifaceted interprofessional education learning experience.
  • Discuss factors affecting student experiences in an interprofessional education learning experience.
  • Utilizing Different Grading Methodologies in CSD Education (.15 CEUs)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions E (1:30-3:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Patrick R. Walden, Ph.D. CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Patrick R. Walden, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is an Associate Professor, Chair, and SLP Program Director in the Department of Speech-Language Pathology at Monmouth University in West Long Branch, NJ. He is a nationally certified Speech-Language Pathologist with research interests in disorders of voice and speech in adults, learning theory, and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL).
    Summary
    Undergraduate and graduate students are highly focused on grades such that it can become a hindrance. There is research that has examined the impact of grading methodology on student anxiety and performance (Walden, 2022). This session will review past literature as well as discuss the implications of these current findings, leaving room for discussion about strategies that instructors are currently utilizing in the classroom.

    Learning Objectives
  • Identify student trends on educational focus.
  • Review current literature pertaining to the impact of grading methodology on student anxiety and performance.
  • Discuss and find solutions for current grading dilemmas in the classroom.
  • x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S14)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions E (1:30-3:00 PM)

    Location
    No Room

    Creating Inclusive Environments Through Authentic Scenario-based Instruction on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (.1 CEUs)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions F (3:30-5:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Kathryn Atkinson, M.A., CCC-SLP/BC-ANCDS - SLP Master Clinical Educator
      Kathryn Atkinson, M.A., CCC-SLP/BC-ANCDS is a Master Clinical Educator at Central Michigan University providing clinical and academic instruction to undergraduate and graduate students. She received and has maintained Board Certification in Neurologic Communication Disorders in Adults from the Academy of Neurologic Communication Sciences & Disorders (ANCDS) since 2009. Her clinical interest areas include mild TBI/post-concussive syndrome, adult neurogenic communication disorders, transgender voice therapy, and oral myofunctional disorders.
    • Nicholas A. Barone, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, - Assistant Professor
      Nicholas A. Barone, Ph.D., CCC‑SLP, is an assistant professor at Central Michigan University in the CSD Department and leads the NeuroVoice Lab where he studies the neurophysiology of voice, communication, and cognition using fNIRS. He has presented his research at state, national, and international conferences. His more recent focus is on providing meaningful scenario-based DEI instruction for graduate students and CSD clinicians with his collaborative team at Central Michigan University.
    • Shannon Palmer, AuD, Ph.D., CCC-A, - Professor, AuD Division Director
      Shannon B. Palmer, Au.D., Ph.D. is a Professor and Audiology Division Director at Central Michigan University. Her research and teaching areas include pediatric audiology and auditory processing disorders. She has a strong interest in increasing diversity, equity, and inclusion in the field of audiology.
    • Shannon Palmer, AuD, Ph.D., CCC-A, (she/her/hers) - Associate Professor
      Dr. Stacey R. Lim, Au.D., Ph.D., CCC-A is an Associate Professor of Audiology at Central Michigan University. Dr. Lim's areas of interest are in cochlear implants and aural rehabilitation. She was co-curator of the museum exhibition, (dis)ABLED BEAUTY: the evolution of beauty, disability, and ability. Dr. Lim was born with bilateral, profound sensorineural hearing loss and is a cochlear implant wearer
    • Theresa M. Jones, M.A., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Director of Clinical Instruction in SLP
      Theresa Jones, M.S., CCC-SLP, is the Director of Clinical Instruction and Speech-Language Services at Central Michigan University. She has been a practicing SLP for over 30 years. Theresa graduated from Howard University with a Master of Science Degree in Speech-Language Pathology and from Northwestern University with a Bachelor of Science degree. Theresa has worked in a variety of educational, medical and private practice settings in the midwest.
    Summary
    Addressing diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) can be challenging in university settings. Faculty at Central Michigan University created a scenario-based workshop to support SLP and AuD graduate students in managing challenging situations related to DEI, racism, gender-bias and discrimination. In the spirit of sharing the framework for this workshop we provide others in higher education an example of how to create inclusive environments through meaningful authentic exposure to reality-based challenging situations, allowing students to explore and unravel their own implicit-explicit biases (gut reactions), and then providing them evidence-based tools to respond to difficult situations in a more productive manner.

