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2021 Virtual Annual Conference Sessions

Council of Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-language Pathology (CAA) Update (.15 CEUs)

4/8/2021 8:00 AM - 4/8/2021 9:30 AM ET

Speakers
  • Jaynee Handelsman, Ph.D., CCC-AUD - Chair of the CAA
    Jaynee A. Handelsman, Ph.D., CCC-A, is the 2021 Chair of the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA) and is an Audiology Practitioner Member of the Council.
  • Kimberlee Moore, MPP - Director of Accreditation
    Ms. Kimberlee Moore, MPP is the director of accreditation for the Council on Academic Accreditation (CAA)/American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). She provides strategic leadership, management oversight, and accreditation subject matter expertise to the accreditation program and serves as a non-voting ex-officio member of the CAA.
Summary
This session will focus on the current work of the Council of Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA) related to the implementation of the 2017 Standards, as well as updates to the Standards and accreditation processes. The most frequently cited standards in accreditation decisions and appropriate responses to citations will also be discussed.

Learning Objectives:
  • Describe updates to Standards and accreditation processes.
  • Discuss Standards interpretation and application.
  • Describe the appropriate program responses to citations in annual reports and reaccreditation reports.
  • Guidelines for Implementing Graduate Student Telepractice Training Programs (.15 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 8:00 AM - 4/8/2021 9:30 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Joneen Lowman, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Joneen Lowman, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Kentucky. She is Project Director for LinKS, a federal grant to train graduate CSD students in telehealth, and the Program Director for the interprofessional telehealth graduate certificate. Her teaching, research, and publications focus on the use of technology for treating childhood language disorders and telehealth.
    • Judy Walker, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor/Coordinator of the University of Maine, Speech Therapy Telepractice Training Program
      Judy Walker, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an Associate Professor and Coordinator of the University of Maine, Speech Therapy Telepractice Training Program in the University of Maine, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders. Her academic and research interests include speech therapy telepractice, neurolinguistics, and cognitive neuroscience. Dr. Walker established the telepractice program in 2012 which has become a model of best practices for telepractice training and service delivery both nationally and internationally.
    • K. Todd Houston, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVT - Professor
      K. Todd Houston, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVT, is a Professor, Speech-Language Pathologist (SLP), and a Listening and Spoken Language Specialist (LSLS) Certified Auditory-Verbal Therapist (Cert. AVT) on the faculty of the School of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology at the University of Akron (Akron, OH). He also serves as an SLP & LSLS Cert. AVT for the Cochlear Implant Program at Akron Children’s Hospital.
    Summary
    The COVID-19 pandemic accelerated the integration of telepractice training into graduate-level speech-language pathology programs. Educating CSD graduate students in telepractice is essential to uphold best clinical practices, tele-ethical responsibilities, and telehealth regulatory requirements in providing the highest quality telepractice services. Three well-established graduate student telepractice training programs will highlight best practices for preparing future clinicians to effectively and ethically deliver speech-language telepractice services and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic for future training.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Identify challenges in implementing telepractice training programs.
    • Describe the steps in creating different telepractice training models.
    • Describe telepractice clinical competencies.

    Lessons Learned from Teaching During a Pandemic: Improved Pedagogy from Remote Teaching (.15 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 8:00 AM - 4/8/2021 9:30 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Jennifer C. Friberg, Ed.D. - Interim Chair
      Dr. Jennifer Friberg serves as Interim Director for the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Technology, Cross Endowed Chair in SoTL, and Professor of Communication Sciences & Disorders at Illinois State University. She is the founding Associate Editor for Teaching and Learning in Communication Sciences & Disorders and is the co-editor of Case Studies in Evidence-Based Education: A Resource for Teaching in Clinical Professions.
    • Jim Gee, M.S. - Coordinator
      After spending 15 years in broadcast journalism and journalism education, Jim Gee now serves as Communication coordinator for the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Technology at Illinois State. This includes facilitating workshops and consultations for faculty, in addition to doing outreach to Illinois State University faculty and staff about the Center's many services. He hosts CTLT's podcast, Let's Talk Teaching. He still teaches most semesters in the School of Communication.
    • Nancy L. Chick, Ph.D. - Director
      Nancy Chick (Ph.D., English) is Director of the Endeavor Foundation Center for Faculty Development at Rollins College (Florida, USA) and Co-President of the International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (ISSOTL). She is editor of SoTL in Action (2018), co-editor of SoTL as Public Scholarship (2021), co-editor of two Exploring Signature Pedagogies books (2009, 2012), and founding co-editor of Teaching & Learning Inquiry, the journal of ISSOTL.
    Summary
    Teaching during a pandemic has created challenges but has influenced our teaching practices, as well. Many of the lessons we have learned as a result of COVID-19 will continue to positively influence our academic practices for the years to come. This session will feature an interview of two scholars of teaching and learning who will share their perspectives on post-pandemic pedagogy and discuss ways in which our collective experiences as teachers in 2020 might be viewed as opportunities for continued growth and improvement in course design and implementation.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Discuss the challenges faced transitioning to remote teaching
    • Identify three positive impacts learned in the transition.
    • Describe ways in which each positive impact can be extended beyond COVID to improve teaching and learning in CSD.

    Building an Academic Community That Is Diverse, Accomplished, and Collegial (.15 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 8:00 AM - 4/8/2021 9:30 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Celeste Domsch Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Professor/Regents Teacher
      Dr. Celeste Domsch is a Professor in the Department of Communication Disorders at Texas State University. She was named a Regents' Teacher of the Texas State University System in 2020. She also serves as the Graduate Program Director and Graduate Advisor. Dr. Domsch has co-directed Study Abroad opportunities in the United Kingdom and Peru. Her areas of research interest include child language disorders and the development of cultural competence.
    • Valarie B. Fleming, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Professor/Chair
      Valarie B. Fleming, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is Professor and Chair in the Department of Communication Disorders at Texas State University where she teaches courses in adult neurogenics and swallowing disorders. Her passion for the profession and teaching, as well as her interests in the access and utilization of healthcare services by underrepresented populations, spurred her to assist faculty in developing inclusive classroom practices and preparing culturally competent clinicians.
    Summary
    Retaining a diverse population of students begins prior to students being admitted. The Department of Communication Disorders at Texas State University has graduated majority-minority graduate cohorts and currently has an undergraduate program that is majority-minority. This session will present lessons learned and strategies programs can use to support the success of all students from admittance to graduation and beyond.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Discuss ways to recruit and retain talented faculty.
    • Identify ways to diversify the applicant pool for graduate programs.
    • Describe ways to mentor undergraduate students through the pipeline to graduate school.
    • Connect the importance of engaging alumni with retention and success of current students.

    How Policies and Procedures Can Create Inclusivity in CSD (.15 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 8:00 AM - 4/8/2021 9:30 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Kia Johnson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Kia Noelle Johnson, Ph.D.,CCC-SLP, is an Associate Professor at the University of Houston (TX) in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders. She specializes in Fluency and Fluency Disorders with focus on childhood stuttering. Her research interest is in the examination of speech disfluencies in culturally/linguistically diverse children. She serves on the ASHA Board of Directors, is the National Advisor to National NSSLHA, and chairs the NBASLH Board of Directors.
    Summary
    Many program policies and procedures were developed by and for students, faculty, and staff of mainstream US culture. These policies and procedures have the unintended consequence of creating exclusivity in CSD programs and perpetuate marginalization of culturally diverse groups within these programs. This session will provide the opportunity to more closely examine how this happens and propose solutions to create more inclusive policies and procedures.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe the importance of evaluating policies and procedures of CSD programs from a diversity, equity, and inclusion perspective.
    • Identify potential barriers to diversity, equity, and inclusion found in policies and procedures of CSD programs.
    • Develop an action plan to strategically review, evaluate, and modify policies and procedures within your program.

    Solving the Supervisory Bottleneck: 2:1 Supervision (.15 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 8:00 AM - 4/8/2021 9:30 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Jill Bates, M.S., CCC-SLP - Clinic Director
      Jill Bates, M.S, CCC-SLP, is the Clinic Director for Calvin University's Speech Pathology and Audiology Department. She developed Calvin's on-campus speech and hearing clinic and also collaboratively developed the new interprofessional rehabilitation clinic. Calvin University continues to run the donation-based On Campus Clinic to serve pediatric and adult clients. Spectrum Health has partnered with Calvin Rehabilitation Services and formed Karen Duffy Jennifer Dennis Linsey Jones
    • Joy McKenzie, Ed.D., CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor/Clinic Director
      Joy McKenzie, EdD, CCC-SLP, is an Assistant Professor and Clinical Director in the Communication Sciences and Disorders program at St. Cloud State University. She received her M.S. in Speech-Language Pathology at Minnesota State University Moorhead in 2004 and her EdD in Higher Education Administration at SCSU in 2020. She enjoys learning about personal and professional development including supervision practices to bridge courses to clinic and academia to workforce settings.
    Summary
    The two-hour CEU supervision requirement has highlighted challenges in recruiting and supporting clinical educators. Graduate programs rely on clinical educators to help prepare future speech-language pathologists and audiologists. This session will explore barriers that programs are facing in identifying and supporting clinical educators. Clinical supervision, as a culture, is embedded within the Communication Sciences and Disorders professions, which impacts current clinical educator preparedness efforts. In order to have effective change initiatives, considering the needs of the clinical educator to be effective must occur. Current research and exploration of resources are available to help programs provide support to clinical educators.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe the challenges in finding clinical educators.
    • Identify strategies for recruiting new extern clinical educators.
    • List innovative ways to assist clinical educators in meeting supervision competencies.

    ** Not Attending a Session During this Time Slot

    4/8/2021 8:00 AM - 4/8/2021 9:30 AM ET

    Community Conversations: Sharing a Model (.1 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 10:00 AM - 4/8/2021 11:00 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Brenda Mitchell - Associate Chair for Student Services
      Brenda O. Everett Mitchell is the Associate Chair for Student Services and AHEC Operations in the Department of Allied Health Sciences at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has maintained a faculty appointment in the Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences since 1996 and has taught at undergraduate and graduate levels in Speech-Language Pathology. Mitchell is diversity liaison for the dept. and passionate about mentoring students.
    Summary
    Creating a diverse and inclusive environment in our academic training program is essential. This session will discuss a successful program for facilitating conversations with the goal of intentionally and mindfully respecting diversity and increasing inclusion in our academic communities.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe the components necessary to create a program engaging faculty, staff and students in discussions around diversity, equity, and inclusion.
    • Outline critical elements for creating a safe space for these critical conversations.
    • Define two action items for implementing a similar program in your academic program.

    Distance Education: Trends, Realities and Perceptions About Distance Learning in CSD Programs (.1 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 10:00 AM - 4/8/2021 11:00 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Crystal Murphree-Holden, M.A., CCC-SLP - Director of Distance Education
      Crystal Murphree-Holden, M.A., CCC-SLP, is Director of Distance Education in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of South Carolina. She is Vice President on Higher Education for the SC Speech-Language-Hearing Association and chair of CAPCSD Distance Education Committee. As a distance learning administrator, clinical educator, and IPP/IPE course facilitator, she has 35+ years of clinical and professional practice experience in a variety of settings.
    Summary
    To better support member programs already offering a distance-learning component, a survey was completed by CAPCSD members to assess understanding about distance education in CSD programs. Areas assessed include 1) federal regulation and compliance regarding distance education; strategies for supporting distance learning students; 3) clinical education/experiential learning; 4) academic integrity, and 5) perceptions and mis-perceptions about distance education/distance learning in CSD. Results of the survey will be provided.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Discuss the importance of NC-SARA in distance education and experiential learning in programs that lead to professional licensure.
    • Identify at least two strategies for supporting distance learning students.
    • After attending this session, participants will be able to identify two challenges with clinical placements.

    Interviewing Processes for Facilitating Holistic Admissions in Graduate Programs (.1 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 10:00 AM - 4/8/2021 11:00 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Christine Carmichael Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Professor/Graduate Program Coordinator
      Christine Carmichael, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is professor and graduate program coordinator for the Woolfolk School of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Our Lady of the Lake University. She also serves on the CSDCAS Advisory Committee through CAPCSD and chairs the CSDCAS Resource Subcommittee. Her clinical, teaching and research interests focus on voice and swallowing disorders.
    • Douglas F. Parham, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Chair/Program Director
      Douglas F. Parham, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is the Chair and Program Director of the Department of CSD at Wichita State University. He is the Kansas representative on ASHA's Speech-Language Pathology Advisory Council and a Site Visitor for ASHA's Council on Academic Accreditation. He is a member of CAPCSD's CSDCAS Committee. He is a Past President of the Kansas Speech-Language-Hearing Association and the Council of State Speech-Language-Hearing Association Presidents.
    • Kerry C. Mandulak, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor/Chair of Graduate Admissions
      As Chair of Graduate Admissions in the Pacific University School of Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD), Kerry Callahan Mandulak, Associate Professor, has seen firsthand the power of using holistic review processes to increase the diversity of the speech-language pathology and audiology workforce. She has served as a member and past Chair of the CSDCAS Committee. Through her research and speaking opportunities, Dr. Mandulak continues the national conversation around this important work.
    Summary
    CSD graduate programs face difficult decisions regarding whom to admit, with many qualified applicants competing for a limited number of spaces. Admissions processes are different across graduate programs, but many do not include an interview as part of their review. Programs wonder about the added benefits of interviewing on the selection process; however, some applicants are not who they appear to be on paper. This session will introduce the holistic review process and the role of interviews. We will review the benefits of--and deterrents to--interviews, and provide insight regarding applicant feedback, time and effort, and outcomes for programs.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe at least two processes to conduct interviews for graduate admissions at their institution.
    • Compare and contrast benefits and deterrents of using interviews for graduate admissions.
    • Identify evidence to support the rationale for conducting interviews for graduate admissions.

    Lessons Learned from Teaching During a Pandemic: Improving Our Teaching with Technology (.1 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 10:00 AM - 4/8/2021 11:00 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Hannah Siburt, Au.D., Ph.D. - Assistant Professor
      Hannah Siburt, Au.D., Ph.D., is a Clinical Assistant Professor and the AuD Program Coordinator at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is a graduate of Radford University and the University of Florida. Her research and clinical interests include audiologic (re)habilitation across the lifespan, listening effort, and clinical education. She is a licensed audiologist in the state of North Carolina.
    Summary
    Teaching during a pandemic has created different challenges but influenced our teaching practices. This session will address effective technologies that enhance learning in both a remote and in-person classroom.

    Learning Objectives:
    • State two challenges in transitioning to remote teaching.
    • Identify two technologies used for remote teaching.
    • Describe these technologies for future use in our academic program.

    Praxis (.1 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 10:00 AM - 4/8/2021 11:00 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Nick Bellack - Client Relations Director
      Nicholas A. Bellack, Client Relations Director, Professional Licensure and Certification, Educational Testing Service (ETS), is responsible for providing support for professional licensure and certification stakeholders around the country. Before joining ETS, Bellack held the assistant and director position for the Wyoming Professional Teaching Standards Board, was an early learning consultant for the State of Wyoming, and was an elementary school teacher. He holds a bachelors and a master's degree in education.
    Summary
    This presentation will provide a Praxis program update specific to the SLP and Audiology tests and orient participants to ETS resources for institutions and students. The focus of the session will be on Data Manager and its ability to be utilized to gather data in order to make programmatic appraisals/decisions and assist individual students.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Highlighting ETS Data Manager and how the data queried from it can be used for program appraisal/improvement.
    • Understanding resources related to ETS/Praxis to better assist students.
    • Reviewing test data to orient participants to the national picture of testing.

    CARE in Distance: Assessing Clinical Empathy of Novice Clinicians Engaged in Telepractice (.1 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 10:00 AM - 4/8/2021 11:00 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Bridget Sweet, Ph.D. - Associate Professor of Music Education
      Bridget Sweet is Associate Professor of Music Education at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign, Illinois. She teaches music education pedagogy, choral methods, middle-level general music methods, graduate courses in music education, and a course focused on the development of healthy music practices. She wrote the books Growing Musicians: Teaching Music in Middle School and Beyond (2016) and Thinking Outside the Voice Box: Adolescent Voice Change in Music Education (2019).
    • Clarion Mendes, M.A., CCC-SLP - Clinical Assistant Professor
      Clarion Mendes, M.A., CCC-SLP/L, is a speech-language pathologist (SLP) and clinical assistant professor at the University of Illinois. She is a specialist working on behalf of the trans and gender minority community. She is a member of the World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH) and a certified member of OutCare Health. Clarion has given invited talks about providing culturally humble care to universities and organizations across the Midwest.
    • Keiko Ishikawa, M.M. - Assistance Professor
      Keiko Ishikawa, M.M., Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an assistant professor in the Department of Speech and Hearing Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research focuses on understanding how dysphonia affects speech intelligibility in everyday communication environments.
    • Sarah Wigley, M.M. - Clinical Assistant Professor/Contemporary Voice Specialist
      Sarah Wigley is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Voice for the Lyric Theatre department at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where she instructs Lyric Theatre Studio, Musical Theatre Repertoire, and Singing in Musical Theatre while stage directing opera and musical theatre. Wigley has presented at the International Congress of Voice Teachers, the National Association for Teachers of Singing, Iowa Choral Directors Association, and Illinois and Minnesota Music Education Associations.
    • Yvonne Redman, B.M. - Associate Professor
      Yvonne Gonzales Redman, Associate Professor of Voice, soprano and teacher of voice and pedagogy at University of Illinois. She has recently published "Work-Related Communicative Profile of Voice Teachers" in Journal of Voice and has presented at the International Conference of Voice Teachers, The Voice Foundation, Regional and National conferences of the National Association of Teachers of Singing, and Florida and Texas Music Education Associations.
    Summary
    Clinical empathy is critical for formation of a clinician-patient therapeutic alliance (Ardito & Rabellino, 2011); however, displaying empathy in the telepractice environment may be difficult for student clinicians. An academic and clinical faculty dyad will discuss a four-part, interprofessional approach to telepractice training for first-semester SLP graduate students. Special emphasis was placed on telepractice etiquette and clinical empathy. Through a collaboration with music/theater faculty and students, SLP students underwent 1) didactic training, 2) peer-practice, 3) standardized patient assessment, and 4) real patient assessment. The students’ clinical empathy was assessed using the CARE measure (Mercer et al., 2004).

    Learning Objectives:
    • Incorporate measures of clinical empathy into graduate clinical training.
    • Generate novel ideas for academic/clinical partnerships.
    • Establish the foundation for incorporating standardized patients into telepractice delivery.

    Pragmatic Humanism in CSD: Engaging Rural, White Students in Diversity Education (.1 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 10:00 AM - 4/8/2021 11:00 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Ana Honnacker, Dr. Phil. - Lecturer
      Dr. Ana Honnacker teaches philosophy at the University of Hildesheim, Germany. Her main research areas are environmental philosophy, political philosophy and philosophy of religion. She graduated in philosophy, theology and linguistics in 2008 (University of Münster, Germany) and has been research assistant at the Technical University of Darmstadt as well as assistant professor at the Institute for Philosophical Research Hannover. She is co-founder of the German Pragmatism Network.
    • Christopher Townsend, Ph.D. - Assistant Professor
      Christopher Townsend, Ph.D., LPC, CCS, NCC, is an Assistant Professor at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center in the Department of Clinical Counseling and Mental Health. Dr. Townsend has trained both domestically and internationally on various mental health topics. He currently serves as the Director of his departments mental health clinic and serves as the university faculty co-chair of the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion committee.
    • Tobias Kroll, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Tobias A. Kroll, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an Associate Professor at the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center in Lubbock, TX. Dr. Kroll received his M.A. in Linguistics from the University of Münster (Germany) and his PhD and clinical education in CSD from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. His education has included forays into anthropology and philosophy, and his passion is to bring relevant liberal arts concepts to our field.
    Summary
    In this reflection on scholarly teaching, we will outline the difficulties arising from critical theory, the current default framework in CSD diversity education, and offer an alternative framework, pragmatic humanism. We will argue that the latter can reap the benefits of critical theory without adopting its claims to interpretive exclusivity. The argument will be illustrated using concrete examples from first author’s teaching experience. We will conclude that pragmatic humanism is useful especially for diversity teachers in CSD who are faced with an overwhelmingly White, rural student body that may be reluctant to accept the realities of racism.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe the differences between critical theory and pragmatic humanism, and their common grounding in meliorism.
    • Outline the pitfalls of using a critical theory framework when teaching an overwhelmingly White, rural student body.
    • Use three concrete strategies to couch CSD diversity education in a pragmatic humanist framework that takes White, rural students’ culture into account.

    ** Not Attending a Session During this Time Slot

    4/8/2021 10:00 AM - 4/8/2021 11:00 AM ET

    POSTER - Connecting SLP Graduate Students to Their Future; Telepractice Pedagogy in the Classroom (.05 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 12:30 PM - 4/8/2021 1:00 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Laura Lenkey Ph.D. - Assistant Professor
      Laura E. Lenkey, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor at Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, MI. She holds a Doctorate of Philosophy in Human Sciences from Florida State University and has over 36 years of combined experience as a speech-language pathologist in hospitals, private practice, and academic settings. Interests are in preparing graduate students to meet the technological frontiers emerging in our global environments.
    Summary
    Requirements and competencies in training and implementation of telepractice are now essential. “How are we preparing graduate students to provide telepractice?” This paper introduces graduate student’s perspectives of telepractice training as a pedagogical tool within the classroom. Qualitative data addressing the phenomenology of graduate student perceptions of tele-practice inclusion during weekly classroom lecture was collected. Three major perceptual themes were identified: 1.) Contributes to impact learning, 2.) Enhances professional development 3.) Improves employability. Findings suggest telepractice as a graduate-level pedagogical tool has merit in academic training for therapeutic implementation, satisfaction with learning platform, and professional application.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Gain an understanding of the exploratory nature of Telepractice use as a pedagogical tool in training programs.
    • Identify baseline perceptions necessary to effectively enhance use of Telepractice as entry level clinicians.
    • Recognize the potential impact on employability.

    POSTER - Graduate Student Clinicians’ Preparedness and Experiences Providing Clinical Services During COVID-19 (.05 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 12:30 PM - 4/8/2021 1:00 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Laura Moody - Clinic Coordinator
      Laura Moody is the Clinic Coordinator at the University of Nebraska Kearney (UNK). She has been a Lecturer and Clinical Educator at UNK for nine years. Her interests are in the areas of supervision and training graduate students, including telepractice speech-language services
    • Whitney Schneider-Cline - Associate Professor/Graduate Program Chair
    Summary
    Graduate student clinicians in one residential SLP graduate program completed pre- and post-surveys in the summer and fall of 2020 semesters to capture their COVID-19 clinical experiences. Results include 37 students’ self-evaluation of their preparedness and experiences in providing telepractice and in-person services during these challenging times across disorder areas. This data represents students who: had previous in-person clinical experiences to conduct telepractice (12); had previous telepractice experience (6); and had no previous clinical experience (19). Preliminary findings indicated the training procedures in place prior to COVID-19 were effective during the pandemic.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Explain graduate student clinicians’ preparedness related to providing telepractice versus in-person treatment during the COVID-19 global pandemic.
    • Describe graduate student clinicians' perceived experiences related to providing telepractice and in-person treatment during the COVID-19 global pandemic.
    • Compare findings from this study to their own program in regard to preparing graduate SLP student clinicians.

    POSTER - Student Satisfaction Differences Between Live and Virtual Simulation Experiences in Interprofessional Education (.05 CEU)

    4/8/2021 12:30 PM - 4/8/2021 1:00 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Erin Clark, M.S., CCC-SLP - Clinic Director
      Erin Clark, M.S., CCC-SLP, is the Clinic Director for the IUP Speech, Language, and Hearing Clinic. She is a member of a collaborative faculty group who received a $25,000 grant to develop research infrastructure in interprofessional healthcare simulations. She is the instructor of a clinical practicum in acute care simulation.
    • Johanna Boothby, Ph.D. - Assistant Professor
      Pao Ying Hsaio is a registered dietitian and an associate professor in the Department of Food and Nutrition at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. She is the chair of a collaborative faculty group who received a $25,000 grant to develop research infrastructure in interprofessional healthcare simulations.
    • Lori Lombard Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Graduate Coordinator
      Lori Lombard is the graduate coordinator of the Speech, Language Pathology Program at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. She is a member of a collaborative faculty group who coordinate interprofessional healthcare simulations.
    • Nicole Clark, DCN, RDN, LDN, CDCES - Associate Professor
      Pao Ying Hsaio is a registered dietitian and an associate professor in the Department of Food and Nutrition at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. She is the chair of a collaborative faculty group who received a $25,000 grant to develop research infrastructure in interprofessional healthcare simulations.
    • Pao Ying Hsiao, Ph.D., RDN - Registered Dietitian
      Pao Ying Hsaio is a registered dietitian and an associate professor in the Department of Food and Nutrition at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. She is the chair of a collaborative faculty group who received a $25,000 grant to develop research infrastructure in interprofessional healthcare simulations.
    • Rachel DeSoto-Jackson - Assistant Professor
      Pao Ying Hsaio is a registered dietitian and an associate professor in the Department of Food and Nutrition at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. She is the chair of a collaborative faculty group who received a $25,000 grant to develop research infrastructure in interprofessional healthcare simulations.
    Summary
    Interprofessional education delivered with live simulations can highlight critical knowledge and skills in cooperative clinical care. COVID-19 restrictions led to faculty innovation to create virtual simulated learning environments. This study will compare results of the Satisfaction of Simulation Experience Scale (Levett-Jones, et al, 2011) from a live simulation during Fall 2019 to a virtual simulation of the near identical scenario conducted Fall 2020 with students from Nursing, Nutrition, Theater, and Speech. Student satisfaction has been linked to engagement in learning and even performance (Prion, 2008; Brenner, 2006). Results will be presented with implications for the construct of IPE virtual simulations.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Understand adaptations from live to virtual simulations.
    • Identify simulation experiences that impact student satisfaction.
    • Apply technical and scenario considerations for virtual IPE simulations.

    POSTER - Supporting a Culturally and Linguistically Diverse CSD Student Community at Hofstra University (.05 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 12:30 PM - 4/8/2021 1:00 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Ashley McDonough - Undergraduate Student
      Ashley McDonough is a senior undergraduate student in the speech-language-hearing sciences department with minors in both linguistics and cognitive science. She is a member of the Sigma Pi speech-language-hearing sciences honors society, as well as a member of the Hofstra Honor’s College. In addition, she is the treasurer of the National Student Speech-Language Hearing Association and member of the student advocacy group promoting diversity and multiculturalism.
    • Erin Kim - Undergraduate Student
      Erin Kim is a sophomore in the speech-language-hearing sciences department at Hofstra University. She is the fundraising chair for the National Student Speech-Language-Hearing Association and is on the advocacy group working on diversity and multiculturalism.
    • Gabriella Polito - Undergraduate Student
      Ms. Gabriella Polito is a junior at Hofstra majoring in speech-language-hearing sciences and minoring in psychology. She is a member of National Student Speech-Language Hearing Association and a member of the advocacy group working on diversity and multiculturalism. She is a tour guide at Hofstra and informs prospective students about the opportunities the university has to offer.
    • Julie Grzybowski - Undergraduate Student
      Julie Grzybowski is a senior undergraduate student in the speech-language-hearing sciences department with a minor in psychology. She is a member of Sigma Pi speech language hearing sciences honor society. In addition, she is the volunteer chair for the National Student Speech-Language Hearing Association (NSSLHA) and a member of the advocacy group promoting diversity and multiculturalism.
    • Mason Pflender - Undergraduate Student
      Mason Pfender is a junior in the speech-language-hearing sciences department and is interested in audiology. He is an active member of the National Student Speech-Language Hearing Association (NSSLHA) and a member of our advocacy group promoting diversity and multicultural work.
    • Susan DeMetropolis, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor
      Susan M. DeMetropolis, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an assistant professor in the department of speech-language-hearing sciences at Hofstra University. She is the chapter advisor for the National Student Speech-Language Hearing Association (NSSLHA) and the mentor of the advocacy group. The advocacy group promoted diversity and multiculturalism in the fall 2020 semester and will be continuing the work to other universities, colleges, and clinical settings.
    Summary
    The National Student Speech-Language Hearing Association (NSSLHA) at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York created an advocacy group for the academic year. These five undergraduate students/authors on this presentation formed a diversity task-force due to the current situation of racial inequalities. Our NSSLHA chapter hosted a workshop on November 11, 2020 with two speech-language pathologists and two audiologists whom are people of color discussing various diversity topics related to multiculturalism and cultural competencies in CSD education. The students created a questionnaire to provide to participants before the workshop and post-workshop to assess knowledge and experiences.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Demonstrate knowledge of multiculturalism and cultural competencies in CSD education.
    • List racial inequalities in CSD education and clinical settings.
    • Define future directions in CSD education and clinical settings to address multiculturalism and cultural competencies.

    POSTER - Survey Responses Assessing Telehealth Perceptions in Graduate Students, Faculty, Clients, and Family (.05 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 12:30 PM - 4/8/2021 1:00 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Christina M. Riseman, M.A. CCC-SLP - Clinical Faculty
      Christina Riseman, M.A. CCC-SLP, is a clinical faculty member at the University of Colorado, Boulder. She currently instructs students within the CU Boulder Speech, Language, and Hearing Clinic who work with adult individuals with acquired cognitive-linguistic disorders. Christina has prior experience in both acute care and outpatient settings. She has a deep desire to participate in clinical research to improve upon and further integrate evidence-based practice in our field.
    • Holly Kleiber, M.S., CCC-SLP - Clinical Faculty
      Holly Kleiber, M.S., CCC-SLP, is a clinical faculty member at the University of Colorado Boulder who specializes in the area of acquired adult neurogenic cognitive-linguistic disorders. She supervises students in the assessment and treatment of adults with swallowing, language, motor speech, and cognitive impairments. Holly served on the board of directors for the Colorado Speech-Language-Hearing Association (CSHA) and is a member of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) S.T.E.P. Mentoring Program.
    • Julie Breidenstein - Clinic Assistant to Operations
      Julie Breidenstein, B.S., is the Clinic Assistant to Operations at the Speech, Language and Hearing Clinic at the University of Colorado Boulder. She schedules clients from the community to receive speech therapy services from graduate students as they gain clinical hours. Julie manages the billing, maintains HIPAA standards, processes medical records, and tracks clinical inventory. She supports daily operations and provides administrative support to clinical faculty, graduate students, and clients.
    • Shelley Sheppeck, M.A. - Director of Clinical Operations
      Shelley Sheppeck, Director of Clinic Operations at CU Boulder's Speech, Language and Hearing Clinic (SLHC) since 2015, has taken SLHC from paper files to an electronic health record system, ready for insurance claims filing immediately. She has an M.A., International Economics and an M.S., Molecular Biology, showing her commitment to higher education. Her experience includes 11 years at CUB, with extensive economics and business background.
    Summary
    This study aimed to investigate the perceptions of telepractice services for graduate student clinicians, clinical faculty, clients, and family members following the abrupt shift to remote learning and clinic due to the global pandemic. Weekly surveys were sent to each group from the onset of the provision of telepractice services to the end of the spring 2020 semester. Results are considered for within group changes across the semester to assess trends over time, as well as between groups to determine if there were differing perceptions. Lastly, possible factors that contributed to those perceptions are considered.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Compare survey responses investigating opinions about telepractice for each group from immediately following the switch to remote learning and clinic to the end of the spring 2020 semester.
    • Discuss how survey responses were similar and different among the groups of respondents.
    • Discuss possible factors that may have contributed to how each group rated their impression of services provided via telepractice.

    POSTER - Using a Virtual Evaluation Study to Provide Clinical Experiences to Graduate Students (.05 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 12:30 PM - 4/8/2021 1:00 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Cara Singer, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor
      Cara M. Singer, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Grand Valley State University. Her primary research interest relates to childhood stuttering, with a focus on improving prognostic assessments and social-emotional outcomes in children who stutter.
    • Courtney Martin - Undergraduate Student
      Courtney L. Martin is a senior at Grand Valley State University's College of Health Professions where she is pursuing a bachelor's degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders. Upon completion of her bachelor's degree, Courtney will pursue a master's degree in Speech-Language Pathology. Her primary research interest is related to stuttering.
    Summary
    This presentation will detail a research study that was developed to provide face-to-face virtual clinical experiences for graduate speech-language pathology students when off-campus clinical experiences were suspended and an on-site clinic was not available. Students provided virtual fluency evaluations for adults who stutter. Both the adults who stutter and students were considered to be participants, so extensive student training to obtain research reliability was not a prerequisite. Procedures will be described and pre- and post-experience student feedback will be reported. Similar methods could be used by other programs to provide students with valuable clinical experiences with select populations.

    Learning Objectives:
    • List benefits of using research to provide clinical experiences for graduate students.
    • Discuss characteristics of studies that provide meaningful, clinical experiences for students.
    • Identify populations of interest that your program may want to target in a similar study.

    ** Not Attending a Session During this Time Slot

    4/8/2021 12:30 PM - 4/8/2021 1:00 PM ET

    POSTER - Analysis of the Au.D. Externship Application Process (.05 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 1:00 PM - 4/8/2021 1:30 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Trent Westrick, Au.D. - Associate Professor
      Trent Westrick, Au.D., is an Associate Professor and Externship Coordinator in the School of Audiology at Pacific University in Oregon. He teaches amplification, cerumen management, ototoxicity, and audiology skills labs courses, in addition to providing clinical supervision to first- and second-year Au.D. students.
    Summary
    Graduate students applying for final-year Au.D. externships are faced with a variety of challenges. This poster will provide an overview of the externship application experience from the perspective of students and the Externship Coordinator from the School of Audiology at Pacific University. Data collected from various stages of the application process will be presented, including the number of applications submitted, differences in application requirements, and variances in the application timeline. The primary purpose of this poster is to provide compelling evidence for a standardized and centralized Au.D. externship application process.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Identify challenges faced by students and Au.D. program faculty in securing externship positions
    • Summarize general data pertaining to the Au.D. externship application process in a large-cohort AuD program.
    • Summarize reasons why a standardized and centralized Au.D. externship application process would be beneficial for all invested parties.

    POSTER - Characteristics of Good Audiologists - Are We Biased? (.05 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 1:00 PM - 4/8/2021 1:30 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Brandie Mack - Graduate Research Assistant
      Brandie Mack earned a bachelor’s degree in communicative disorders and sciences from San Jose State University and is now a graduate research assistant pursuing a doctorate in audiology at Gallaudet University.
    • Chizuko Tamaki, Au.D., Ph.D. - Professor / Au.D. Program Director
    • Sarah Sparks, Au.D. - Clinical Audiologist
      Sarah Sparks, Au.D., CCC-A, is a clinical audiologist and PhD student at Gallaudet University. Her interests include pediatrics, vestibular assessment and management, aural rehabilitation, and audiology services within signing Deaf communities.
    Summary
    Professional accreditation and certification agencies detail the professional competencies and minimum qualifications to enter the practice of audiology, but it is the values of audiologists that directly or indirectly influence who among the professionals advance in the professional communities. A survey of audiologists exploring the various qualities that make audiologists excel also solicited the demographic information about up to two specific audiologists whom each respondent admires. Congruity between the respondents’ demographics and the demographics of those admired by the respondents will be reported, with focus on race/ethnicity, gender identity, age, and disability status.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Articulate the impacts of peer perceptions and values on audiologists being promoted in the professional communities.
    • Describe the demographic and other characteristics of audiologists who are admired by their colleagues.
    • Suggest ways for our professional community to promote audiologists from diverse backgrounds.

    POSTER - Essential Functions in CSD: Content and Implementation Analysis (.05 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 1:00 PM - 4/8/2021 1:30 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Pamela Hart, Ph.D. CCC-SLP - Department Chair and Professor
      Pam Hart, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is Department Chair and Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Rockhurst University. Dr. Hart has worked in higher education since completing her Ph.D. in 2003. She teaches courses in her primary interest areas of AAC and child language and conducts research in a variety of AAC, SOTL, and child language related areas.
    • Shatonda S. Jones, CCC-SLP - Associate Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders & Faculty Senate Chair-Elect
      Shatonda S. Jones, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, CBIST, is an Associate Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) at Rockhurst University. Her research centers on health capacity building in communities of color, SOTL, diffusion of health information, edutainment, and CLD issues in CSD. She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in adult neurogenics. She has more than a decade of clinical experience working primarily with adults with neurogenic communication and swallowing disorders.
    Summary
    The Essential Functions (EFs) were developed as a way to reinforce the requisite cognitive, social-emotional, physical, and behavioral skills necessary to become a competent speech-language pathologist or audiologist. The purpose of this study was to explore the varied ways programs describe and implement EFs in graduate student admissions and retention policies. Fifty graduate level CSD programs were randomly selected and a content analysis across EF policies and procedures was completed. Themes across programs will be presented. Implications and possible unintended consequences of EFs will be discussed.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe the scope and intended purpose of Essential Functions in CSD.
    • Compare and contrast the different ways CSD programs describe and implement Essential Functions.
    • Discuss possible implications of Essential Functions as related to diversity in CSD.