    Learning Objectives
  • Define the importance of creating meaningful instruction on DEI using scenario-based activities in a workshop environment to create authentic experiential learning.
  • Create an inter-professional team to develop a scenario-based DEI workshop for SLP and/or AuD graduate students using the framework provided.
  • Apply the framework for the scenario-based DEI workshop to your own diverse CSD graduate students in SLP and AuD.
  • Current Political and Public Policy Trends Impacting Higher Education and CSD Programs (.15 CEUs)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions F (3:30-5:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Lemmietta McNeilly, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, FASAE, CAE (she/her) - Chief Staff Officer, Speech-Language Pathology
      Lemmietta McNeilly, PhD, CCC-SLP, FASAE, CAE, ASHA Fellow, serves as ASHA’s Chief Staff Officer for Speech-Language Pathology, responsible for SLP Practices, Government Affairs and Public Policy, Special Interest Groups, International Programs and the Enhanced Service Delivery Strategic Objective, including practicing at the Top of the License. She has international publiications and presentations regarding the topics of innovative models of education, competency based education, working with SLPAs and functional rehabilitation outcomes.
    Summary
    The current political and public policy environment may be characterized as hyper-partisan, factionalized, and uncertain. This presentation identifies and analyzes current political and public policy trends, assesses their impact on higher education with a specific focus on CSD programs, faculty, and students, and underscores the importance of advocacy as a collaborative means by which to effect positive change.

    Learning Objectives
  • Identify current political and public policy trends in legislative, regulatory, federal, and state arenas relevant to communications sciences and disorders.
  • Understand how those trends are directly or indirectly impacting higher education, CSD academic programs, faculty, and students.
  • Take action as an advocate in partnership with ASHA and CAPCSD to effect positive change.
  • IPE for Culturally Responsive Learning in Context of Racism & Health Inequity (.1 CEUs)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions F (3:30-5:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Deborah Ambrosio Mawhirter, Ed.D., RN - Professor
      Deborah Ambrosio Mawhirter, EdD, RN, Associate Clinical Professor, Adelphi University. She is a course coordinator and the former chair of the Department of Nursing. She is a fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine. She presents her research nationally and internationally. Her awards include the Adelphi University Student Government Women’s Recognition Award for Outstanding Leadership, Service, and Commitment to Excellence, as well as Excellence in Teaching & Mentoring awards.
    • Reem Khamis-Dakwar, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Professor
      "Reem Khamis is a Professor of Speech-Language Pathology and director of the Neurophysiology in the Speech-Language Pathology Lab. She is a member of the Speech, Language, Hearing Scientists Equity Action Collective. Her research focuses on language variation and clinical service provision through an anti-racist lens. Her work has culminated in the implementation of antiracist and interprofessional curricula and the establishment of the Journal of Critical Study of Communication and Disability.
    Summary
    There is scarce research on the use of interprofessional education and practice as a solution to inequity in health systems (Cahn, 2020). The current presentation reports on the planning, implementation, and responsiveness to an interprofessional course developed for students from speech therapy, audiology, nursing, social work, and health science majors. Students focused on IPEC competencies ethics and working with a diverse population. Opportunities and challenges in conducting such initiatives as larger curricular planning to prepare the future of health professionals to take an active role in dismantling racism in the field will be discussed.

    Learning Objectives
  • Recognize the IPE Competencies as a framework to address diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in the undergraduate curriculum.
  • Discuss developing teaching and learning strategies to foster active learning activities that engage pre-professional students focusing on ethics and DEI.
  • Understand the opportunities and challenges in developing and teaching an IPE course.
  • Problem-solving and Information Exchange (PSIE) for AUD Clinic Directors (.15 CEUs)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions F (3:30-5:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Candice Osenga, Au.D. - Director of Clinical Education-Audiology
      Dr. Candice Osenga is the Director of Clinical Education for Audiology and a clinical educator at Illinois State University. Current supervision is primarily in adult diagnostics and amplification and auditory processing evaluations. Administrative duties include scheduling on-campus and externship placements, as well as planning a weekly clinic meeting for the three on-campus cohorts. Dr. Osenga is co-advisor of the local SAA chapter and holds her CCC-A and Illinois professional licensure.
    • Kelly Pritchett, Au.D., CCC-A - Associate Professor of Practice/Audiology Clinic Coordinator
      Kelly Pritchett, AuD, CCC-A, is an Associate Professor of Practice and Audiology Clinic Coordinator at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Her responsibilities include teaching in the undergraduate and graduate programs, as well as providing audiological services to individuals with hearing and balance disorders in the Barkley Speech Language and Hearing Clinic. She also oversees the clinical education of Audiology students throughout their graduate training.
    Summary
    This facilitated session provides an opportunity for AuD Clinic Directors to discuss various topics (e.g., ways to integrate OTC into your clinical practice, generational gaps in clinical education, and how to diversify payors in the university clinic setting). Questions will be addressed with an opportunity for group problem-solving and information sharing to facilitate innovative approaches.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe ways to integrate OTC into your clinical practice.
  • Characterize the generational gaps in clinical education and strategize how to bridge the gap.
  • Identify how to diversify payors in the university clinic setting to ensure a stable practice and ample clinical experiences/hours for students.
  • Problem-solving and Information Exchange (PSIE) for Chairs: Round Two (.15 CEUs)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions F (3:30-5:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Judy Wingate, M.S., Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Professor & Program Director
      Judith Wingate, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is Professor in Communication Sciences and Disorders at Jacksonville University. She received a BA in music therapy from Charleston Southern University, MS in speech-language pathology from University of South Florida, and Ph.D. in voice disorders from the University of Florida.
    Summary
    This facilitated session provides an opportunity for department chairs to discuss various topics (e.g., advocating for their program at the university level, and creating and implementing mission, vision, and value statements.). Questions will be addressed with an opportunity for group problem-solving and information sharing to facilitate innovative approaches.