    POSTER - Making Technology Your Supervision Superpower (.05 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 1:00 PM - 4/8/2021 1:30 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Jennifer N. Gaylord, CScD, CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor
      Dr. J. Nikki Gaylord, CCC-SLP is an assistant professor at Murray State University in the Center for Communication Disorders and has been a practicing speech-language pathologist for over 20 years. She completed her doctorate of clinical science in speech-language pathology in 2019 and is currently working toward completion of a doctorate of education. Her current research interests include exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction in athletes, exercise-induced dyspnea, and ethics in speech-language pathology.
    • Stephanie M. Schaaf, Ed.D., CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor/Clinic Director
      Stephanie Schaaf, Ed.D., CCC-SLP, is clinic director and an assistant professor at Murray State University. In addition to supervising graduate students, she enjoys teaching graduate courses relating to speech sound disorders, professional issues, AAC and counseling. Before transitioning to the university, she worked in a variety of settings, including skilled nursing, home health, and public schools. Her current research and clinical pursuits include supervision, clinical education, phonology, and leadership.
    Summary
    Working smarter in clinical education has become a necessity amongst budget and time constraints, limited resources, and pressures for increasing student enrollment without increasing supervising faculty. Understanding the available, worthwhile resources for improved clinical education outcomes and increased supervisor efficiency is essential. The purpose of this presentation is to provide clinic supervisors with innovative methods for using technology in the university clinic to improve supervision. Participants will explore the diverse uses for video observations and recordings, identify and discuss barriers to funding and implementation, and problem solve to make implementation of technology possible even in the smallest regional universities.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Explain three ways supervisors can use technology as a clinical teaching tool to facilitate student learning, clinical skill outcomes, and supervisor effectiveness.
    • Identify and list potential barriers clinic directors may encounter for purchasing and implementing technology in a university clinic.
    • Analyze barriers for use of technology in supervision and identify potential opportunities to obtain funding for technology in a university clinic.

    POSTER - Student, Faculty, and Client Reflections on a Transition to Telepractice During COVID19 (.05 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 1:00 PM - 4/8/2021 1:30 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Amelia Rau, Ph.D. - Clinical Assistant Professor
      Dr. Amelia Rau has worked with a wide-range of individuals along the entire age spectrum of communication disorders and has extensive experience in graduate student supervision and bilingual service provision.
    • Benigno Valles, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Clinical Associate Professor
      Dr. Benigno Valles is a Clinical Associate Professor and Director of Clinics at the University of Texas-El Paso, Speech-Language Pathology Program. He is a certified bilingual (English/Spanish) clinician with research interests in multicultural/multilingual issues especially accent modification and speech sound disorders. Dr. Valles has presented at local, state, national and international conferences.
    • Deena G. Peterson, M.S., CCC-SLP - Instructor/Clinical Supervisor
      Deena G. Peterson, M.S., CCC-SLP, is an El Paso, Texas native who currently serves as a lecturer and clinical supervisor at the University of Texas at El Paso. She has over 15 years of experience serving and treating the El Paso community through settings including Early Childhood Intervention, home health, and currently, the university. She has completed research in the areas of voice and clinical education.
    • Gloria Macias-DeFrance, M.A., CCC-SLP - Program Coordinator/Manager
      Gloria Macias-DeFrance M.A., CCC-SLP, is the Program Manager/Coordinator for the University of Texas at El Paso. She is a clinical supervisor and coordinates off campus clinical experiences. She is involved in research in the Voice Modification Clinic for Transgender Persons. Gloria is a volunteer with the El Paso Cleft Palate Team. She currently serves on the El Paso Speech Language Hearing Association board as the First Vice President.
    • Heather Ramirez, B.S. - Graduate Student Clinician
      Heather Ramirez B.S., received her bachelor's degree in Science in Communication Disorders from New Mexico State University is currently attending the graduate program at the University of Texas at El Paso. She will graduate with her M.S. in Speech-Language Pathology in May of 2021. She has additional experience with clients in voice modification, accent modification, and preschool-aged students in the school setting.
    • Leanna Peru - Graduate Student Clinician
    Summary
    This poster shares the struggles, successes, and lessons learned during COVID19 for 20 graduate clinicians, four faculty supervisors and 20 clients who rapidly transitioned to telepractice together. All participants were new to telepractice service provision at baseline. With aggressive training, reflective-practice and transparent collaboration with clients, their story highlights the power of commitment as a critical variable in overcoming barriers to crisis-related change. Both the overlapping and non-overlapping themes, quotes, and reflections of each group represented (students, faculty, and clients) reveal important insights about the value of clinical education in the area of telepractice within university graduate curricula.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Identify pre-professional and supervisory training needs for telepractice.
    • Discuss strategies for designing and sustaining university clinical education that incorporates telepractice matched with community needs.
    • Consider the range of valuable experiences and insights student, faculty, and clients may access during rapid crisis teaming.

    POSTER - Zooming in on Interprofessional Practice Opportunities Through Experiences in Service-Learning (.05 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 1:00 PM - 4/8/2021 1:30 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Jennifer M. Brello, M.Ed., CCC-SLP - Clinical Associate Professor
      Jennifer Brello, M.Ed., CCC-SLP, is a Clinical Associate Professor at the Ohio State University and the Director of the OSU Aphasia Initiative. She is a clinical supervisor, course instructor, and academic advisor. She has over 20 years of experience supporting adults who have experienced acquired brain injury. Jennifer's clinical and research interests are in supportive communication and service learning.
    • Lisa Juckett, Ph.D., OTR/L, CHT - Instructor
    Summary
    Interprofessional service-learning opportunities exist for students enrolled in speech pathology and occupational therapy programs at Ohio State University. The COVID pandemic forced clinical training programs to pursue telehealth service delivery models to meet the needs of clinical education for students while providing care to vulnerable clientele. Telehealth in allied health professions has been bourgeoning, yet recommendations for effective implementation have yet to be established. As a result, students may feel ill-prepared when delivering services to clients through telehealth platforms. This study examined SLP and OT students’ confidence before and after delivering telehealth services to adults with language and communication disorders.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe the Student Confidence Questionnaire (SCQ; Derdall et al., 2002) adapted for the implementation of telehealth services in service-learning.
    • Describe the process for developing an interprofessional service-learning experience in adult neurogenics.
    • Describe the process for delivering interprofessional treatment to adults with language and communication disorders through telehealth.

    ** Not Attending a Session During this Time Slot

    4/8/2021 1:00 PM - 4/8/2021 1:30 PM ET

    CAPCSD President's Update

    4/8/2021 1:30 PM - 4/8/2021 2:00 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Carol Dudding, Ph.D. - Professor
      Carol Dudding Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is Professor at James Madison University. She conducts research on the uses of technology for clinical education, including simulations, telesupervision, and distance education. Carol is an ASHA Fellow, Certified Healthcare Simulation Educator, and Distinguished Fellow of the National Academies of Practice. She currently serves as CAPCSD President and previously served as VP for Standards, Credentials and Clinical Education, 2013-2017.
    Summary
    CAPCSD President's Address

    ** Not Attending a Session During this Time Slot

    4/8/2021 1:30 PM - 4/8/2021 2:00 PM ET

    PLENARY - A Framework for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (.15 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 2:00 PM - 4/8/2021 3:30 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Danai Kasambira Fannin, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Dr. Fannin is an Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Disorders at North Carolina Central University. She is a licensed speech-language pathologist whose research interests include cultural and socioeconomic effects on communicative functions, appropriate intervention and evaluation for culturally and linguistically diverse people, interdisciplinary intervention for toddlers and preschoolers with developmental disabilities, and autism intervention for young children in underserved, rural areas.
    • Jamila Harley, M.Ed., CCC-SLP - Associate Director
      Jamila Harley, M.Ed., CCC-SLP, is an Associate Director for Healthcare Services in Speech-Language Pathology with ASHA. Jamila currently serves as Co-Editor for the National Black Association for Speech-Language and Hearing's national newsletter. She is passionate about recruitment, retention, and leadership development of Black students in the field of Communication Sciences and Disorders. Her interests also include increased interest, access, and representation of Black SLPs in healthcare settings.
    • Kerry C. Mandulak, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor
      As Chair of Graduate Admissions in the Pacific University School of Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD), Kerry Callahan Mandulak, Associate Professor, has seen firsthand the power of using holistic review processes to increase the diversity of the speech-language pathology and audiology workforce. She has served as member and past Chair of the CSDCAS Committee. Through her research and speaking opportunities, Dr. Mandulak continues the national conversation around this important work.
    • Lauren E. Bland, Ph.D. - Associate Professor/Graduate Program Director
      Lauren Bland is the Speech-Language Pathology Graduate Program Director at Western Kentucky University and has served on ASHA’s Scientific and Professional Education Board for three years and the National Student Speech Language and Hearing Association Executive Council from 2000-2006 as a consultant. She was a site visitor for the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology for 12 years and was on the board from 2017-2020.
    • Nidhi Mahendra, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Department Chair
      Nidhi Mahendra, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is a tenured faculty member and chair of the department of Communicative Disorders and Sciences. An active teacher-scholar, bilingual SLP and leader, her areas of expertise are in JEDI (Justice, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion), adult neurogenic language disorders, aging and wellness, and the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL).
    • Teresa Girolamo, M.S., M.A. - Ph.D. candidate
      Teresa Girolamo, M.S., M.A., is a Ph.D. candidate in child language at the University of Kansas. Her interests lie in advancing equity and inclusion. In research, Teresa is interested in the language abilities of individuals with autism across the lifespan and currently works with minority young adults on the autism spectrum. In CSD and higher education, Teresa is committed to working to ensure everyone has equitable access to opportunities.
    Summary
    Equity and inclusion require intentional, active and evidence-based efforts to be successful. Programs need to use fully their spheres of influence to diversify their programs and create a welcoming community. This session will address ways to take concrete action steps to facilitate change.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Identify existing biases.
    • Reflect on the barriers the biases create.
    • Name three explicit strategies for implementing change in your program.

    ** Not Attending a Session During this Time Slot

    4/8/2021 2:00 PM - 4/8/2021 3:30 PM ET

    Being Actively Antiracist: One Program's Strategic Plan to Decenter Whiteness (.15 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 4:00 PM - 4/8/2021 5:30 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Jennifer Meyer, M.S., CCC-SLP - Director of Clinical Education
      Jennifer Meyer is the Director of Clinical Education at the University of Oregon and led the program's transition to a specialty clinic training model. Her background is in medical speech pathology and healthcare and rehabilitation management/administration.
    • Samantha Shune, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor, Program Director
      Samantha Shune, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an Assistant Professor and the Program Director of the Communication Disorders and Sciences Program at the University of Oregon. Her research and clinical interests include the effects of aging on the physiologic and social aspects of the swallowing and mealtime processes. She teaches in the area of medical speech-language pathology and received an ASHA AARC Award to develop new dysphagia-related classroom training modules.
    Summary
    In witnessing continued racial injustice and oppression, our program recognizes our responsibility to work towards dismantling deeply embedded systemic and institutionalized racism. Located in a state with historic exclusionary practices, our faculty is continuously developing an explicit, sustainable strategic plan to decenter whiteness. Our active plan, which engages students/prospective students, faculty, community partners, and alumni, was highlighted by the National Student Speech-Language-Hearing Association in their 'Raw Conversations' on antiracism in education. In this workshop, strategic goals impacting mentorship, admissions, student and faculty supports, clinical inclusion practices, amplification of underrepresented voices, and inclusion of antiracism training will be shared.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Identify strategies for engaging in faculty self-reflection, education, and training.
    • Define barriers for increasing the number of BIPOC practitioners and describe opportunities for programs to mitigate the barriers.
    • Identify techniques for ensuring the sustainability of programmatic anti-racist efforts.

    Integrating Virtual Clinical Education into Graduate Programs During the Pandemic and Beyond (.15 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 4:00 PM - 4/8/2021 5:30 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Erica Williams, Ph.D. - Clinical Associate Professor
    • Mollie Harding, Au.D. - Clinical Associate Professor
      Mollie Harding, Au.D., CCC-A, is a clinical assistant professor in the College of Health Solutions at Arizona State University. Mollie serves as a clinical instructor in the on-campus clinic and teaches academic coursework in aural rehabilitation throughout the lifespan, counseling for communication disorders, pediatric audiology, and clinical preparedness for beginning graduate clinicians.
    Summary
    Prior to the coronavirus pandemic, Au.D. students at Arizona State University did not routinely participate in virtual learning during clinical education. All programs faced a sudden loss of in-person clinical education at the pandemic onset (Polovoy and Murray, 2020). Au.D. Clinical faculty used multiple forms of virtual learning during this disruption. Attendees will learn about the virtual clinical training that occurred, including the advantages and disadvantages of each from student and faculty perspectives, which were most effective in developing competencies from student survey data, published literature about virtual clinical learning, and how to develop an effective, unique clinical simulation.

    Learning Objectives:
    • After attending this session, participants will be able to identify advantages and disadvantages of virtual learning modalities from our student and faculty perspectives.
    • After attending this session, participants will be able to identify which modalities were most effective in developing specific skills per student survey data and from the current literature.
    • After attending this session, participants will be able to develop an effective virtual clinical simulation.

    Confronting Systemic Racism in CSD: A Roadmap for Academic Training Programs (.15 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 4:00 PM - 4/8/2021 5:30 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Adrian KC Lee, ScD - Professor and Chair
      Adrian KC Lee, ScD, is a Professor and Chair of the Department of Speech & Hearing Sciences at the University of Washington, Seattle. He obtained his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering at the University of New South Wales and his doctorate at the Harvard-MIT Division in Health Sciences and Technology. Dr. Lee’s research focuses on developing multimodal imaging techniques to investigate the cortical network involved in auditory attention.
    • Diane Kendall, MPH, Ph.D. - Professor
      Dr. Diane Kendall is a Professor in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington, USA. Her line of research focuses on rehabilitation of aphasia and, more recently, on academic program development in low- and middle-income countries and identifying system issues that contribute to health disparities.
    • Hannah Siburt, Au.D., Ph.D. - Assistant Professor
      Hannah Siburt, Au,D., Ph.D., is a Clinical Assistant Professor and the AuD Program Coordinator at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is a graduate of Radford University and the University of Florida. Her research and clinical interests include audiologic (re)habilitation across the lifespan, listening effort and clinical education. She is a licensed audiologist in the state of North Carolina.
    • Sara Kover, Ph.D. - Associate Professor
      Sara Kover, Ph.D., is an associate professor in Speech and Hearing Sciences at the University of Washington.
    • Valarie B. Fleming, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Professor & Chair
      Valarie B. Fleming, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is Professor and Chair in the Department of Communication Disorders at Texas State University where she teaches courses in adult neurogenics and swallowing disorders. Her passion for the profession and teaching, as well as her interests in the access and utilization of healthcare services by underrepresented populations spurred her to assist faculty in developing inclusive classroom practices and preparing culturally competent clinicians.
    Summary
    The field of Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) lacks racial, ethnic, and gender diversity and the question academic programs need to ask is: “From a social justice perspective, what are the ways in which department and/or institutional systems negatively impact the recruitment and retention of minority students and faculty?” We purport that in order to increase diversity in our field we need to focus on the oppressive systems in which our CSD programs operate that disrupt equity and perpetuate whiteness. But how can programs make change? Here we provide a practical roadmap for chairs and program directors.

    Learning Objectives:
    • To describe institutional, symbolic and individual systems of oppression.
    • To describe how working at the level of cultural competence and diversity is not enough to increase diversity representation in CSD.
    • To describe practical solutions for systems level change in their own program and/or department.

    Servant Leadership in Higher Education (.15 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 4:00 PM - 4/8/2021 5:30 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Jeff L. Buller, Ph.D. - Senior Partner
      Jeffrey L. Buller is a senior partner in ATLAS: Academic Training, Leadership, and Assessment Services, having served in administrative positions ranging from department chair to vice president for academic affairs at four institutions: Loras College, Georgia Southern University, Mary Baldwin College, and Florida Atlantic University. He is the author of 23 books on education leadership, a textbook for first-year college students, a book of opera essays, and several novels.
    Summary
    The traditional image of the leader is someone who stands at the front of the line (or the top of a pyramid) and rules by command. In 1970, however, Robert Greenleaf began a movement known as servant leadership: an approach in which those in charge see their role as caring for the stakeholders of an organization, not dictating to them. How does this approach function in the unique organizational culture of higher education? What does it actually mean to serve those whom you lead?

    Learning Objectives:
    • Apply the principles of servant leadership in practice.
    • Avoid some of the major pitfalls of academic leadership.
    • Encourage others to engage in servant leadership.

    The Culture of Poverty: Culture, Racism, and Bias in the Clinical Setting (.15 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 4:00 PM - 4/8/2021 5:30 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Shameka Stanford, Ph.D., CCC-SLP/L - Associate Professor
      Dr. Shameka N. Stanford is an Associate Professor in the Communication Sciences and Disorders department at Howard University. She also serves as the department's Program Director. She specializes in Juvenile Forensic Speech-Language Pathology and the Confluence of cognitive-communicative disorders on minority youth placed at-risk for school-to-prison confinement. Dr. Stanford's a clinically certified and licensed SLP in Maryland and Washington, D.C. She is known worldwide as the Juvenile Forensic SLP.
    Summary
    The culture of poverty is a theory that an individual's poverty is secondary to their values and norms. This idea is problematic and can lead current and future clinicians to inaccurately assess, diagnose and treat children living in under resourced environments. This theory can also perpetuate racism and bias in the clinical setting. This session is designed to discuss the ways for CSD educators to begin the preparation and conversations with future clinicians on cultural values, cultural awareness and cultural sensitivity regardless of the economic impact the client is experiencing.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Identify signs, risk-factors, and impact of poverty within our clinical populations
    • Summarize the research on the impact of childhood poverty related to the assessment and treatment of speech, language, and hearing disorders
    • Articulate the clinician’s role in the long-term education and advocacy for underserved clients/patients.

    Transforming Entry-level Education for SLPs: What Might It Look Like (.15 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 4:00 PM - 4/8/2021 5:30 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Lemmietta G. McNeilly, Ph.D., CCC-SLP CAE - Chief Staff Officer, Speech-Language Pathology
      Dr. McNeilly is an ASHA Fellow, Distinguished Scholar and Fellow of the National Academy of Practice. She has published and conducted seminars internationally for leaders in academia and health care on leadership, innovative models of education, interprofessional education, the International Classification of Functioning (ICF), working with SLPAs and multicultural populations.
    • Lynn Williams, Ph.D. - Associate Dean and Professor
      A. Lynn Williams, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor at East Tennessee State University. Dr. Williams recently served as the ASHA Vice-President for Academic Affairs in Speech-Language Pathology (2016-2018) and chaired the Ad Hoc Committee on Graduate Education in SLP (2018-2020).She is the 2021 ASHA President.
    Summary
    ASHA’s Ad Hoc Committee on Graduate Education for Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs) collected and synthesized survey and focus group data from multiple stakeholder groups concerning their perceptions of what is needed now, and in the future, to adequately prepare SLPs to enter practice and which aspects of the current model of entry-level education are serving the profession and the public adequately and which aspects are not. The committee recommended that work continue to identify potential solutions and to explore alternative models that could address some of the extant challenges and leverage opportunities to better prepare SLPs for the future of work.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe educational challenges identified by ASHA members in preparing speech-language pathologists to enter clinical practice within the current model.
    • Discuss perceptions about what is needed now, and in the near future, to adequately prepare speech-language pathologists (SLP) to enter practice.
    • Summarize data and concerns that led to the recommendation that ASHA continue to convene stakeholders to work on identifying potential solutions to the persistent challenges and opportunities that could advance entry-level education for SLPs.

    ** Not Attending a Session During this Time Slot

    4/8/2021 4:00 PM - 4/8/2021 5:30 PM ET

    REPEAT - How Policies and Procedures Can Create Inclusivity in CSD (.15 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 5:30 PM - 4/8/2021 7:00 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Kia Noelle Johnson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Kia Noelle Johnson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an Associate Professor at the University of Houston (TX) in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders. She specializes in Fluency and Fluency Disorders with focus on childhood stuttering. Her research interest is in the examination of speech disfluencies in culturally/linguistically diverse children. She serves on the ASHA Board of Directors, is the National Advisor to National NSSLHA, and chairs the NBASLH Board of Directors.
    Summary
    Repeat of 8:00 a.m. ET session

    Many program policies and procedures were developed by and for students, faculty, and staff of mainstream US culture. These policies and procedures have the unintended consequence of creating exclusivity in CSD programs and perpetuate marginalization of culturally diverse groups within these programs. This session will provide the opportunity to more closely examine how this happens and propose solutions to create more inclusive policies and procedures.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe the importance of evaluating policies and procedures of CSD programs from a diversity, equity, and inclusion perspective.
    • Identify potential barriers to diversity, equity, and inclusion found in policies and procedures of CSD programs.
    • Develop an action plan to strategically review, evaluate, and modify policies and procedures within your program.

    REPEAT - Solving the Supervisory Bottleneck: 2:1 Supervision (.15 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 5:30 PM - 4/8/2021 7:00 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Jill P. Bates, M.S., CCC-SLP - Clinic Director
      Jill Bates, M.S., CCC-SLP, is the Clinic Director for Calvin University's Speech Pathology and Audiology Department. She developed Calvin's on-campus speech and hearing clinic and also collaboratively developed the new interprofessional rehabilitation clinic. Calvin University continues to run the donation-based On Campus Clinic to serve pediatric and adult clients. Spectrum Health has partnered with Calvin Rehabilitation Services and formed Karen Duffy Jennifer Dennis Linsey Jones.
    • Joy A. McKenzie, Ed.D., CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor/Clinical Director
      Joy McKenzie, Ed.D., CCC-SLP, is an Assistant Professor and Clinical Director in the Communication Sciences and Disorders program at St. Cloud State University. She received her M.S. in Speech-Language Pathology at Minnesota State University Moorhead in 2004 and her Ed.D. in Higher Education Administration at SCSU in 2020. She enjoys learning about personal and professional development including supervision practices to bridge courses to clinic and academia to workforce settings.
    Summary
    Repeat of 8:00 AM ET session

    The two-hour CEU supervision requirement has highlighted challenges in recruiting and supporting clinical educators. Graduate programs rely on clinical educators to help prepare future speech-language pathologists and audiologists. This session will explore barriers that programs are facing in identifying and supporting clinical educators. Clinical supervision, as a culture, is embedded within the Communication Sciences and Disorders professions, which impacts current clinical educator preparedness efforts. In order to have effective change initiatives, considering the needs of the clinical educator to be effective must occur. Current research and exploration of resources are available to help programs provide support to clinical educators.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe the challenges in finding clinical educators.
    • Identify strategies for recruiting new extern clinical educators.
    • List innovative ways to assist clinical educators in meeting supervision competencies.

    REPEAT - Council of Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-language Pathology (CAA) Update (.15 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 5:30 PM - 4/8/2021 7:00 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Jaynee Handelsman, Ph.D., CCC-AUD - Chair of Council on Academic Accreditation in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology
      Jaynee A. Handelsman, Ph.D., CCC-A, is the 2021 Chair of the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA) and is an Audiology Practitioner Member of the Council.
    • Kimberlee Moore, MPP - Director of Accreditation
      Ms. Kimberlee Moore, MPP, is the director of accreditation for the Council on Academic Accreditation (CAA)/American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). She provides strategic leadership, management oversight and accreditation subject matter expertise to the accreditation program and serves as a non-voting ex-officio member of the CAA.
    Summary
    Repeat of 8:00 a.m. ET session

    This session will focus on the current work of the Council of Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA) related to the implementation of the 2017 Standards, as well as updates to the Standards and accreditation processes. The most frequently cited standards in accreditation decisions and appropriate responses to citations will also be discussed.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe updates to Standards and accreditation processes.
    • Discuss Standards interpretation and application.
    • Describe the appropriate program responses to citations in annual reports and reaccreditation reports.

    REPEAT - Guidelines for Implementing Graduate Student Telepractice Training Programs (.15 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 5:30 PM - 4/8/2021 7:00 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Joneen Lowman, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Joneen Lowman, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Kentucky. She is Project Director for LinKS, a federal grant to train graduate CSD students in telehealth, and the Program Director for the interprofessional telehealth graduate certificate. Her teaching, research, and publications focus on the use of technology for treating childhood language disorders and telehealth.
    • Judy Walker, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Judy Walker, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an Associate Professor and Coordinator of the University of Maine, Speech Therapy Telepractice Training Program in the University of Maine, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders. Her academic and research interests include speech therapy telepractice, neurolinguistics, and cognitive neuroscience. Dr. Walker established the telepractice program in 2012 which has become a model of best practices for telepractice training and service delivery both nationally and internationally.
    • K. Todd Houston, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVT - Professor
      K. Todd Houston, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVT, is a Professor, Speech-Language Pathologist (SLP), and a Listening and Spoken Language Specialist (LSLS) Certified Auditory-Verbal Therapist (Cert. AVT) on the faculty of the School of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology at the University of Akron (Akron, OH). He also serves as an SLP & LSLS Cert. AVT for the Cochlear Implant Program at Akron Children’s Hospital.
    Summary
    Repeat of 8:00 a.m. ET session

    The COVID- 19 pandemic accelerated the integration of telepractice training into graduate-level speech-language pathology programs. Educating CSD graduate students in telepractice is essential to uphold best clinical practices, tele-ethical responsibilities and telehealth regulatory requirements in providing the highest quality telepractice services. Three well-established graduate student telepractice training programs will highlight best practices for preparing future clinicians to effectively and ethically deliver speech-language telepractice services and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic for future training.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Identify challenges in implementing telepractice training programs.
    • Describe the steps in creating different telepractice training models.
    • Describe telepractice clinical competencies.

    REPEAT - Lessons Learned from Teaching During a Pandemic: Improved Pedagogy from Remote Teaching (.15 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 5:30 PM - 4/8/2021 7:00 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Jennifer Friberg Ed.D. - Interim Chair, Cross-Endowed Chair in SoTL
      Dr. Jennifer Friberg serves as Interim Director for the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Technology, Cross-Endowed Chair in SoTL, and Professor of Communication Sciences & Disorders at Illinois State University. She is the founding Associate Editor for Teaching and Learning in Communication Sciences & Disorders and is the co-editor of Case Studies in Evidence-Based Education: A Resource for Teaching in Clinical Professions.
    • Jim Gee, M.S. - Coordinator
      After spending 15 years in broadcast journalism and journalism education, Jim Gee now serves as Communication coordinator for the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Technology at Illinois State. This includes facilitating workshops and consultations for faculty, in addition to doing outreach to Illinois State University faculty and staff about the Center's many services. He hosts CTLT's podcast, Let's Talk Teaching. He still teaches most semesters in the School of Communication.
    • Nancy Chick, Ph.D. - Director
      Nancy Chick (Ph.D., English) is Director of the Endeavor Foundation Center for Faculty Development at Rollins College (Florida, USA) and Co-President of the International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (ISSOTL). She is editor of SoTL in Action (2018), co-editor of SoTL as Public Scholarship (2021), co-editor of two Exploring Signature Pedagogies books (2009, 2012), and founding co-editor of Teaching & Learning Inquiry, the journal of ISSOTL.
    Summary
    Repeat of 8:00 a.m. ET session

    Teaching during a pandemic has created challenges but has influenced our teaching practices, as well. Many of the lessons we have learned as a result of COVID-19 will continue to positively influence our academic practices for the years to come. This session will feature an interview of two scholars of teaching and learning who will share their perspectives on post-pandemic pedagogy and discuss ways in which our collective experiences as teachers in 2020 might be viewed as opportunities for continued growth and improvement in course design and implementation.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Discuss the challenges faced transitioning to remote teaching.
    • Identify three positive impacts learned in the transition.
    • Describe ways in which each positive impact can be extended beyond COVID to improve teaching and learning in CSD.

    REPEAT - Building an Academic Community That Is Diverse, Accomplished, and Collegial (.15 CEUs)

    4/8/2021 5:30 PM - 4/8/2021 7:00 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Celeste Domsch Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Professor and Regents' Teacher
      Dr. Celeste Domsch is a Professor in the Department of Communication Disorders at Texas State University. She was named a Regents' Teacher of the Texas State University System in 2020. She also serves as the Graduate Program Director and Graduate Advisor. Dr. Domsch has co-directed Study Abroad opportunities in the United Kingdom and Peru. Her areas of research interest include child language disorders and the development of cultural competence.
    • Valarie B. Fleming, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Professor & Chair
      Valarie B. Fleming, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is Professor and Chair in the Department of Communication Disorders at Texas State University where she teaches courses in adult neurogenics and swallowing disorders. Her passion for the profession and teaching, as well as her interests in the access and utilization of healthcare services by underrepresented populations spurred her to assist faculty in developing inclusive classroom practices and preparing culturally competent clinicians.
    Summary
    Repeat of 8:00 a.m. ET session

    Retaining a diverse population of students begins prior to students being admitted. The Department of Communication Disorders at Texas State University has graduated majority-minority graduate cohorts and currently has an undergraduate program that is majority-minority. This session will present lessons learned and strategies programs can use to support the success of all students from admittance to graduation and beyond.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Discuss ways to recruit and retain talented faculty.
    • Identify ways to diversify the applicant pool for graduate programs.
    • Describe ways to mentor undergraduate students through the pipeline to graduate school.
    • Connect the importance of engaging alumni with retention and success of current students.

    ** Not Attending a Session During this Time Slot

    4/8/2021 5:30 PM - 4/8/2021 7:00 PM ET

    Effective Hearing Competencies Obtained Through Simulated Patients for SLP Students (.10 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 8:00 AM - 4/9/2021 9:30 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Saneta Thurmon, M.A., CCC-SLP/A - Program Director, Assistant Professor
      Saneta Thurmon, M.A., CCC-SLP/A, is the director of the Undergraduate Program of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Saint Louis University (SLU). She has dual certification in both Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology. She has devoted her career to Aural Rehabilitation/Habilitation and clinical supervision. She currently teaches several courses at SLU, which include: Clinical Methods, Clinical Observation, Counseling, Clinical Practicum, Research Seminar, and Aural Rehabilitation. She is an assistant professor at SLU.
    Summary
    Are your SLP graduate students competent and confident when providing services to clients who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing? This session discusses two clinical education learning models where SLP graduate students were assigned a semester with in-person aural rehabilitation patients compared to simulated aural rehabilitation patients. Student survey results completed by cohorts of students will be shared to identify learning outcomes and clinical competencies from both experiences. This session will review the reflective supervision model which allows the clinical process to be viewed from various perspectives and encourages best clinical practices in the clinical process.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe how Aural Rehabilitation /Audiology Simucase patients can provide hearing competencies and meaningful IPE experiences for SLP graduate students.
    • Review student surveys of student reflections of experiences with in-person aural rehabilitation clinical experiences to simulated aural rehabilitation patient experiences.
    • Describe research demonstrating the need for future SLPs to be able to write goals for Deaf and Hard of Hearing patients as well as basic troubleshooting of HAs, and CIs.

    Role of Personal Wellness in Preventing Student (and Faculty) Burn-out (.15 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 8:00 AM - 4/9/2021 9:30 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Jamie Kulzer, Ph.D., CRC, LPC - Assistant Professor
      Jamie Kulzer, Ph.D., CRC, LPC, is an Assistant Professor at the University of Pittsburgh in the Clinical Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling program. Dr. Kulzer teaches, mentors, and provides clinical supervision to Masters-level students. In addition, Dr. Kulzer is the Project Director/Principal Investigator of an Intergovernmental Agency Agreement (IAA) that provides programs of assistive technology, cognitive rehabilitation, and rehabilitation psychology at a state-run vocational rehabilitation facility.
    • Laura J. Dietz, Ph.D. - Associate Professor
      Laura J Dietz, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor at the University of Pittsburgh in the School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences, where she teaches graduate students in the Clinical Rehabilitation & Mental Health Counseling program. She is a clinical and developmental psychologist whose research focuses on risk factors for depression and psychosocial interventions for mood disorders. Dr Dietz has developed and tested curriculum for promoting mental wellness in graduate students.
    Summary
    This workshop will describe a personalized education program for graduate student wellness piloted at the University of Pittsburgh’s School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences (SHRS). The Pitt Wellness Program includes psychoeducation on creating a self-care plan, relaxation and stress management skills, and building support networks during graduate training. Data on program satisfaction, self-care strategies, coping skills, stress, behavioral health concerns, and sense of belonging in their programs will be presented. The Pitt Personal Wellness program will provide faculty with curriculum that can be used to increase self-care in graduate students (and faculty) in the communication science disorders fields.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe the role of self-care and wellness in preventing professional burnout in graduate students/trainees.
    • Develop a personalized self-care plan that incorporates diversified personal wellness strategies into weekly routines.
    • Construct a curricular component that provides mentorship on stress management and self-care strategies for graduate students/trainees.

    The Value of an Undergraduate CSD Education (.15 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 8:00 AM - 4/9/2021 9:30 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Tonya Bergeson, Ph.D. - Associate Professor and Chair, Communication Sciences and Disorders
      Tonya Bergeson, Ph.D. is associate professor and chair of communication sciences and disorders at Butler University. She earned undergraduate degrees in psychology and music at Northwestern University and graduate degrees in psychology at University of Toronto. She has published research in language development, audiovisual perception, and music perception in infants to adults with and without hearing loss. Dr. Bergeson has been awarded several grants, including the National Institutes of Health.
    Summary
    Due to a changing landscape in higher education, public universities must now demonstrate how undergraduate students are prepared for the job market. In CSD we graduate more UG students than can be admitted to our graduate programs, amplifying the need for CSD programs to assist students’ understanding of marketable skills. This session will explore how undergraduate CSD programs can help develop skills that are valuable both for graduate CSD programs as well as employers outside of CSD.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Identify marketable skills in undergraduate CSD programs.
    • Develop/provide unique preparation to help students ‘stand out’ for non-CSD job and educational opportunities.
    • Explore student characteristics valuable both to graduate CSD programs and to potential non-CSD employers.

    Transforming Courses to Be More Inclusive (.15 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 8:00 AM - 4/9/2021 9:30 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Tommie L. Robinson, Jr., Ph.D. - Chief, Division of Hearing and Speech; Dir. Scottish Rite Center for Communication Disorders; Associate Professor of Pediatrics
      Tommie L. Robinson, Jr., Ph.D., is chief of the division of Hearing and Speech and director of the Scottish Rite Center for Communication Disorders at Children’s National Hospital in Washington, D.C. He is associate professor of pediatrics at The George Washington, University School of Medicine and Health Sciences. Dr. Robinson’s research and writings have focused on normal fluency behaviors in children, patient safety, and service delivery to children from diverse backgrounds.
    Summary
    This session will address the components necessary to make course instruction more inclusive for all learners. Successful strategies for modifying the courses and facilitating an inclusive environment will be discussed.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Identify gaps necessary to facilitate a change towards a more inclusive learning environment.
    • Describe two ways to modify course syllabi to address inclusivity.
    • Determine two additional ways to improve the learning environment for all students.

    The Introvert’s Guide to Academic Leadership (.15 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 8:00 AM - 4/9/2021 9:30 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Jeff L. Buller, Ph.D. - Senior Partner
      Jeffrey L. Buller is a senior partner in ATLAS: Academic Training, Leadership, and Assessment Services, having served in administrative positions ranging from department chair to vice president for academic affairs at four institutions: Loras College, Georgia Southern University, Mary Baldwin College, and Florida Atlantic University. He is the author of 23 books on education leadership, a textbook for first-year college students, a book of opera essays, and several novels.
    Summary
    Most leadership books and management courses are designed for extraverts. In fact, many of the practices commonly regarded as “effective leadership” (complete accessibility, ease and graciousness in social situations, the willingness to take calculated risks) come far more naturally to extraverts than to introverts. But well more than half of the people who choose an academic career are introverts. How can they be effective as leaders? This workshop explores how introverts can build on their strengths, compensate for their weaknesses, and balance their leadership teams so as to achieve more of their high-priority goals.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Build on their own strengths as introverts.
    • Compensate for or overcome their weaknesses as introverts.
    • Create a more balanced leadership team.

    ** Not Attending a Session During this Time Slot

    4/9/2021 8:00 AM - 4/9/2021 9:30 AM ET

    ACAE (ABA Joint Presentation) (.10 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 10:00 AM - 4/9/2021 11:00 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Carol Cokely, Ph.D. - Audiology Program Head
      Dr. Carol Cokely is a Clinical Professor and the Director of Clinical Education in audiology at the University of Texas at Dallas. She earned a bachelor’s degree from Queens College of the City University of New York, a master’s degree from Northwestern University, and her Ph.D. from Indiana University. Research and project development interests include clinical education assessment and outcomes.