    Learning Objectives
  • Discuss methods and strategies for advocating for programs at the university level.
  • Implement strategic planning methods for creating mission, vision, and values statements.
  • Explain techniques for the implementation of mission, vision, and value statements.
  • Problem-solving and Information Exchange (PSIE) for Program Directors (.15 CEUs)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions F (3:30-5:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Erica J. Williams, Ph.D. - Clinical Professor
      Erica Williams, Ph.D., CCC-A, is a Clinical Professor in the College of Health Solutions at Arizona State University. She is currently the Program Director and Clinical Placement Coordinator for the Doctor of Audiology Program. Dr. Williams teaches academic coursework in auditory/vestibular pathologies and diagnostics and is a clinical instructor in the on-campus clinic. She also participates in an annual humanitarian trip to Guaymas, Mexico.
    • Jacqueline A. Towson, Ph.D. CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Associate Professor, Graduate Program Director, Interim Associate School Director
      Jacqueline Towson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is an Associate Professor, Interim Associate School Director and Graduate Program Director in the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders at University of Central Florida. She completed her doctorate in the Education of Students with Exceptionalities following 14 years of work in public schools. Her research broadly concerns building the capacity of individuals who work with young children experiencing language impairments and those considered at-risk.
    Summary
    This facilitated session provides an opportunity for program directors to discuss various topics (e.g., organizational systems for accreditation, and methods of formative and summative assessment.) Questions will be addressed with an opportunity for group problem-solving and information sharing to facilitate innovative approaches.

    Learning Objectives
  • Discuss different organizational strategies for accreditation requirements.
  • Identify possible methodologies of formative assessment.
  • Identify possible methodologies for summative assessment.
  • Problem-solving and Information Exchange (PSIE) for SLP Clinic Directors (.15 CEUs)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions F (3:30-5:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Cara Boester, M.A.CCC-SLP - Director of Clinical Education Speech Language Pathology
      Cara Boester MA, CCC-SLP, is the Director of Clinical Experiences for Speech-Language Pathology in the CSD Department at Illinois State University. In addition to her administrative duties scheduling on-campus and externship placements, she provides speech, language, and aural rehab services to deaf/ hard of hearing clients across the age span.
    • Erin EG Lundblom, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Coordinator of SLP Clinical Education and Associate Professor
      Erin E.G. Lundblom is an Associate Professor and Director of Speech-Language Pathology Clinical Education at the University of Pittsburgh. She provides course instruction to both undergraduate and graduate students. Her areas of interest encompass best practice in the provision of clinical instruction, school-based language and literacy services including service delivery options, and higher education pedagogy.
    Summary
    This facilitated session provides an opportunity for SLP Clinic Directors to discuss various topics (e.g., securing medical placements, different clinical service delivery models in on-campus clinics, and strategies for managing and updating clinic inventory and protocols). Questions will be addressed with an opportunity for group problem-solving and information sharing to facilitate innovative approaches.

    Learning Objectives
  • Identify current challenges and solutions in securing medical clinical placements.
  • Discuss models for clinical service delivery models in on-campus clinics.
  • Present strategies for management of clinic inventory and protocols.
  • Reimagining Curriculum: Innovative Programming to Address Hearing Competencies Within Speech-Language Pathology Programs (.1 CEUs)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions F (3:30-5:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Angela Haendel, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Associate Professor and Clinic Director
      Angela Haendel. Ph.D. CCC-SLP, is an associate professor and clinic director of the Speech, Language, and Hearing Clinic at Concordia University Wisconsin. She received her Master’s of Science degree from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and her Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) from Marquette University. Angela has been a licensed speech-language pathologist since 2002. Dr. Haendel’s research interests include autism, social language, animal-assisted therapy, and fluency.
    • Kim Sesing, AuD, CCC-A, (she/her/hers) - Assistant Professor and Hearing Clinic Coordinator
      Dr. Kim Sesing is an assistant professor and hearing clinic coordinator of the Speech, Language, and Hearing Clinic at Concordia University Wisconsin (CUW). Kim has been a licensed audiologist since 1996 and has been at CUW since 2017. Her interests include diagnostic audiology and the counseling aspects of aural rehabilitation.
    Summary
    Achieving hearing-related competencies within an SLP graduate program can be challenging given the considerable focus placed on the many areas of speech-language pathology. Traditionally, graduate students have obtained hearing hours and competencies primarily through the completion of hearing screenings. Our program has initiated a model to provide varied experiences to expose students to a large range of hearing-related disorders, diagnostic testing, and aural rehabilitation through a combination of simulation, didactic instruction, classroom instruction, and a campus hearing clinic practicum. This model has allowed for the efficient achievement of hearing competencies along with the opportunity to connect audiology to speech-language pathology.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe how innovative programming can meet hearing related competencies within a SLP-only grad program.
  • List efficient ways of connecting hearing-related competencies to clinical practicum, didactic, and classroom instruction.
  • Discuss information as a group by participating in a brainstorm/Q&A open forum related to the model presented.
  • Student Resiliency and Its Potential Impact on Experiential Learning (.1 CEUs)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions F (3:30-5:00 PM)

    Speakers
    • Erasmia Benakis, M.A., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Director, Field Placement Program
      Erasmia Benakis, CCC-SLP is the Director of Field Placement for the residential and distance education program at New York University's Communicative Sciences and Disorders Department. Erasmia always had a special interest in higher education and focused specifically on the supervisor-supervisee relationship in experiential learning. Prior to joining New York University, Erasmia worked with individuals across the lifespan in both medical and educational settings. She is bilingual Greek.
    • Maria Fareri, MS, CCC- SLP, TSSLD-BE, (she/her/hers) - Field Placement Administrator
      Maria Michelle Fareri, MS, CCC-SLP, TSSLD-BE is a Clinical Field Placement Administrator for NYU's Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders. As a bilingual speech-language pathologist, Maria’s clinical focus has been with pediatric populations. She has worked with various clinical populations within NYC and Los Angeles providing services in school, private practice, and early intervention home care settings. She also has experience supervising graduate student clinicians in their field placement experiences.
    • Olivia Blake, CCC-SLP - Senior Enrollment and Field Placement Administrator
      Olivia Blake, MS, CCC-SLP is an Enrollment and Field Placement Administrator at New York University.
    • Penelope Romano, M.S., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Field Placement Administrator, Clinical Immersions Coordinator
      Maria Michelle Fareri, MS, CCC-SLP, TSSLD-BE is a Clinical Field Placement Administrator for NYU's Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders. As a bilingual speech-language pathologist, Maria’s clinical focus has been with pediatric populations. She has worked with various clinical populations within NYC and Los Angeles providing services in school, private practice, and early intervention home care settings. She also has experience supervising graduate student clinicians in their field placement experiences.
    Summary
    There is limited research focusing on the concept of emotional resilience and its impact on student success in experiential learning opportunities. Addressing emotional resilience and identifying how graduate programs can best support self-care, mental health, and self reflection may be pivotal for the successful development and application of clinical and professional competencies. This may support timely graduation, the future desire to supervise, identification/prevention of burnout, and strengthening of overall mindful interactions. This session will describe a method used to gather and analyze institutional data, and provide strategies on how to address emotional resiliency and potentially increase student resilience.

    Learning Objectives
  • Define emotional resilience and its importance for success in experiential learning activities.
  • Describe ways to gather and analyze institutional data from all involved parties to determine and understand all perspectives in the supervisory process.
  • Incorporate provided resources into current experiential learning process to better understand your student population and foster potential initiatives to support emotional resilience.
  • x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S15)

    April 14 - Concurrent Sessions F (3:30-5:00 PM)

    Location
    No Room

    Business Meeting

    April 15 - Business Meeting (8:00-9:00 AM)

    x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S16)

    April 15 - Business Meeting (8:00-9:00 AM)

    Location
    No Room

    Budgeting: An Option for Chairs and Clinic Directors (.15 CEUs)

    April 15 - Concurrent Sessions G (9:00-10:30 AM)