    Adventures in Creating Simulated Experiences (.10 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 10:00 AM - 4/9/2021 11:00 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Anne Marie Tharpe, Ph.D. - Professor & Chair
      Dr. Tharpe is Professor and Chair, Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. She has a 40-year history of doing research and/or working clinically with children who have hearing loss. Of relevance to this presentation, she has served as Project Director of training grants continuously for 23 years and has published in the areas of problem-based learning and standardized patients for student training.
    • Jennine Harvey-Northrop, Ph.D. - Associate Professor
      Jennine Harvey-Northrop, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an Associate Professor at Illinois State University in the Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders. She conducts research in the area of cognitive aging, including cognitive and language interventions, dual-task assessments for cognitive hearing science, virtual reality for rehabilitation, simulations in interprofessional practice, and scholarship of teaching and learning.
    • Jessica Bowers, M.S. - Director of Clinic Operations
      Jessica Bowers, M.S., CCC-SLP, is a Lecturer and Director of Clinic Operations at Texas State University. She has worked primarily with families of children with developmental delays and pediatric feeding disorders through early childhood intervention, home health services and outpatient clinics. She coordinates IPE/IPP and clinical simulations within the Department of Communication Disorders and College of Health Professions at Texas State University.
    • Susan Scollie, Ph.D. - Professor
      Dr. Susan Scollie is a clinically trained audiologist and researcher who has worked in audiology teaching since 2003. Her primary areas of teaching and research are amplification, evidence-based practice, and early intervention. Her research contributions include hearing aid prescription, evaluation and fitting of hearing aid signal processing, and real ear measurement.
    Summary
    Commercially available simulation packages, while helpful in educating student clinicians, often fall short of meeting all clinical training goals. This panel will explore ways in which educational programs are filling the gap and developing simulated experiences to meet programmatic needs.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe the spectrum of low to high-tech simulation possibilities.
    • List at least three simulation ideas for your discipline.
    • Develop one complete simulation task that might be implemented locally.

    Budget Basics (.10 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 10:00 AM - 4/9/2021 11:00 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Colleen Le Prell, Ph.D. - Professor and Department Chair
      Colleen Le Prell, Ph.D., is the Emilie and Phil Shepps Professor of Hearing Science at the University of Texas at Dallas, where is the Chair of the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing and the Head of the Ph.D. program in Speech, Language, and Hearing Science. Her research is focused on noise-induced hearing loss and its prevention.
    Summary
    Most academic administrators receive little or no training on how to develop a budget. This session will provide an overview of budget basics, including various budget models used at different Universities, common terminology, and planning tools. Understanding sources of revenue, as well as costs, is critical when advocating for programmatic resources and investments that assure sustainability. In addition, fiscal planning is a key component when striving for growth in enrollment, course and/or degree offerings, and associated faculty. An academic entrepreneur is often encouraged as Schools seek to expand revenue streams; accurate budgeting of costs and revenue supports sustainability and growth.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Review basic elements of a budget, including funding sources.
    • Identify necessary components to understand and create a budget.
    • Explain how to leverage your budget in strategic planning.

    Data on Your Side: Supply and Demand for Faculty-researchers and Clinicians (.10 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 10:00 AM - 4/9/2021 11:00 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Judy Blackburn, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Director, Academic Affairs and Research Education
      Judy Blackburn, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an Associate Director of Academic Affairs and Research Education at the ASHA national office. She provides expert consultation on matters relating to the educational preparation of SLPs, audiologists, and researchers in communication sciences and disorders (CSD). Judy has over 15 years’ experience working in a variety of academic and clinical settings, including Towson University, Kennedy Krieger Institute, and Baltimore City Public Schools.
    • Michael J. Bamdad, M.A., CCC-SLP - Director of Clinical Education
      Michael J. Bamdad has worked with TBI patients and their families for over 20 years. He has been published and speaks nationally and internationally on the topics of executive functioning deficits and pragmatic disorders. He is currently working in the Department of Speech and Hearing Science at George Washington University.
    Summary
    What data may help show the need for maintaining or expanding current academic programs? Are we preparing a sufficient number of speech-language pathologists, audiologists, and faculty-researchers to meet workforce demands? How is the discipline advancing to increase diversity in the field? This session will feature reviews of current clinical and research personnel pipeline data, workforce data, and workforce demands in audiology and speech-language pathology from the 2019 CSD Education Survey.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Identify data collected through the CSD Education Survey, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, and ASHA Survey Research and Reports that can describe current workforce characteristics and employment projections for the audiology and speech-language pathology professions.
    • Describe national data trends for admission, enrollment, and graduation rates among graduate audiology and speech-language pathology programs, including trends toward increasing diversity in the field.
    • Describe national data trends for Ph.D. researcher education and employment in communications sciences and disorders.

    Got CSDCAS? Increase Efficiency for Informed Application Decisions with Centralized Application Service (.10 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 10:00 AM - 4/9/2021 11:00 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Christine Carmichael, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Professor, Graduate Program Coordinator
      Christine Carmichael, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is professor and graduate program coordinator for the Woolfolk School of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Our Lady of the Lake University. She also serves on the CSDCAS Advisory Committee through CAPCSD and chairs the CSDCAS Resource Subcommittee. Her clinical, teaching, and research interests focus on voice and swallowing disorders.
    • Karen Jacobs, M.A. - Vice President, Account Management
      With over 25 years of enrollment management and higher education technology experience, Karen Jacobs has held senior roles at Penn State and Jacksonville University and most recently served 13 years as AVP at Thomas Jefferson University. Karen seeks to create an environment for sharing common technologies and best practices; and contributing to the advancement of health professions education through comprehensive, innovative, holistic and collaborative technology.
    • Megan Woods, M.A. - Director of Centralized Admissions
      Megan Woods is the Director of Centralized Admissions for CAPCSD. She has over a decade of experience managing national programs in CSD higher education. She holds a master's degree in educational technology and an enthusiasm for the CSD education community.
    Summary
    This session will cover the benefits of CSDCAS including utilizing administrative tools for decision making, promoting your program to increase applicant diversity, communicating with applicants, data analyses, process continuity, and customer support. Ways to tackle obstacles and tap resources when joining CSDCAS will also be discussed.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe how the CSDCAS system works and how it may facilitate complex aspects of the admissions process.
    • List three reporting tools that can be used to analyze and export data from CSDCAS.
    • Identify three solutions for overcoming obstacles with administration, faculty or IT and how to tap into resources.

    Preparing a Collaborative Practice Ready Workforce: Report on IPE/IPP in Academic Programs (.10 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 10:00 AM - 4/9/2021 11:00 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Carolyn W. Higdon, Ed.D., CCC-SLP, F-ASHA, F-NAP - Professor
      Dr. Carolyn Wiles Higdon, CCC-SLP, F-ASHA, F-NAP, University of Mississippi, and CEO of Wiles Higdon & Associates, LLC. Her honors include ASHA Fellow, NAP Fellow, Phi Kappa Phi, and MSHA Honors and Clinician of the Year. Dr. Higdon has served ASHA/CAA through numerous committees and boards. Dr. Higdon is past ASHA VP, current Chair of the CAPCSD IPP IPE Committee, a CAA site visitor, and Editor of SIG 17 Perspectives.
    Summary
    This session will present information collected by CAPCSD and ASHA on the implementation of IPE/IPP approaches currently employed by CSD academic programs and how these practices align with established best practices for IPE/IPP including distance education. Attendees will discuss how to advance interprofessional education and practice at their institution along with opportunities for IPE/IPP outcomes assessment research. This session will also explore the perspective and role of professional associations (CAPCSD and ASHA) in promoting IPE/IPP as a priority for academic programs and clinical sites and available resources that foster best practice for preparing a collaborative practice workforce.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Identify data collected through the CAPCSD IPE/IPP Member Survey and the CSD Education Survey on interprofessional education in CSD academic programs.
    • Apply the data to further academic programs’ IPE/IPP offerings and opportunities for IPE research.
    • Describe ways to bridge interprofessional education to practice and research within IPE curricula.

    How Generational Biases Hold Us Back: Increasing Cross Generational Communication (.15 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 10:00 AM - 4/9/2021 11:00 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Amanda Stead, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Amanda Stead, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an associate professor at Pacific University in Oregon. She teaches courses in Communication and Aging, Aphasia, Progressive Neurological Disorders, and Counseling. Her research is in the area of language change in healthy aging and dementia evidenced-based education, and end-of-life care.
    • Renee Wendel, M.S. - Senior Lecturer and Director of Clinical Education
      Renee Wendel, M.S., CCC-A, Senior Lecturer and Director of Clinical Education in the Department of Communication Disorders at TXST University. Her service and teaching have been recognized, having been awarded the Faculty Excellence Award in Service in 2005 and 2010. She was the College of Health Professions Dean’s Nominee for the Presidential Award for Excellence in Service in 2012 and earned the Presidential Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2015.
    Summary
    Generational differences can significantly impact communication styles, assumptions, processes, and decision making. Generational values influence communication style and can have implications for academic and clinical learning. This session will focus on the nuances of generational communication styles with strategies to perspectives to increase positive learning outcomes.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Define generational differences and communication values.
    • Identify the impacts of generational bias and poor cross generational communication.
    • Describe strategies to address communication differences.

    ** Not Attending a Session During this Time Slot

    4/9/2021 10:00 AM - 4/9/2021 11:00 AM ET

    POSTER - Changing a Hands-on Service-Learning Courses to Virtual (.05 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 12:30 PM - 4/9/2021 1:00 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Allison Ventrone - Undergraduate Student Clinician
    • Camisha K. Hatcher, B.S. - Graduate Student Clinician
      Camisha K. Hatcher is a graduate student in the Master of Science in Speech Language Pathology program at Jacksonville University. She received her B.A. in Communication Sciences and Disorders, and a minor in Psychology from Jacksonville University in 2020. Her M.A. will be conferred in 2022. She is interested in working with adults and children who stutter, individuals with swallowing disorders, and people with aphasia.
    • Wyndi Capeci, M.S. CCC-SLP, M.S. Special Educator - Clinical Assistant Professor
      Wyndi L. Capeci M.S., CCC-SLP, is a Clinical Assistant Professor at Jacksonville University. She has a passion for connecting students to community-based experiences. Her background is in early intervention and school-age services. She is currently the VP for Educational Services for FLASHA. Wyndi also holds a master's degree in special education and is completing her doctorate in counseling and traumatology.
    Summary
    2020 has brought unique challenges to service-learning courses by limiting community-based interactions. The benefits of service-learning extend to both student competencies related to cultural competence (Green & Simon-Cereijido, 2019) and quality of academic life (Altosino & Armstrong, 2014). This poster details the mid-semester change of a service-learning course from an in-person, hands-on course experience to a fully on-line, virtual experience. Teaching methodologies, technology and syllabus changes will be discussed. Details focusing on the integration of meaningful experiences for both students and community partners will be highlighted. This poster will include community partner and student feedback.

    Learning Objectives:
    • List steps and resources to providing service-learning experiences virtually.
    • Describe techniques to engage community partners and students virtually to provide service.
    • List barriers and successes to virtual service-learning based upon feedback.

    POSTER - Companions on a Journey: A Virtual Interprofessional Case Discussion (.05 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 12:30 PM - 4/9/2021 1:00 PM ET

    Speakers
    • April D. Jardes, M.S., CCC-SLP - Clinical Instructor of CSD, Clinical Coordinator
      April Jardes M.S.,CCC-SLP, is a Speech Language Pathologist, Clinical instructor and the Clinical Education Coordinator for the Communication Sciences and Disorders Program at Rockhurst University in Kansas City, Missouri. She is an active member on the Interprofessional Education committee at Rockhurst; which is a group of allied health educators leading an initiative for University-wide interprofessional education and collaborative practice.
    • Christina Wisdom, PT/DPT - Associate Professor of Physical Therapy
      Christina Wisdom PT, DPT, is an Associate Professor of Physical Therapy at Rockhurst University in Kansas City, Missouri. Dr. Wisdom is Board Certified in Orthopedic Physical Therapy and a Certified Lymphedema Therapist. Dr. Wisdom is a member of the Interprofessional Education Committee of the College of Health and Human Services. Clinically, Dr. Wisdom practices at an outpatient orthopedic and pelvic health physical therapy practice in Kansas City.
    • Dave Heller, M.S. Ed., Ph.D. - Visiting Professor of Exercise Science
      Dave Heller, Ph.D., is a Visiting Professor in the Department of Health, Physics, and Applied Sciences and the Department of Physical Therapy, teaching Kinesiology and Motor Behavior. He is particularly interested in the application of non-linear analysis to measures of stability in pathological populations. He has presented at various forums, including the American Society of Biomechanics, the American College of Sports Medicine and the Missouri Physical Therapy Association.
    • Joan Z. Delahunt, OTD, M.S., OTR/L - Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy
      Dr. Joan Ziegler Delahunt is a positive occupational therapist, with over 20 years of experience working with children, families and adults with disabilities in a variety of settings. Dr. Delahunt enjoys building relationships with each client. Dr. Delahunt feels that being an OT allows her to promote healthy lifestyles and building interprofessional education and collaboration. Dr. Delahunt is the current Chair of the Interprofessional Education Collaborative committee at Rockhurst University.
    • Tobey Stosberg, MSN, M.A.E, RN - Assistant Professor of Nursing
      Tobey Stosberg, MSN, MAE, RN, is an Assistant Professor at Research College of Nursing in Kansas City, Missouri. Ms. Stosberg received her BSN and MSN from Research College of Nursing. She is currently pursuing her PhD in Nursing at University of Missouri Columbia. Ms. Stosberg also holds a BS in Biology and a MA in Education from Truman State University. Her clinical background is in obstetrics and surgery.
    Summary
    Students from Communication Sciences and Disorders, Exercise Science, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy and Nursing participated in an interprofessional learning activity utilizing a virtual interactive case discussion about a patient with a cerebrovascular accident. Prior to the event, students completed an online introductory IPE module. At the event, students engaged in virtual activities to learn about roles and responsibilities for patient care. Faculty facilitators led interprofessional small group discussions and debriefing. Exit survey data comparisons between the 2020 virtual event and the 2019 in-person event suggests that a virtual platform is effective for positive interprofessional learning experiences.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Examine a successful virtual interactive learning experience incorporating undergraduate and graduate students from multiple professions in a case study setting.
    • Identify useful tools and strategies to facilitate virtual interprofessional discussion about a case study.
    • Compare outcomes from an interprofessional case discussion facilitated virtually and in-person.

    POSTER - Creating Simulations for Hearing Competencies for SLP Students (.05 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 12:30 PM - 4/9/2021 1:00 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Alice Henton, SLP.D. - Associate Professor
      Alice Henton, SLP.D, CCC-SLP, is Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Harding University.
    Summary
    This session will present simulation technology and scenarios used to create opportunities for graduate students at Harding University to earn speech-language pathology clinical competencies in the area of hearing/aural rehabilitation. Results of both in-person and telepractice/telesupervision of this simulation will be discussed. Attendees will receive resources needed to provide graduate students with this unique learning experience.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Design hearing loss simulations for their programs.
    • Understand the challenges involved in creating hearing loss simulations.
    • Create scenarios for hearing loss simulations.

    POSTER - Instructors, Clinical Educators, and Speech-language Therapy Students Collaborate in Translational Learning (.05 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 12:30 PM - 4/9/2021 1:00 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Anita Mei-Yin Wong, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Anita M.-Y. Wong is an ASHA member in SLP, Associate Professor and the immediate past Director of Clinical Education for the BSc (Speech and Hearing Sciences, SHS) program at the University of Hong Kong (HKU). Her research and clinical interests are child language development and disorders in Chinese.
    • Carmela C., -Y. Tin, BSc - Clinical Educator
      Carmela Tin is an experienced SLT with a special interest in child speech and language disorders and a clinical educator. She is the Manager of the BSc (SHS) program’s teaching clinic.
    • Cecilia W-S M. Wong, BSc - Clinical Educator
      Ms. Au has extensive clinical speech therapy experience in assessing and treating children with speech and language disorders, as well as adults with various communication and swallowing needs. She also serves as clinical educator, supervising student speech therapists’ work with a range of clients. She has special clinical and research interest in children’s language learning.
    • Stephanie F. Stokes, Ph.D. - Professor
      Professor Stephanie F. Stokes is a speech-language pathologist and professor of communication disorders at the University of Hong Kong
    Summary
    In 2015, 25% of students failed clinical examinations in a speech-language therapy training program in Hong Kong. The external examiner interpreted this as “a lack of integration of content knowledge with the required clinical knowledge”. Since 2016, the program team has found solutions in 1) a revised curriculum that adopts the pedagogy of translational learning, 2) the use of authentic case-based materials that were developed through instructor-clinical educator-student collaboration, and 3) a shared vision of competent entry-level speech-language therapists. In this poster, we will present an integrated model of academic and clinical education, and share our reflection and lessons learned.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Upon completion, participants will be able to examine an integrated model of academic and clinical education from a different educational context.
    • Upon completion, participants will be able to reflect on their own challenges in the application of classroom knowledge to clinical practice.
    • Upon completion, participants will be able to develop three actions to be taken to meet their challenges.

    POSTER - Making Remote Learning Active and Meaningful: Service Learning for SLP Graduate Students (.05 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 12:30 PM - 4/9/2021 1:00 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Lesley Sylvan, M.S., Ed.D. - Assistant Professor
      Dr. Lesley Sylvan is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Montclair State University. Dr. Sylvan is a certified speech-language pathologist (SLP) with extensive clinical experience working with school-aged children both in public school and private settings. Dr. Sylvan's scholarly interests center on the intersection between the fields of education and speech-language pathology. She pursues research related to K-12 education as well as higher education.
    Summary
    Given the limitations of remote learning, instructors face challenges designing active learning activities. Beyond the challenges of remote instruction, research shows newly graduated SLPs are often unprepared for the challenges of working with struggling low-income students. In the fall of 2020, students in Montclair State University’s school-aged language development graduate course partnered with a community organization focused on supporting students at risk for school failure. This poster will share the details of this partnership. It will include data about how this service learning project prompted meaningful discussion about the achievement gap and the challenges in culturally and linguistically diverse settings.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Identify the potential of the service learning pedagogy to add value to SLP graduate education, especially in preparing SLPs to work in culturally and linguistically diverse school settings.
    • Describe an example of a partnership between a faculty member and a community organization focused on preventing school failure and explain how this partnership resulted in meaningful lessons.
    • Summarize the impact that a service learning activity had on graduate student learning after examining examples of related student work, including student reflection papers.

    POSTER - State Advocacy: Leadership Lessons Learned - (.05 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 12:30 PM - 4/9/2021 1:00 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Erin EG. Lundblom, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor & Clinical Education Coordinator for Speech-Language Pathology
      Erin E.G. Lundblom is an Associate Professor and Clinical Education Coordinator for Speech-Language Pathology at the University of Pittsburgh, where she provides course instruction to both undergraduate and graduate students. Her areas of interest encompass best practice in the provision of clinical services, school-based language and literacy services including service delivery options, and higher education pedagogy.
    • Mary Beth Mason, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Program Director, Professor
    • Robert W. Serianni, M.S., CCC-SLP, FNAP - Chair/Program Director
      Robert W. Serianni, M.S., CCC-SLP, FNAP, is the Chair/Program Director and Assistant Professor in the Department of Speech-Language Pathology at Salus University in Elkins Park, PA. In addition to supervising students in the clinic, Bob teaches classes, including an interprofessional class that incorporates students from across the various health disciplines represented at Salus. Prior to joining the faculty, Bob held clinical and administrative roles for a variety of healthcare providers.
    Summary
    During COVID-19, programs across the US had the opportunity to pivot traditional face-to-face course and clinical service delivery to virtual means. Successful departments were able to continue content delivery and clinical supervision online, although many of the current provisions that allow for these modifications remain temporary. Programs are banking on these quick-fixes implemented by federal and state agencies to become permanent. Members of the Pennsylvania Speech-Language-Hearing Association's Executive Board provide insights on how institutions of higher education can partner with State Associations to advocate for enduring alterations, highlighting the presenters' work with the Commonwealth of PA.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Identify three to five strategies for advocating for telepractice/telesupervision policies and practices.
    • List appropriate state and federal agencies that will support ongoing directives for the various delivery options in higher education.
    • Construct messages and communication plans that benefit permanent implementation of telepractice/telesupervision regulations.

    ** Not Attending a Session During this Time Slot

    4/9/2021 12:30 PM - 4/9/2021 1:00 PM ET

    POSTER - Gender of Authors in ASHA Research Journals: 2014-2020 (.05 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 1:00 PM - 4/9/2021 1:30 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Allan B. Smith, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor, Program Director
      Allan B. Smith, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is Associate Professor and Program Director of the new Master's Program in Speech-Language Pathology at Regis College in Massachusetts. Dr. Smith's research is primarily in acoustic measures of speech in children with speech, language, and/or reading disability. His other interests include language development and speech science.
    • Wen Wen, M.A., CCC-SLP - Speech-Language Pathologist
      Wen Wen M.A., CCC-SLP, is a speech-language pathologist at the Hillsborough School District. Areas of interest include speech science, language development, dysphagia, and bilingualism.
    Summary
    The gender ratios of authors were examined in all articles of four ASHA research journals: AJA, AJSLP, JSLHR, and LSHSS over the past seven years. The results are discussed in relation to the gender ratios in our field (i.e., ASHA members), as well as the gender ratios of individuals holding research doctoral degrees in our field (i.e., Ph.D., Ed.D.).

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe the proportion of women authors in ASHA research journals.
    • Identify how ASHA research journals compare in the gender of authors.
    • Identify how often women are listed as first author in ASHA research journals.

    POSTER - Intensive Comprehensive Aphasia Program (ICAP): Two Years Later, Lessons Learned (.05 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 1:00 PM - 4/9/2021 1:30 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Bernadine R. Gagnon, M.S., CCC-SLP - Chief Clinical Supervisor
      Bernadine Gagnon, M.S., CCC-SLP, is the Chief Clinical Supervisor and a Clinical Instructor at Teachers College, Columbia University and has worked in medical speech pathology for 20 years. Bernadine has published on motor speech disorders in the pediatric and adult populations. She developed the Aphasia Clinic at the Teachers College, Columbia University and co-developed the Intensive Aphasia Program at Teachers College with her colleague Lauren Liria.
    • Lauren Liria, M.S. CCC-SLP - Director of Clinical Education
      Lauren Liria, M.S. CCC-SLP, is the Director of Clinical Education and Clinical Assistant Professor for the Institute for Speech-Language Pathology at Widener University. Prior to this, she was the co-founder and director of the Intensive Aphasia Program for Reading and Writing at Teachers College, Columbia University. In addition, Lauren is a bilingual speech-language pathologist, serving Spanish- and English-speaking individuals across populations and clinical settings.
    Summary
    This poster presents the design of an Intensive Comprehensive Aphasia Program (ICAP) focusing on reading and writing. The program has run for three summers at Teachers College, Columbia University; twenty-six chronic phase participants have taken part in a four-week, five hours per day program via in person and teletherapy treatment paradigms. Pre and post-treatment measures were obtained and analyzed to identify program successes and challenges.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Identify the need and importance for creating dedicated ICAPs in a university clinic in person and via teletherapy.
    • State the steps required for developing a dedicated ICAP.
    • Explain the challenges and successes of an ICAP.

    POSTER - Portfolios as a Master’s Degree Capstone Project (.05 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 1:00 PM - 4/9/2021 1:30 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Billy T. Ogletree, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Professor
      Dr. Billy T. Ogletree is the Catherine Brewer Smith Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Western Carolina University. His research interests included the communication abilities and needs of persons with severe disabilities including autism. He is an ASHA Fellow.
    • Hunter Reeves, B.A., B.S., M.S CF-SLP, CDP - Graduate Student
      Hunter E. Reeves, M.S. CF-SLP, CDP, is a recent graduate from Western Carolina University. She received her temporary license and is practicing as a school SLP in Western North Carolina.
    • Johanna R. Price, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Johanna Price, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is Associate Professor at Western Carolina University in Cullowhee, NC. Her interests include the oral and written language development of children with neurodevelopmental disabilities (including autism, Down syndrome, and fragile X syndrome), typical development, and culturally diverse backgrounds. Dr. Price's interests also include interprofessional education and practice.
    • Leigh Odom, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, CDP, CADDCT - Associate Professor
      Leigh Morrow-Odom, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, CDP, CADDCT, is an Associate Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC. She has committed to educating others about neurogenic cognitive-communicative disorders to improve recovery and quality of life.
    Summary
    This poster describes the implementation of portfolios as a capstone project for master’s students in speech-language pathology (SLP) at a regional comprehensive university. Students develop a portfolio that demonstrates entry-level competence across the scope of practice in SLP. For each of ASHA’s Big 9 areas, students 1) assemble artifacts from coursework and clinical placements that represent seminal learning experiences, and 2) write an essay reflecting on growth and competence in that area. Procedures for supporting students’ development of portfolios, evaluating the capstone project, and modifying the project during COVID-19 are described. Literature supporting the use of portfolios is also discussed.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe procedures for implementing portfolios as a capstone project for master’s students in SLP.
    • Describe evidence that supports the use of portfolios as a capstone project.
    • Identify strategies for supporting students’ development of portfolios.

    POSTER - Service Disruption and Transition to Telepractice During the COVID-19 Pandemic (.05 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 1:00 PM - 4/9/2021 1:30 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Austin M. Conner, L.M.S.W. - Ph.D. Student
      Austin Conner is a doctoral student studying Social Welfare at the University of Mississippi. She is a Licensed Master Social Worker in the state of Mississippi. Her future plans are to influence social policies as a social work researcher.
    • Saijun Zhang, Ph.D. - Assistant Professor
      Dr. Saijun Zhang is an Assistant Professor of Social Work at the University of Mississippi School of Applied Sciences. His research focuses on youth behavioral health issues and victimization.
    • Ying Hao, Ph.D. - Assistant Professor
      Ying Hao is an Assistant Professor at Communication Sciences and Disorders at University of Mississippi. She received her Ph.D. from University of Texas at Austin. She focuses on child language development and disorders. Particularly, she studies the usage of telepractice for language intervention for children with communication disorders. Another line of her research is to explore linguistic manifestations of Developmental Language Disorder in monolingual and bilingual Mandarin-speaking children.
    Summary
    The study examined SLPs’ service disruption and transition during the pandemic. We collected both quantitative and qualitative data from ten SLPs in July and December 2020. Client number and clinical hours reduced by one third and one quarter respectively. Transformation to telepractice mitigated service disruption, yet substantial service reduction may indicate increased unmet service needs. Internet availability, parents’ telepractice acceptance, and technology fluency were regarded as key factors influencing telepractice outcomes. Despite challenges in telepractice, SLPs reported unique benefits (e.g., increased parent involvement). SLPs and client families have been experiencing increased stress due to the disruption and transition.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe how speech-language services have been disrupted during the pandemic.
    • Identify key factors that may determine client suitability for telepractice.
    • Explain the challenges and benefits of telepractice.

    POSTER - Teaching Transnasal Endoscopy 2020: Transition to Remote Learning Using Plumber’s Endoscopes (.05 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 1:00 PM - 4/9/2021 1:30 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Kaitlin Brooks, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor
      Kaitlin Brooks, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an assistant professor in the Communication Disorders Department at Molloy College. She is a certified speech-language pathologist with experience working with adults with speech, language and swallowing disorders in various settings. She conducts research in the areas of communication and swallowing disorders in adults.
    • Shari Salzhauer Berkowitz, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Shari Salzhauer Berkowitz, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an associate professor at Mercy College (Dobbs Ferry, NY). She teaches speech science, voice disorders and endoscopy. She mentors student research groups on data reduction, statistics and presentation of results. She is co-PI on a NIDILRR grant, studying patient/provider communication in teens with lupus.
    Summary
    Due to COVID-19, the endoscopy portion of our dysphagia course was offered remotely. This poster describes the teaching methods and equipment used to transition to online teaching of a traditionally hands-on skill. Students (N = 43) received the standard didactic lectures and instruction on passing the endoscope, with the addition of independent learning using plumber’s endoscopes. Students produced videos independently with plumber’s endoscopes to mimic activities typically undertaken in the simulation laboratory with mannequins. We show that adding plumber’s endoscopes to graduate programs’ lab equipment is an effective way to develop student engagement with the rudiments of manipulating an endoscope.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Compare and contrast medical endoscopes and plumber’s endoscopes.
    • Understand how to teach endoscopy via distance learning.
    • Brainstorm ways to improve endoscopic instruction.

    POSTER- ZOOM BOOM! Effectiveness of School-age Language Assessment Measures Through Tele-therapy (.05 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 1:00 PM - 4/9/2021 1:30 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Abigail Calise, B.S. - CSD Graduate Student
      Abigail Calise, M.S.candidate​ at Teachers College, Columbia University is a research assistant in Dr. Crowley’s lab. She completed her B.A. in Speech Pathology at St. Joseph’s College, Long Island. Working with Dr. Crowley has been a way for her to give back to the field of speech-language pathology.
    • Catherine Crowley, J.D., Ph.D., CCC-SLP - CSD Graduate Student
      Catherine Crowley, J.D., Ph.D., CCC-SLP, Professor of Practice in CSD program at Teachers College, Columbia University where she founded the bilingual/multicultural program focus and the Bilingual SLP Institute. An ASHA Fellow and experienced attorney, Dr. Crowley works to enhance the quality of services that children/adolescents receive, particularly bilingual and minoritized students. Dr. Crowley been recognized nationally and internationally for her work. Her widely-accessed website, leadersproject.org, offers free courses and resources.
    • Cha-Anya Glover, B.A. - CSD Graduate Student
      Cha-Anya Glover, M.S. candidate at Teachers College, Columbia University. She graduated from UConn with a B.A. in CSD and contributes to LEADERS Project as a research assistant. She has a passion for language development in children. Creating BOOM cards is a way for her to continue helping children flourish.
    • Christine Ulin, B.S. - CSD Graduate Student
      Christine Ulin, M.S. Candidate, at Teachers College, Columbia University and research assistant for LEADERSproject. She graduated from Emerson College in 2017 with a B.S. in CSD. She worked with bilingual populations teaching English in Madrid and was an SLP-A in Pasadena Unified School District in California before beginning graduate work in New York.
    • Danielle Askowitz, B.S. - CSD Graduate Student
      Danielle Askowitz is an M.S. candidate at Teachers College, Columbia University and a research assistant in Dr. Crowley’s Lab. She recently graduated from Tulane University with a Bachelor of Science degree. She enjoys helping diverse communities access materials through LEADERSproject.
    • Gabrielle Stern, B.A . - CSD Graduate Student
      Gabrielle Stern, B.A., a CSD graduate student at Teachers College, Columbia University
    • Kathleen White, B.S., MFA - CSD Graduate Student
      Kathleen White is an M.S. candidate at Teachers College, Columbia University and a research assistant for Dr. Crowley and the LEADERSproject. She completed her BS at the University of Evansville and has an MFA from the National Theatre Conservatory.
    • Melanie T. Alcala, B.A. - CSD Graduate Student
      Melanie Talin Alcala is a graduate student at Teachers College, Columbia University. She is pursuing a Master's in Communication Sciences and Disorders - Bilingual Extension: Dual Certification and recently earned her Bachelor of Arts from California State University, Fullerton. She supports LEADERS Project as a research assistant and currently serves as National NSSLHA's Vice President for Academic Affairs. Melanie looks forward to working with culturally and linguistically diverse populations.
    • Melanie T. Alcala, B.A. - CSD Graduate Student
      Melanie Talin Alcala is a graduate student at Teachers College, Columbia University. She is pursuing a Master's in Communication Sciences and Disorders - Bilingual Extension: Dual Certification and recently earned her Bachelor of Arts from California State University, Fullerton. She supports LEADERS Project as a research assistant and currently serves as National NSSLHA's Vice President for Academic Affairs. Melanie looks forward to working with culturally and linguistically diverse populations.
    • Sayume Romero, B.S. - CSD Graduate Student
      Sayume Romero, M.S. candidate at Teachers College, Columbia University is in her second year. She has presented at ASHA in Orlando and participated in a webinar on cleft palate for SLPs, surgeons, and orthodontists with Dr. Crowley. She is currently the student director of leadersproject.org.
    • Tiffany Neira, B.A. - CSD Graduate Student
      Tiffany Neira, B.A, is a second-year graduate student at Teachers College, Columbia University. She is currently serving as a graduate assistant for the Smile Train Indonesia Cleft Palate course. Tiffany’s interests include cleft palate and providing more resources for SLPs to provide culturally and linguistically appropriate services for all clients.
    Summary
    During COVID-19, evaluation materials that worked for in-person evaluations must be modified and then assessed as to whether they continue to be effective. The School-age Language Assessment Measures (SLAM), culturally responsive language elicitation materials, were reformatted as interactive Boom cards, called' SLAM BOOM!' cards. This poster assesses the continued usefulness of using the SLAM BOOM! cards to elicit rich language samples of same-aged peers by 1) comparing language samples previously elicited during in-person evaluations, and 2) measuring consistency of virtually elicited samples from a variety of cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Results are analyzed through subordination indexes and other dialect-neutral indices.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe one freely available approach to culturally responsive assessment including how to use them through both tele-therapy and in-person assessment, and how to access these free materials.
    • Identify two dialect-neutral approaches to analyze language samples.
    • Describe how to use SLAM BOOM materials for assessment and treatment with all students, including bilingual and bidialectal students.

    ** Not Attending a Session During this Time Slot

    4/9/2021 1:00 PM - 4/9/2021 1:30 PM ET

    CAPCSD Honors and Awards Recognitions

    4/9/2021 1:30 PM - 4/9/2021 2:00 PM ET

    ** Not Attending a Session During this Time Slot

    4/9/2021 1:30 PM - 4/9/2021 2:00 PM ET

    PLENARY - Communicating the Value of Our Professions: Professional and Program Advocacy (.15 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 2:00 PM - 4/9/2021 3:30 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Jeffrey Hoch, Ph.D. - Chief and Associate Director
      Jeffrey Hoch is Professor and Chief of the Division of Health Policy and Management in the Department of Public Health Sciences and the Associate Director of the Center for Healthcare Policy and Research at the University of California-Davis. He received his Ph.D. in health economics from Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. Professor Hoch has contributed 200+ articles. As an award-winning teacher, he has 250+ invited presentations in 15 countries.
    Summary
    The changing funding landscape necessitates that programs be able to communicate the value of the professionals that we are training as well as the value CSD programs bring to our academic communities. Fresh perspectives from health economics may help better communicate our value to stakeholders. Strategies from cost-effectiveness analysis succeed in many other healthcare fields to advocate successfully for value consistent with additional investment. This talk will introduce cost-effectiveness analysis and discuss how to apply it to demonstrate the value of what we do.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe why cost-effectiveness analysis is useful.
    • Describe what you need to do a cost-effectiveness analysis.
    • Describe what you need to use a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    ** Not Attending a Session During this Time Slot

    4/9/2021 2:00 PM - 4/9/2021 3:30 PM ET

    CFCC Update (.15 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 4:00 PM - 4/9/2021 5:30 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Gretchen Ehret Hoshaw, M.A., CCC-SLP - Associate Director of Certification, Programs
      Gretchen Ehret Hoshaw, M.A., CCC-SLP, is ASHA's Associate Director of Certification for Programs.
    • Patti Solomon-Rice, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Director and Associate Professor
      Patti Solomon-Rice, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is director and associate professor at the Woolfolk School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Our Lady of the Lake University, San Antonio. She's been a member of ASHA’s Council for Clinical Certification since 2017, serving as chair in 2021. She's a past member of ASHA's Board of Ethics, serving as chair in 2015. She served as an SLP member of California's licensing board from 2012-2018.
    • Todd R. Philbrick, CAE, Credentialing Specialist - Director, Certification
      Todd Philbrick, CAE, Credentialing Specialist has served as ASHA's Director of Certification and Ex Officio to the CFCC since 2014
    • Tom F. Muller, Au.D., CCC-A - Clinical Associate Professor and Coordinator of Clinical Education in Audiology
      Tom Muller, Au.D., CCC-A, a Clinical Associate Professor and the Coordinator of Clinical Education in Audiology for the University of Arizona, where he has been for almost 20 years. His clinical and research interests primarily include adults, hearing aids and cochlear implants. Dr. Muller serves on the Council for Clinical Certification as Vice Chair for Audiology (2019-2020) and Chair Elect (2021).
    Summary
    A session designed for Program Directors, Clinic Directors, university faculty, and clinical educators, this presentation addresses the 2020 Audiology and 2020 SLP Certification standards, accommodations made by the CFCC for those affected by COVID closures, the use of telepractice and telesupervision in clinical preparation, and the preliminary results of peer review surveys on the inclusion of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion initiatives and English language proficiency. An update of the Assistant’s certification programs will be included. Participants will have an opportunity to ask questions and speak with members of the Council for Clinical Certification in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CFCC).

    Learning Objectives:
    • List the accommodations identified by the CFCC to assist programs and students in meeting the 2020 ASHA Certification Standards in light of the pandemic.
    • Effectively communicate provisions for using telepractice, telesupervision, and clinical simulation to meet the clinical practicum requirements necessary for ASHA Certification.
    • Discuss the results of recent surveys and what may be included in the upcoming 2021 and 2022 Practice Analysis Studies.