    Speakers
    • Colleen Le Prell, Ph.D. - Professor and Department Chair
      Colleen Le Prell, Ph.D., is the Emilie and Phil Schepps Professor of Hearing Science, Chair of the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing, and Program Head for the Ph.D. Program in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences at the University of Texas at Dallas. She has received research funding from government, industry, and philanthropic sources. Clinical, translational, and applied research in her laboratory advances understanding and prevention of noise-induced hearing loss.
    • Debra Knox, M.S. CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Clinic Director
      Debra Knox, M.S., CCC-SLP is an Associate Instructor and clinic director for the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Central Florida. Professionally, her experience spans both administrative and clinical positions in academic, non-profit, private practice and school settings. She has been a CAA site visitor for the past 3 years.
    Summary
    A sustainable budget is essential to the success of any clinic or program. This session will begin with an overview of successful budgeting strategies. After, the session will divide for more focused discussion pertaining to one’s department role: clinic chair versus clinic director.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe strategies for creating a sustainable budget.
  • Discuss barriers and facilitators to a sustainable budget.
  • Describe resources for additional learning opportunities related to budgeting.
  • Building Professionalism: Helping Students Use a Growth-based Mindset to Develop Essential Skills (.15 CEUs)

    April 15 - Concurrent Sessions G (9:00-10:30 AM)

    Speakers
    • Carrie Goodwiler, MA, CCC-SLP - Lecturer & Speech-Language Clinic Director
      "Carrie Goodwiler, MA, CCC-SLP, is the Speech-Language Clinic Director at San Diego State University. She provides course instruction to graduate students in the areas of clinical methods, ethical practice, and professionalism. Her professional interests include the treatment of speech sound disorders, the science of reading, and best practices in clinical supervision. "
    • Erin EG Lundblom, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Coordinator of SLP Clinical Education and Associate Professor
      Erin E.G. Lundblom is an Associate Professor and Director of Speech-Language Pathology Clinical Education at the University of Pittsburgh. She provides course instruction to both undergraduate and graduate students. Her areas of interest encompass best practice in the provision of clinical instruction, school-based language and literacy services including service delivery options, and higher education pedagogy.
    Summary
    Students enter graduate programs primed for the idea that their performance needs to be perfect and without mistakes. This prohibits them from entering in a growth-based mindset, where they can be challenged, open to new ideas, and the power of learning from one’s mistakes. This session will cover the power of a growth-based mindset, and how it can positively prepare students to develop the essential communication and professional skills needed to succeed as a student transitioning into an independent professional.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe a fixed- vs. growth-based mindset .
  • Identify elements of professionalism and communication skills that are critical for students and practicing clinicians.
  • Demonstrate examples of how to build essential professionalism and communication skills in students.
  • Competency-based Metrics for Clinical Education (.15 CEUs)

    April 15 - Concurrent Sessions G (9:00-10:30 AM)

    Speakers
    • Stacy Kaplan, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Director, MS & SLPD programs; Clinical Associate Professor
      Stacy Kaplan (she/her) Ph.D., CCC-SLP, Clinical Associate Professor, is the director of the MS (SLP) and SLP-D programs at Northwestern University. The broad mission of her scholarship is to transform the field's approaches to education across the learning continuum via data-informed (1) pedagogical and curricular innovation and (2) approaches to faculty development as they relate to the development of CSD professionals.
    • Tom F. Muller, Au.D., CCC-A, (he/him/his) - Clinical Associate Professor and Coordinator of Clinical Education in Audiology
      Tom Muller, Au.D., CCCA a Clinical Associate Professor and the Coordinator of Clinical Education in Audiology for the University of Arizona, where he has been for almost 20 years. His clinical and research interests primarily include adults, hearing aids and cochlear implants. Dr. Muller serves on the Council for Clinical Certification as Vice Chair for Audiology (2019-2020) and Chair Elect (2021)
    Summary
    Current trends in professional health education are moving towards competency-based education for assessment of student learning outcomes instead of solely counting hours. This session will focus on methodologies for competency-based clinical education, both within and outside of CSD education. Participants will have the opportunity to exchange information regarding strategies for competency-based education that they have started to implement in their programs, along with challenges they are encountering.