    Beyond Xs and Os: Hybrid Telehealth Clinical Practicum Experiences in Audiology Administration/Management (.10 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 4:00 PM - 4/9/2021 5:30 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Gayla Guignard, M.A., CCC-A/SLP, LSLS Cert. AVT - Chief Strategy and Programs Officer
      Gayla Guignard, M.A., CCC-A/SLP, LSLS Cert. AVT, is the Chief Strategy Officer for AG Bell. An experienced clinician, supervisor, administrator, and leader, Gayla brings a unique understanding of the intersection between clinical care/service delivery, student supervision, professional practice, program management and systems change.
    • Julie Beeler, M.A., CCC-A/SLP - Program Liaison - Audiology & Speech Pathology
      Julie Beeler, M.A., is an audiologist and speech-language pathologist with the University of Tennessee Health Science Center Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology in Knoxville, where she serves as a Program Liaison and handles outreach, promotions, and community relations.
    • Patti M. Johnstone, Ph.D., CCC-A/SLP - Director of Clinical Education - Audiology, Associate Professor
      Patti Johnstone, Ph.D., CCC-A/SLP, is the Director of Clinical Education and an Associate Professor with tenure at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Knoxville, TN. She directs the departmental audiology clinic and the university clinical audiology supervisors. She facilitates contracting with and outreach to external, audiology clinical practicum sites. She directs research in spatial hearing to measure clinical outcomes for pediatric patients with hearing aids and/or cochlear implants.
    Summary
    Development of audiology students’ administrative/management skills in basic operations, fundraising, programming, productivity measurements, quality improvement, marketing, and billing/coding are key to successful real-world practice. Students benefit from exposure to and practice in the use of these skills. Audiology standards allow for students to participate in clinic administration so that they may gain understanding and application of executive skills such as planning, public speaking (including sharing of vision, mission, plans, goals, and outcomes), human resources management, content development, relationship-building (including networking), time management, work delegation, and leadership. Administration/Management practicum experiences serve to set students up for satisfying and successful careers in audiology.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe a hybrid telehealth learning model for expanding audiology student practicum experiences in administration/management.
    • Identify special administrative/management practicum experiences or opportunities in their own university program.
    • Identify inter-professional education opportunities/partnerships external the university for audiology administration/management practicums.

    A Critical Discourse Analysis of Essential Functions Through a Social Justice Lens (.15 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 4:00 PM - 4/9/2021 5:30 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Benjamin Munson, Ph.D., ASHA Fellow - Professor and Chair
      Benjamin Munson, Ph.D., is a Professor of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences at University of Minnesota. His research examines how people with and without communication disorders produce and perceive sociolinguistic variation related to gender, sexuality, and race.
    • Betty Yu, Ph.D. - Associate Professor
      Betty Yu is an Associate Professor in the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences at San Francisco State University. Her research focuses on how the development of communicative, linguistic and sociocultural competencies in children from linguistically minoritized communities, interface with dominant language ideologies, institutional practices/policies, and family socialization.
    • Brandi L. Newkirk-Turner, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor/Chairperson
      Brandi L. Newkirk-Turner, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an associate professor and chairperson in the Department of Communicative Disorders at Jackson State University. Her research examines multicultural issues that are relevant to speech-language assessment of nonmainstream dialect speakers and best practices for preparing graduate students to serve culturally and linguistically diverse populations.
    • Maria L. Muñoz, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Professor
      Maria L. Muñoz, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is a Professor at the University of Redlands. She received her doctorate from the University of Texas as a participant in the Multicultural Leadership Training Program. She conducts research, teaches, and publishes in the areas of treatment aphasia in Spanish/English bilinguals and multicultural issues in communication sciences and disorders.
    • RaMonda Horton, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Dr. RaMonda Horton, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is an Associate Professor in the Speech-language Pathology program at Midwestern University in Downers Grove, IL. Her research and teaching interests are in the areas of early language development, childhood communication disorders, social justice, and multicultural issues in communication sciences and disorders.
    • Reem Khamis-Dakwar, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Professor
      Dr. Khamis-Dakwar is Chair of the Communication Sciences and Disorders Department and a visiting scholar and collaborating investigator at the Neurocognition of Language Lab at Teachers College, Columbia University. Dr. Khamis-Dakwar’s research focuses on the neurocognitive representation of Arabic diglossia and informing its implication on clinical speech and language services.
    • Valerie Johnson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor & Program Director
      Valerie Johnson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an Assistant Professor and Program Director at Rutgers University. Her research and teaching interest are in eh area of child language development and its disorders, and multicultural issues in communication disorders.
    • Yvette D. Hyter, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, ASHA Fellow - Professor, Emerita
      Yvette D. Hyter, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, Professor Emerita of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences at Western Michigan University and an ASHA Fellow, has expertise in culturally responsive and globally sustainable practices and has a co-authored textbook on culturally responsive practices. Her areas of expertise include the influences of culture on communication development with emphasis in social pragmatic language of children with histories of maltreatment, and those who speak African American English.
    Summary
    The Essential Functions (EFs) are meant to standardize candidate qualifications within a field of study. Those set for speech, language, and hearing sciences have been rarely examined for potential pitfalls, even though they can result in discrimination. The presentation reports findings from a critical discourse analysis of the development and content of CAPCSD-recommended EFs from a social justice lens. Findings show that the EFs uphold narrow, rigid descriptions of the idealized speech-language pathologist that may exclude or disadvantage those with disabilities and BIPOC candidates. Recommendations will offer a strategic plan to develop anti-racist and anti-ableist academic environments.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Identify the underlying assumptions that CAPCSD's current essential functions convey to academic programs and professionals regarding the expected knowledge and skills required of prospective graduate students.
    • Recognize how the language in CAPCSD's current essential functions document may hinder the development of an equitable, innovative, and compassionate professional society of speech language pathologists and audiologists.
    • Discuss potential strategies towards developing anti-racist and anti-ableist academic environments.

    Community Engagement: How Can Our Clinics Support Our Community? (.15 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 4:00 PM - 4/9/2021 5:30 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Christie A. Needham, M.A., CCC-SLP - Director of Clinical Education, Department Chair, Associate Professor
      Christie A. Needham, M.A., CCC-SLP, is the Director of Clinical Education, Department Chair and an Associate Professor at Baldwin Wallace University. She earned her B.A. and M.A. from the University of Akron and has been supervising for over 20 years. She leads a thriving clinical education program that serves over 1000 patients during a normal semester. Her research is in clinical education, use of technology, and community engagement practices.
    Summary
    University Clinics have become vital parts of many communities. While the goal has often been on helping students meet clinical education needs, little focus has addressed meeting actual community needs. Understanding and working to address community needs may offer greater opportunities to expand student clinician experiences.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe the ideal composition of Advisory Committees to truly engage the local community.
    • List ways in which to identify community needs.
    • Develop strategies for gaining community partners and resources for implementing programs.

    Motivating Faculty (.15 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 4:00 PM - 4/9/2021 5:30 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Jessica Messersmith, Ph.D. - Department Chair, Clinic Director, Professor Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders Faculty Athletics Representative University of South Dakota
      Jessica J. Messersmith is Department Chair, Clinic Director, and Professor in the Communication Sciences and Disorders Department and the Faculty Athletics Representative for the University of South Dakota. Her research focuses on clinical practices that impact outcomes of pediatric cochlear implant users and infant hearing detection and intervention. Through her work she strives to improve access to care for pediatric patients in underserved, rural, and impoverished areas.
    Summary
    Are you feeling stagnant in your professional growth? This session will focus on helping colleagues feel valued, connected, and inspired, both professionally and personally. Discussion will also guide future leaders to formulate a plan for the next phase in their career.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Identify strategies for leadership development within themselves and within department faculty.
    • Identify three action items for personal growth.
    • Identify three action items for professional growth.

    Supporting Students, Clients and Colleagues Who Identify as LGBTQIA+ (.15 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 4:00 PM - 4/9/2021 5:30 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Aaron Rothbart, M.S., CCC-SLP - Doctoral Student/Clinical Supervisor
      Aaron Rothbart, a doctoral student at the University of Oregon, has worked in a variety of medical settings and as a lead clinical researcher. He served on several district advisory boards and as a member of the ASHA TBI Topic Committee. Aaron has presented at the state and national levels.
    • David Bayne, M.S., CCC-SLP - Doctoral Student/Clinical Supervisor
      David is a doctoral student with a clinical and research interest in dysphagia as seen in progressive neurological diseases. His goal is to foster a deeper understanding of the biopsychosocial impacts of feeding-related behaviors and how to harness these therapeutically to promote healthy mealtime interactions.
    • Jennifer Meyer, M.S., CCC-SLP - Director of Clinical Education
      Jennifer is the Director of Clinical Education at the University of Oregon working with diverse students, clients & colleagues. Jennifer actively engages in social justice/advocacy work in her workplace and community, serving on the College of Education Equity and Inclusion Committee and the Lane County Equity and Access Advisory Board.
    • Sloan Jayme, M.S., CCC-SLP - Medical Externship Coordinator
      Jayme Sloan, M.S., CCC-SLP, is a clinical supervisor and is the medical externship coordinator for the University of Oregon Communication Disorders and Sciences Program. Prior to starting at the University, Jayme primarily worked in Skilled Nursing Facilities but also has experience in Home Health and Private Practice. She enjoys mentoring graduate students and treating clients with language, motor speech, and swallowing impairments.
    Summary
    Addressing the needs of LGBTQIA+ clients, students and colleagues is an essential component of culturally competent assessment, treatment, student training, supervision and professional collegiality. This presentation aims to increase cultural competence and empower allies within the speech-language pathology community to create more inclusive and safe clinical environments for students, clients and colleagues. Through understanding accepted terminology and the risks and challenges faced by the LGBTQIA+ community, combined with activities of self-reflection and discussion of ways to create an accepting environment, attendees will increase their capacity to be strong allies and incite culture change in CDS programs from undergraduate through Ph.D.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Define ten commonly accepted terms used within the LGBTQIA+ community.
    • Integrate knowledge of three risks/challenges faced by LGBTQIA+ individuals into strategic planning to promote equity and inclusion.
    • Describe four ways to demonstrate alliance with students and colleagues who identify as LGBTQIA+.

    The Third Space: Delivering a Truly Hybrid Didactic and Clinical CSD Education (.15 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 4:00 PM - 4/9/2021 5:30 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Maya Reynolds Clark, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor and Program Director
      Maya Reynolds Clark, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an associate professor and program director for Communication Sciences and Disorders at Georgia Southern University. As director of the LEADS lab, she focuses on cultural factors in communication and cognition, implicit bias, social cognitive theory and clinical education. As an Office of Inclusive Excellence Faculty Fellow, Dr. Clark is dedicated to using her expertise to assist families from diverse cultures and marginalized backgrounds.
    Summary
    The goal of graduate programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) is to train Clinical Fellowship-Ready clinicians who are prepared to competently provide services to individuals with communication and swallowing difficulties. In order to do so, graduate programs must integrate theoretical and evidence-based knowledge with clinical practice. Integrated Clinical Education (ICE) is a curriculum design model whereby clinical education experiences are purposely organized within a curriculum. This session will discuss the often inadvertent dichotomy between academic and clinical educators as well as the use of ICE models to create a truly hybrid or Third Space Theory approach to educating students.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Discuss the need for authentic alignment of clinical learning objectives with didactic content delivery across the curriculum.
    • Define Integrated Clinical Education (ICE).
    • Identify current models for the Integration of Academic and Clinical Education.

    ** Not Attending a Session During this Time Slot

    4/9/2021 4:00 PM - 4/9/2021 5:30 PM ET

    REPEAT - The Introvert’s Guide to Academic Leadership (.15 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 5:30 PM - 4/9/2021 7:00 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Jeff Buller, Ph.D. - Senior Partner
      Jeffrey L. Buller is a senior partner in ATLAS: Academic Training, Leadership, and Assessment Services, having served in administrative positions ranging from department chair to vice president for academic affairs at four institutions: Loras College, Georgia Southern University, Mary Baldwin College, and Florida Atlantic University. He is the author of 23 books on education leadership, a textbook for first-year college students, a book of opera essays, and several novels.
    Summary
    Repeat of 8:00 a.m. ET session

    Most leadership books and management courses are designed for extraverts. In fact, many of the practices commonly regarded as “effective leadership” (complete accessibility, ease, and graciousness in social situations, the willingness to take calculated risks) come far more naturally to extraverts than to introverts. But well more than half of the people who choose an academic career are introverts. How can they be effective as leaders? This workshop explores how introverts can build on their strengths, compensate for their weaknesses, and balance their leadership teams so as to achieve more of their high-priority goals.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Build on their own strengths as introverts.
    • Compensate for or overcome their weaknesses as introverts.
    • Create a more balanced leadership team.

    REPEAT - Effective Hearing Competencies Obtained Through Simulated Patients for SLP Students (.10 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 5:30 PM - 4/9/2021 7:00 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Saneta Thurmon, M.A., CCC-SLP/A - Program Director, Assistant Professor
      Saneta Thurmon, M.A., CCC-SLP/A, is the director of the Undergraduate Program of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Saint Louis University (SLU). She has dual certification in both Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology. She has devoted her career to Aural Rehabilitation/Habilitation and clinical supervision. She currently teaches several courses at SLU, which include: Clinical Methods, Clinical Observation, Counseling, Clinical Practicum, Research Seminar, and Aural Rehabilitation. She is an assistant professor at SLU.
    Summary
    Repeat of 8:00 a.m. ET session

    Are your SLP graduate students competent and confident when providing services to clients who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing? This session discusses two clinical education learning models where SLP graduate students were assigned a semester with in-person aural rehabilitation patients compared to simulated aural rehabilitation patients. Student survey results completed by cohorts of students will be shared to identify learning outcomes and clinical competencies from both experiences. This session will review the reflective supervision model which allows the clinical process to be viewed from various perspectives and encourages best clinical practices in the clinical process.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe how Aural Rehabilitation /Audiology Simucase patients can provide hearing competencies and meaningful IPE experiences for SLP graduate students.
    • Review student surveys of student reflections of experiences with in-person aural rehabilitation clinical experiences to simulated aural rehabilitation patient experiences.
    • Describe research demonstrating the need for future SLPs to be able to write goals for Deaf and Hard of Hearing patients as well as basic troubleshooting of HAs, and CIs.

    REPEAT - Role of Personal Wellness in Preventing Student (and Faculty) Burn-out (.15 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 5:30 PM - 4/9/2021 7:00 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Jamie Kulzer, Ph.D., CRC, LPC - Assistant Professor
      Jamie Kulzer, Ph.D., CRC, LPC, is an Assistant Professor at the University of Pittsburgh in the Clinical Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling program. Dr. Kulzer teaches, mentors, and provides clinical supervision to Masters-level students. In addition, Dr. Kulzer is the Project Director/Principal Investigator of an Intergovernmental Agency Agreement (IAA) that provides programs of assistive technology, cognitive rehabilitation, and rehabilitation psychology at a state-run vocational rehabilitation facility.
    • Laura J. Dietz, Ph.D. - Associate Professor
      Laura J Dietz, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor at the University of Pittsburgh in the School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences, where she teaches graduate students in the Clinical Rehabilitation & Mental Health Counseling program. She is a clinical and developmental psychologist whose research focuses on risk factors for depression and psychosocial interventions for mood disorders. Dr Dietz has developed and tested curriculum for promoting mental wellness in graduate students.
    Summary
    Repeat of 8:00 a.m. ET session

    This workshop will describe a personalized education program for graduate student wellness piloted at the University of Pittsburgh’s School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences (SHRS). The Pitt Wellness Program includes psychoeducation on creating a self-care plan, relaxation and stress management skills, and building support networks during graduate training. Data on program satisfaction, self-care strategies, coping skills, stress, behavioral health concerns, and sense of belonging in their programs will be presented. The Pitt Personal Wellness program will provide faculty with a curriculum that can be used to increase self-care in graduate students (and faculty) in the communication science disorders fields.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe the role of self-care and wellness in preventing professional burnout in graduate students/trainees.
    • Develop a personalized self-care plan that incorporates diversified personal wellness strategies into weekly routines.
    • Construct a curricular component that provides mentorship on stress management and self-care strategies for graduate students/trainees.

    REPEAT - The Value of an Undergraduate CSD Education (.15 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 5:30 PM - 4/9/2021 7:00 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Tonya Bergeson, Ph.D. - Associate Professor and Chair
      Tonya Bergeson, Ph.D., is associate professor and chair of communication sciences and disorders at Butler University. She earned undergraduate degrees in psychology and music at Northwestern University and graduate degrees in psychology at University of Toronto. She has published research in language development, audiovisual perception, and music perception in infants to adults with and without hearing loss. Dr. Bergeson has been awarded several grants, including the National Institutes of Health.
    Summary
    Repeat of 8:00 a.m. ET session

    Due to a changing landscape in higher education, public universities must now demonstrate how undergraduate students are prepared for the job market. In CSD we graduate more UG students than can be admitted to our graduate programs, amplifying the need for CSD programs to assist students’ understanding of marketable skills. This session will explore how undergraduate CSD programs can help develop skills that are valuable both for graduate CSD programs as well as employers outside of CSD.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Identify marketable skills in undergraduate CSD programs.
    • Develop/provide unique preparation to help students ‘stand out’ for non-CSD job and educational opportunities.
    • Explore student characteristics valuable both to graduate CSD programs and to potential non-CSD employers.

    REPEAT - Transforming Courses to Be More Inclusive (.15 CEUs)

    4/9/2021 5:30 PM - 4/9/2021 7:00 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Tommie L. Robinson, Jr., Ph.D. - Chief/Associate Professor
      Tommie L. Robinson, Jr., Ph.D., is chief of the division of Hearing and Speech and director of the Scottish Rite Center for Communication Disorders at Children’s National Hospital in Washington, D.C. He is associate professor of pediatrics at The George Washington, University School of Medicine and HealthSciences. Dr. Robinson’s research and writings have focused on normal fluency behaviors in children, patient safety, and service delivery to children from diverse backgrounds.
    Summary
    Repeat of 8:00 a.m. ET session

    This session will address the components necessary to make course instruction more inclusive for all learners. Successful strategies for modifying the courses and facilitating an inclusive environment will be discussed.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Identify gaps necessary to facilitate a change towards a more inclusive learning environment.
    • Describe two ways to modify course syllabi to address inclusivity.
    • Determine two additional ways to improve the learning environment for all students.

    ** Not Attending a Session During this Time Slot

    4/9/2021 5:30 PM - 4/9/2021 7:00 PM ET

    Admission to Graduate School; Evidence for Use of GRE, GPA, Written Essays (.10 CEUs)

    4/10/2021 10:00 AM - 4/10/2021 11:30 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Larry A. Boles, Ph.D., CCC - Program Director
      Larry Boles is a professor at the University of the Pacific, a CSDCAS user since 2011, and on the CSDCAS Advisory Board since 2014. His research focuses on aphasia couples therapy, and graduate admissions. He has published in 11 national and international journals and presented in the US, and several other countries.
    Summary
    Admission to graduate school is a high priority for many programs. Lately, the GRE has been a “favorite target”—that is, that minorities do more poorly on the GRE. A statistical analysis will show that our students of color do as well on the GRE (and GPA) as white students. Further, regression analysis will demonstrate the variables that predict favorable outcomes for all students (and separately for minorities). Outcome will be defined in terms of academic and clinical skills. As important as this is, the variables that do NOT predict favorable outcomes will also be presented.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Determine the variables that best fit their program’s priorities for admission.
    • Separate desirable characteristics from those characteristics that actually predict positive outcome.
    • Determine those characteristics that determine outcome for people of color (whether that is the same or different from white applicants).