    Learning Objectives
  • Identify the principles behind competency-based clinical education.
  • Describe specific methodologies used in competency-based clinical education.
  • Create an action plan for using competency-based education to sequentially, rather than simultaneously, assess each area of the curriculum.
  • Essential Functions Task Force: Document Revision and Update (.15 CEUs)

    April 15 - Concurrent Sessions G (9:00-10:30 AM)

    Speakers
    • Jean-Franco Rivera Perez, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor
      Jean-Franco Rivera-Pérez, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Texas Christian University. His academic interest and areas of expertise include the use of technology to promote vocabulary in bilingual (Spanish/English) preschool children with and without language disorder. Other areas of expertise include bilingual development, biliteracy, vocabulary intervention/instruction, assessment and treatment of bilingual (Spanish/English) preschool children, and social justice.
    • Jennifer Mackey, M.A., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Director of External Clinical Education
      Jennifer Mackey is an Assistant Professor and Director of Clinical Education at the MGH Institute of Health Professions. She has primary interests in clinical education and the support of graduate student clinicians. She specializes in early intervention and coordinates the early intervention concentration at the IHP. Jennifer currently serves as the Chair of the CAPCSD Essential Functions Task Force.
    • Jonette B. Owen, AuD, (she/her/hers) - Associate Dean Clinical Education
      Jonette B. Owen, Au.D, FNAP, CH-AP, is the Associate Dean for Clinical Education. Dr. Owen oversees clinical education at the Osborne College of Audiology - Salus University. She is President of the Pennsylvania Academy of Audiology. Dr. Owen was inducted as a Distinguished Practitioner and Fellow of the National Academies of Practice. In 2021 Dr. Owen was recognized as the Alumna of the Year for the Osborne College of Audiology.
    • Sujini Ramachandar, Ph.D., CCC_SLP, (she/her/hers) - Director of Clincial Education
      Sujini Ramachandar, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is the Director of Clinical Education at Southern Connecticut State University. Her applied research focuses on increasing the efficacy of clinical education. In addition, her interests include perceptions and cultural differences in the assessment and treatment of stuttering. She has over 20 years of experience working with children and adults who stutter, providing parent and family education, and collaborating with other disciplines.
    Summary
    The Essential Functions Task Force will present an overview of their work on the revision and update of the Essential Functions document. This work has included a survey, focus groups, and requests for expert input from stakeholders. Qualitative data from current findings will be presented, as well as guidelines for recommended use of the new document.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe the use of the Essential Functions document for use in academic programs in collaboration with students.
  • Identify the use of supports and accommodations for students in regard to the Essential Functions document.
  • Define the process for the current revision and creation of the new document, including stakeholder group participation.
  • Infusing the Principles of DEI into Clinical Practice (.15 CEUs)

    April 15 - Concurrent Sessions G (9:00-10:30 AM)

    Speakers
    • Shurita Thomas-Tate, Ph.D., (she/her/hers) - Associate Professor
      Shurita Thomas-Tate (Ph.D. SLP-CCC) is an associate professor of speech-language pathology at Missouri State University. She is the founder of Ujima Language and Literacy, which serves as a community resource and a clinical placement for SLP students to develop knowledge and skills in diversity, equity, and includsion. Shurtia has served on the Board of Education for Springfield Public Schools since 2020, and will be seeking re-election 2023.
    Summary
    Training students to be culturally aware and culturally responsive in their clinical work is essential to their success as future professionals. This session will discuss the need to ensure that clinical practice in both on and off-campus settings is culturally responsive. Specific ideas for teaching students how to infuse principles of DEI into their clinic materials and activities will be generated.

    Learning Objectives
  • State the importance of providing clinical services that are culturally responsive.
  • List factors to consider when selecting clinical materials and activities.
  • Discuss and share strategies that course participants have successfully used for integrating DEI into their clinical practice.
  • Practical Implementation Strategies for Achieving Program Inclusivity Goals (.15 CEUs)

    April 15 - Concurrent Sessions G (9:00-10:30 AM)

    Speakers
    • Carol G. Cokely, Ph.D., (she/her/hers) - Clinical Professor & AuD Program Head
      Carol Cokely, Ph.D., is clinical professor and AuD Program Head in the Department of SLH at the University of Texas at Dallas. She has a long-term commitment to andragogy of clinical and classroom education and program assessment. She is the current ACAE Vice President of the Board of Directors, a past member of the boards of the AAA and ARA and has served on numerous committees within AAA and CAPCSD.
    • Colleen G. LePrell, Ph.D., (she/her/hers) - Department Chair, Speech, Language & Hearing
      Dr. Colleen Le Prell is the Emilie and Phil Schepps Distinguished Professor of Hearing Science at the University of Texas at Dallas, Chair of the UTD Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing, and Head of the Ph.D. Program in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences. Current research programs in her laboratory include translational research programs directed at prevention of noise-induced hearing loss.
    • Scott K. Griffiths, Ph.D., (he/him/his) - Clinical Professor
      Scott Griffiths is Clinical Professor in the department of Speech, Language, and Hearing at the University of Texas at Dallas. Dr. Griffiths received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois and has served in various academic leadership roles over the past 30 years. He has been a frequent attendee/presenter at the annual CAPCSD meetings, and an advocate for the value of accreditation practices to effect program improvement.
    • Stephanie L, Fowler, AuD, Ph.D., (she/her/hers) - Clinical Asst Professor & Director of Clinical Education
      Stephanie L. Fowler, Ph.D., AuD, ABA-C is Director of AuD Clinical Education at The University of Texas at Dallas. She earned her bachelor's degree at Wichita State University and her AuD and Ph.D. at The University of Texas at Dallas. She is interested in the scholarship of teaching and learning in the clinical environment, simulated educational opportunities, and expanding interprofessional education and practice to drive adaptability in graduates.
    Summary
    Growing and robust evidence highlights the necessity to improve cultural competency and humility in healthcare education and delivery. Intentional efforts to improve cultural competency within these systems can serve to mitigate disparities for underrepresented groups across an array of ethnic, racial, and social domains.  Education programs in communication sciences and disorders must advance these competencies in both educational delivery and clinical care models.  Proficiency necessitates flexibility, continuous learning, expansion, and collaborative interactions, often with limited human and financial resources. Practical implementation of education, service delivery, and programmatic adjustments in recruitment, institutional partnerships, garnering resources, retention, and mentoring programs will be discussed.

    Learning Objectives
  • Identify university resources to enhance inclusivity for students.
  • Identify collaborations that advance your recruitment efforts for a diverse student body.
  • Identify practices that support retention of underrepresented students and faculty.
  • x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S17)

    April 15 - Concurrent Sessions G (9:00-10:30 AM)

    Location
    No Room

    Addressing the Needs of Students with Disabilities Within the Clinical Environment (.15 CEUs)

    April 15 - Concurrent Sessions H (11 AM-12:30 PM)

    Speakers
    • Lindsey Jorgensen, Au.D., Ph.D. - Associate Professor and Audiologist
      Lindsey Jorgensen is an Associate Professor at the University of South Dakota where she also serves as the Chair for the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders as well as the Clinic Director for the USD Speech and Hearing Clinics. She is also a clinical supervisor and has a research interest in the interaction between cognition and cognitive changes, hearing loss, and hearing assistive technology.
    Summary
    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requires programs to provide access to learning opportunities for students with disabilities. While many academic programs have established strategies for meeting the needs of these students within didactic courses, the same accommodations may not easily transition into clinical environments. This session will provide information regarding legal requirements for addressing accessibility for these students and provide strategies for meeting those needs.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe academic requirements related to the ADA regarding students with disabilities.
  • Discuss student responsibility regarding accommodations.
  • Discuss differences in clinical versus didactic accommodations for students with disabilities.
  • Developing and Leading an Effective Staff and Faculty Team in Academia (.15 CEUs)

    April 15 - Concurrent Sessions H (11 AM-12:30 PM)

    Speakers
    • Anne Marie Tharpe, Ph.D. CCC-A - Professor & Chair
      Dr. Anne Marie Tharpe is Professor and Chair, the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and School of Medicine. She became department chair in 2009. Her current role as chair includes oversight of a large clinical operation that provides >85,000 patient visits per year, a graduate program that confers four degrees, and a research program that expends approximately $8 million annually.
    Summary
    Building, retaining, and developing a cohesive, productive CSD staff and faculty team requires attentive leadership, short- and long-term planning, and effort. This session will provide strategies for recruiting and retaining a well-functioning and integrated CSD staff and faculty team in an academic setting. Time will also be spent by attendees in this session sharing methods for fostering team building and teamwork.

    Learning Objectives
  • List at least 2 strategies for developing effective short- and long-term faculty and staff recruitment plans.
  • List at least 2 strategies for building effective and cohesive teams within an academic program.
  • List at least 2 strategies for retention.
  • Distance Learning: successful Strategies from an Experienced Online Program (.15 CEUs)

    April 15 - Concurrent Sessions H (11 AM-12:30 PM)

    Speakers
    • Rachel M. Williams, Ph.D. , (she/her/hers) - Professor, Director of SLP.D. Program
      Rachel Williams, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, ASHA Fellow is a Professor, Director of the Doctor of Speech-Language Pathology (SLP.D.) program, and graduate supervisor at Nova Southeastern University. She teaches courses in technology and instrumentation in communication disorders, fluency disorders, multicultural and counseling issues, and professional issues. Her research areas of interest include fluency disorders, service delivery to culturally and linguistically diverse populations, diversity training in clinical education and leadership in higher education.
    Summary
    Distance learning programs can meet the needs of students who are unable to attend a traditional in-person learning program. There are, however, unique challenges in order for these programs to meet the educational needs of their students. This session will describe the experiences of a successful distance learning program, including how it provides clinical experiences and assesses its outcomes.

    Learning Objectives
  • Describe a successful CSD distance-learning educational model.
  • Identify strategies for successful implementation of a distance learning program.
  • Discuss potential barriers to student success within a distance learning program.
  • Everyone Asks, How Do You Manage a Master’s Program with 200 Students? (.1 CEUs)

    April 15 - Concurrent Sessions H (11 AM-12:30 PM)

    Speakers
    • Bob Stillman, Ph.D., (he/him/his) - Associate Dean of Graduate Studies
      Bob Stillman, Ph.D., Associate Dean for Graduate Programs, School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas.
    • Jessica Carter, M.S. CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Director of Clinical Education
      Jessica Carter, M.S. CCC-SLP, is the Director of Clinical Education for the Master of Science Program in Speech-Language Pathology at the University of Texas at Dallas. She teaches courses in preschool assessment & intervention, motor speech disorders, and bilingual articulation/phonology; and supervises graduate students in pediatric programs. Ms. Carter is active in the Texas Speech-Language Hearing Association and currently serves as the organization’s Vice President for Research and Development.
    • Michelle Aldridge, Ph.D. CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Program Head
      Michelle Aldridge, Ph.D., CCC-SLP serves as Program Head of the academic programs in Speech-Language Pathology at the University of Texas -Dallas. As a Professor of Instruction, Dr Aldridge teaches undergraduate and graduate coursework in Autism Spectrum Disorders, Articulation Disorders, and Motor Speech Disorders. She also supervises graduate students in a group clinical intervention program for toddlers with severe communication delays.
    Summary
    There continues to be a shortage of speech-language pathologists nationwide even as new graduate programs open and prepare clinicians to enter the field. When faced with the challenges of attempting to increase enrollment, many programs have chosen to solve this with online options. Our program developed a residential model to accommodate large numbers of students where we maintain the benefits of interpersonal contact, high levels of student/faculty connection and engagement, a wide network of clinical settings, and a diversity of clinical populations to support excellent student training. Strategies and ideas for creative clinical program growth will be explored.

    Learning Objectives
  • Identify strategies to creatively expand clinical programs for on-site student training while maintaining high levels of supervision and mentorship.
  • List strategies to build a network of community-based supervisors and future supervisors.
  • Describe potential challenges and solutions associated with expanding clinical programming.
  • Examining the Development and Evolution of Two Community-engaged Programs (.1 CEUs)

    April 15 - Concurrent Sessions H (11 AM-12:30 PM)

    Speakers
    • Caitlin V. Raaz, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, (she/her/hers) - Assistant Professor
      Caitlin Raaz, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an Assistant Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Northern Colorado. Her research interests include evidence-based treatment for children with severe speech sound disorders, genetic etiologies of communication disorders, and novel service delivery models for the treatment of speech and voice disorders.
    • Kimberly Murza, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Dean
      Kim Murza, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is the Associate Dean of Research and Faculty Affairs in the College of Natural and Health Sciences at the University of Northern Colorado (UNC). She previously served as a professor and graduate coordinator in the department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at UNC with expertise in language and school-based issues.She was also involved in the development and program coordination of three community engaged programs.
    • Nicole Reisfeld, SLPD, (she/her/hers) - Program Coordinator
      Nicole Reisfeld, SLPD, CCC-SLP is an Instructor and graduate Program Coordinator at the University of Northern Colorado. Areas of interest include graduate admissions processes, Community Engaged Learning, and support and supervision of graduate clinical experiences
    Summary
    Typical clinical experiences of first-year graduate students in SLP programs are limited to the university clinic. Additionally, first-year students rarely have the opportunity to coach parents who are seeking support to promote their children’s language and literacy development. We will describe our process of designing, implementing, and assessing two community-engaged programs, that were created to develop student’s coaching skills while positively impacting the community. Presenters will describe how mutual benefit was ensured and monitored, in addition to the overall development and implementation process and results. Unforeseen challenges and suggestions for future implementation and research will also be presented.

    Learning Objectives
  • Recognize steps used in the University of Northern Colorado program to design, implement and assess outcomes for community-engaged learning programs for first-year graduate SLP students.
  • Consider data regarding student efficacy in parent coaching from these projects to help determine value if this type of program was implemented in their programs.
  • Discuss additional unplanned benefits that resulted for our program, our students, and the community with the implementation of our community engaged programs.
  • x - Not Attending a Session During This Time Slot (S18)

    April 15 - Concurrent Sessions H (11 AM-12:30 PM)

    Location
    No Room
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