    Transforming Culture Through the Education for Clinical Interprofessional Simulation Excellence (EClIPSE) Program (.10 CEUs)

    4/10/2021 10:00 AM - 4/10/2021 11:30 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Erin Thomas, PT, DPT - Clinical Assistant Professor
      Erin Thomas, PT, DPT, is a Clinical Assistant Professor and co-assistant Director of Clinical Education within the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, division of Physical Therapy, at The Ohio State University. She is a founding member of the Eclipse Group (Education for Clinical Interprofessional Simulation Excellence) and serves as the interprofessional coordinator for the physical therapy division. She has presented nationally and internationally on simulation as a teaching tool.
    • Janice Wilcox, DNP, RN, CNL - Nurse Educator/Assistant Professor of Clinical Practice
      Janice Wilcox, DNP, RN, CNL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Practice and Director of the Clinical Nurse Leader Graduate Specialty at The Ohio State University College of Nursing. Nurse Educator for the OSUWMC James Comprehensive Cancer Center.
    • Jennifer M. Brello, M.Ed., CCC-SLP - Clinical Associate Professor
      Jennifer Brello, M.Ed., CCC-SLP, is a Clinical Associate Professor at the Ohio State University and the Director of the OSU Aphasia Initiative. She is a clinical supervisor, course instructor, and academic advisor. She has over 20 years of experience supporting adults who have experienced acquired brain injury. Jennifer's clinical and research interests are in supportive communication and service-learning.
    • Nicole Wiksten, M.S., CCC-SLP, BCS-S - Clinical Assistant Professor
      Nicole Wiksten, M.S., CCC-SLP, BCS-S, is a Clinical Assistant Professor at The Ohio State University, board-certified in swallowing, provides graduate clinical education in the area of adult medical Speech-Language Pathology, teaches the swallowing curriculum and works clinically in acute care at OSU. She has extensive adult medical clinical experience, performing FEES and MBSS, encompassing a variety of populations and given presentations at the local, state and national levels.
    Summary
    Safe and effective healthcare requires the collaborative effort of numerous healthcare professionals, yet this need is not consistently addressed during student professional training. The Education for Clinical Interprofessional Simulation Excellence (EClIPSE) program at the Ohio State University provides the opportunity to optimize teamwork experiences during a crucial time in students’ professional development. EClIPSE, an IP simulation program, incorporates team rounding and collaborative patient-centered care for complex patients in a safe and controlled environment. Program evaluation data will be presented along with methods for transitioning the interprofessional experience to an online platform in response to the COVID crisis.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Discuss a framework for an interprofessional patient simulation program.
    • Describe methods for evaluating the effectiveness of interprofessional simulation experiences.
    • Describe methods for completing online interprofessional simulation experiences for students in healthcare professional programs.

    A Vision for Anti-racism in CSD Academic Programs (.15 CEUs)

    4/10/2021 10:00 AM - 4/10/2021 11:30 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Vicki R. Deal-Williams, M.A., CCC-SLP, FASAE, CAE - Chief Staff Officer for Multicultural Affairs
      Vicki R. Deal-Williams, M.A., CCC-SLP, FASAE, CAE, is ASHA’s Chief Staff Officer for Multicultural Affairs. She is an ASHA-certified speech-language pathologist, working in diversity and inclusion, Association leadership, and strategic planning for over 35 years. Vicki is a Fellow of ASHA and the American Society of Association Executives and received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees at Northwestern University.
    Summary
    Faculty and administrators responsible for training the next generation of Audiologists and SLPs can no longer ignore race and its influence in the classroom and clinic. They’ll play a critical role in achieving the desired future state for CSD related to diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI), and it will be their responsibility to implement changes to curriculum, pedagogy, student learning outcomes, faculty development, etc., that will help achieve the benefits of DEI within the discipline. A potential future, the requirements in academe, and potential strategies, tools, and resources for employing anti-racist practices and approaches will be offered.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe the desired future state of CSD as it relates to diversity, equity, and inclusion.
    • Describe the case for exemplifying and teaching anti-racist approaches in CSD.
    • Identify anti-racist practices and approaches that can be applied in CSD academic programs.

    Clinical Educator e-Learning Courses - Refreshed and Relaunched! (.15 CEUs)

    4/10/2021 10:00 AM - 4/10/2021 11:30 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Andrew Clare, M.S., CCC-SLP, CBIS - Committee Member
      Andy Clare M.S., CCC-SLP, CBIS, is a Clinical Educator at the GWU Department of Speech & Hearing Sciences. His clinical areas of expertise include Dysphagia, Aphasia and Cognitive-Linguistic Disorders. His current research interests focus on refining clinical education processes for students and supervisors in Speech-Language Pathology.
    • Carol Cokely, Ph.D. - Audiology Program Head
      Dr. Carol Cokely is a Clinical Professor and the Director of Clinical Education in audiology at the University of Texas at Dallas. She earned a bachelor’s degree from Queens College of the City University of New York, a master’s degree from Northwestern University, and her Ph.D. from Indiana University. Research and project development interests include clinical education assessment and outcomes.
    • Elaine Mormer, Ph.D., CCC-A - Associate Professor
      Elaine Mormer is Associate Professor and Vice Chair for Clinical Education in the University of Pittsburgh CSD department. Dr. Mormer serves on the CAPCSD Board of Directors as Vice President for Clinical Education Resource Development. Dr. Mormer was a 2019 co-recipient of the University of Pittsburgh Innovation in Education Award and the 2020 American Academy of Audiology Outstanding Educator Award.
    • Kevin M. McNamara, M.A., CCC-SLP, ASHA Fellow - Clinical Director Emeritus
      Kevin M. McNamara, M.A., CCC-SLP, ASHA Fellow, is Clinical Director Emeritus in the Department of Communication Disorders at Southern Connecticut State University. He has presented workshops and research on clinical education, had served on the 2016 ASHA Ad Hoc Committee on Supervision Training, and serves as Chair of the CAPCSD Clinical Educator Resources Committee.
    • Lee A. Robinson, M.S., CCC-SLP - Clinic Director, Associate Clinical Professor
      Professor Lee Robinson, M.S., CCC-SLP is an Associate Clinical Professor and Clinic Director at Brigham Young University. Professor Robinson has supervised numerous first-year graduate student clinicians. She has also served as the Internship Coordinator, successfully placing students at pediatric and adult settings. Professor Robinson has numerous publications and presentations on supervision, Theory of Mind, social communication and teaching clinical writing.
    • Tammy Fredrickson, Ph.D., CCC-A - Director of Audiology Clinical Education
      Tammy Fredrickson, Ph.D., CCC-A, works with AuD students both as a clinical preceptor at the University of Colorado Hospital Department of Hearing and Balance and as Director of Clinical Audiology Education at the University of Colorado Boulder. Her primary interests include pediatric audiology and precepting students.
    Summary
    The CAPCSD Clinical Educator eLearning Courses are alive and well! In this presentation, we will describe our four recently relaunched eLearning courses, including updates to courses one and two (Foundations of Clinical Education; Effective Student-Clinical Educator Relationships), and new offerings in courses three and four (Feedback in the Clinical Education Environment; Assessing Student Performance). You will receive helpful hints for engaging the courses in their newly revised format, and instructions for accessing a repository of course materials and promotional tools you can use for additional training and course promotion to CAPCSD-affiliated clinical educators.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe the key instructional content of the four CAPCSD Clinical Educator eLearning courses.
    • Identify the procedures for enrolling in CAPCSD Clinical Educator eLearning courses, navigating content, and accessing a repository of course materials and promotional tools that can be used for additional training and course promotion to CAPCSD-affiliated clinical educators.
    • Develop a strategy for promoting and disseminating CAPCSD Clinical Educator Training eLearning courses to support the skill development of clinical educators affiliated with CAPCSD programs.

    Global Models in Tele-audiology (.15 CEUs)

    4/10/2021 10:00 AM - 4/10/2021 11:30 AM ET

    Speakers
    • De Wet Swanepoel, Ph.D. - Professor of Audiology
      De Wet Swanepoel, Ph.D., is Professor of Audiology at the University of Pretoria, South Africa. His research capitalizes on information and communication technologies to explore, develop and evaluate innovative solutions and service-delivery models for improved access to ear and hearing care. He is Editor-in-chief of the International Journal of Audiology, past-president of the International Society of Audiology. He is also a founder and scientific advisor to the hearX group.
    Summary
    Globally, audiologic telepractice services have been embraced. However, in the U.S. impediments in the pedagogical, licensure and reimbursement aspects have caused delays in implementation. Exploration of various approaches will be essential for practitioners in the U.S. to expand telepractice.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe two models of telepractice for audiology.
    • Identify potential barriers for local implementation.
    • Develop a plan of action for telepractice implementation.

    The "New Normal" for Clinical Education: Telesupervision (.15 CEUs)

    4/10/2021 10:00 AM - 4/10/2021 11:30 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Carol Szymanski, Ph.D. - Speech-Language Pathologist
      Carol Szymanski, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is a speech-language pathologist providing therapeutic services to adolescents with severe communication disorders for SPEED Special Education Cooperative. She has extensive experience in both academic teaching and clinical supervision of graduate students in speech-language pathology programs, and is currently supervising graduate students for Simucase through telesupervision.
    Summary
    Telepractice has become a part of almost every clinician's responsibilities at this point in time. For university training programs, this means providing clinical practica and supervision for students in new and innovative ways. Telesupervision has become a new vehicle by which students and Clinical Fellows can engage with their preceptors. While telesupervision allows for easier access to remote supervision, it does come with a set of supervision challenges. This session will discuss telesupervision in practice, and how to apply what we already know about good supervision to this new means of mentoring student clinicians.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Identify state and ASHA guidelines related to telesupervision.
    • Describe possible advantages, barriers, and challenges to providing telesupervision.
    • Explain differences in providing supervision in face-to-face versus 'tele' formats.

    Work-Life Balance (.15 CEUs)

    4/10/2021 10:00 AM - 4/10/2021 11:30 AM ET

    Speakers
    • Jeff L. Buller, Ph.D. - Senior Partner
      Jeffrey L. Buller is a senior partner in ATLAS: Academic Training, Leadership, and Assessment Services, having served in administrative positions ranging from department chair to vice president for academic affairs at four institutions: Loras College, Georgia Southern University, Mary Baldwin College, and Florida Atlantic University. He is the author of 23 books on education leadership, a textbook for first-year college students, a book of opera essays, and several novels.
    Summary
    Even more than in other professions, it’s easy for the work of a college professor or administrator to become all-encompassing. There’s always more we can do to prepare for class, advance our research, serve our clients, or respond to (endless) emails. We all long for work-life balance, but what is it really? In this highly interactive workshop, we’ll identify each participant’s current state of work-life balance and then develop a plan that will help the participant achieve the level of work-life balance that he or she desires.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Identify current areas of work-life imbalance.
    • Apply proven techniques to help restore work-life balance.
    • Deal with the added pressures of conversion to an online-only or hybrid environment.

    ** Not Attending a Session During this Time Slot

    4/10/2021 10:00 AM - 4/10/2021 11:30 AM ET

    Examining Essential Functions Through the Lens of Diversity and Inclusion (.10 CEUs)

    4/10/2021 11:35 AM - 4/10/2021 1:05 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Pamela Hart, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Department Chair and Professor
      Pam Hart, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is Department Chair and Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Rockhurst University. Dr. Hart has worked in higher education since completing her Ph.D. in 2003. She teaches courses in her primary interest areas of AAC and child language and conducts research in a variety of AAC, SOTL, and child language related areas.
    • Shatonda S. Jones, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, CBIST - Associate Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders & Faculty Senate Chair-Elect
      Shatonda S. Jones, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, CBIST, is an Associate Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) at Rockhurst University. Her research centers on health capacity building in communities of color, SOTL, diffusion of health information, edutainment, and CLD issues in CSD. She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in adult neurogenics. She has more than a decade of clinical experience working primarily with adults with neurogenic communication and swallowing disorders.
    Summary
    Essential functions documents have been widely implemented in communication sciences and disorders programs to protect clients by limiting program admission to students who perceive themselves to have adequate physical, behavioral, social, and intellectual capacities for the professions. In most instances, once admitted, students must exhibit these capacities or risk dismissal from the program. Our study explored relationships between student perceptions of their cultural identity and their perceived abilities to meet essential functions. Results and implications for supporting diversity and inclusion within CSD will be presented. Suggestions for using essential functions while still supporting socially marginalized students will be emphasized.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Discuss the literature regarding essential functions and their utility in graduate education.
    • Name specific ways in which to limit bias in essential functions documents.
    • Describe barriers to recruitment and retention of students from historically socially marginalized groups.

    Pivoting to Virtual Clinical Learning: COVID-19 Strengthens an Interfacility Partnership (.10 CEUs)

    4/10/2021 11:35 AM - 4/10/2021 1:05 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Erin EG. Lundblom, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor & Clinical Education Coordinator for Speech-Language Pathology
      Erin E.G. Lundblom is an Associate Professor and Clinical Education Coordinator for Speech-Language Pathology at the University of Pittsburgh, where she provides course instruction to both undergraduate and graduate students. Her areas of interest encompass best practice in the provision of clinical services, school-based language and literacy services including service delivery options, and higher education pedagogy.
    • Geoffrey Fredericks, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Speech-Language Pathologist
      Geoffrey Fredericks, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is a staff Speech-Language Pathologist with the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System and serves as an Adjunct Assistant Professor for the University of Pittsburgh in the Department of Communication Science and Disorders. He provides clinical education with a focus on Neurogenic Communication Disorders, specifically Speech Motor Disorders.
    • Kimberly Ann Eichhorn, M.S., CCC-SLP, BC-ANCDS, ATP - Speech-Language Pathologist
      Kimberly Eichhorn, M.S., CCC-SLP, BC-ANCDS, ATP, is the Program Supervisor of the Speech-Language Pathology Department at the VA Pittsburgh HealthCare System. She serves as a clinical instructor for the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders for the University of Pittsburgh. Her areas of interest include cognitive-communication disorders and assistive technology.
    • Laura Appelbaum, M.A., CCC-SLP - Speech-Language Pathologist
      Laura Appelbaum, M.A., CCC-SLP, is a full-time staff Speech-Language Pathologist with the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System and provides clinical education and training for graduate level students at the University of Pittsburgh. Her areas of interest include head and neck cancer, surgical airways, and instrumental evaluation of dysphagia and management.
    • Rebecca Ruffing, M.A., CCC-SLP - Speech-Language Pathologist
      Rebecca Ruffing, M.A., CCC-SLP, is a full-time Speech-Language Pathologist at the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System and serves as a clinical educator for graduate students from the University of Pittsburgh and Duquesne University. Areas of clinical specialization include neurogenic communication disorders and ethical considerations for dysphagia management at end of life.
    • Ronda Winans-Mitrik, M.A., CCC-SLP - Speech-Language Pathologist
      Ronda Winans-Mitrik, M.A., CCC-SLP is a full-time Speech-Language Pathologist at the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System and serves as a clinical educator for the University of Pittsburgh in the Department of Communication Science and Disorders. She is known for providing individualized care to patients with surgical airways and aphasia and has authored and delivered multiple presentations pertaining to these topics.
    Summary
    Frameworks for virtual learning in speech pathology have been developed (Hewat, 2020; Carter, 2018) but with limited historic utilization. The impact of COVID-19 supported a transition from on-site clinical education to virtual learning for a cohort of graduate-level students. Across 4-week rotations, students participated in case-based education. Students received individualized mentoring to develop clinical competencies with application across a range of patient populations and disorders. These authentic clinical cases were developed with scaffolded instruction provided by expert clinicians, who bridged the gap between academic and clinical learning. Students reported high satisfaction. Preliminary outcome and social validity data will be presented.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe current frameworks for speech pathology virtual learning in the peer-reviewed literature.
    • Describe the University of Pittsburgh and VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System’s collaborative model for authentic case-based virtual learning.
    • Identify student-reported factors that influence virtual clinical skill development.

    An Innovative Look at Assessment and Evaluation of Clinical Educators (.15 CEUs)

    4/10/2021 11:35 AM - 4/10/2021 1:05 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Barbara Zucker M.A., CCC-SLP - Adjunct Instructor
      Barbara Zucker M.A., CCC-SLP, is an adjunct instructor in the Department of Speech-Language Pathology at Nova Southeastern University. She teaches courses, supports students in clinical practicum, and conducts site visits with students and off campus supervisors. She is a graduate of ASHA’s Leadership Development Program and is the Coordinator for ASHA’s Special Interest Group in Administration and Supervision (SIG 11) Coordinating Committee.
    • Melissa Edrich, Ed.D., CCC/SLP - Department Chair
      Melissa Edrich, Ed.D., CCC/SLP, is an associate professor and Department Chair/Director of the Master of Science Program in Speech-Language Pathology at Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Melissa has been an active participant in FLASHA for the past 25 years and served as President 2010-2011. Melissa also served a three-year term on the ASHA SLP Advisory Council 2015-2018 and is currently a member of the SIG 11 coordinating committee.
    Summary
    The regular evaluation of faculty is paramount for career advancement and program success. The challenge lies in that the role of clinical faculty does not always fit the traditional methods of faculty review. Clear and objective measurements of essential skills needed by clinical educators will help programs demonstrate how standards are met in a systematic manner, without bias or error. Different methods will be discussed, as well as a suggested combination of tools to assess and evaluate clinical educators in a manner that promotes growth, respect, and improvement in the process for themselves and for those they are educating.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Identify the role and purpose of three types of assessment and evaluation tools that may be used for annual review and promotion.
    • Discuss challenges related to the evaluation of clinical educators.
    • Develop a list of strategies/tools to make the evaluation of clinical educators functional, objective, and valuable.

    Diving into the CSDCAS Data: Benefits to Programs, Universities, and the Profession (.15 CEUs)

    4/10/2021 11:35 AM - 4/10/2021 1:05 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Douglas F. Parham, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Chair and Program Director
      Douglas F. Parham, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is the Chair and Program Director of the Department of CSD at Wichita State University. He is the Kansas representative on ASHA's Speech-Language Pathology Advisory Council and a Site Visitor for ASHA's Council on Academic Accreditation. He is a member of CAPCSD's CSDCAS Committee. He is a Past President of the Kansas Speech-Language-Hearing Association and the Council of State Speech-Language-Hearing Association Presidents.
    • Laura Plexico, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Chair
      Laura Plexico, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is a Professor and Chair in the Communication Disorders Department at Auburn University. She teaches courses in fluency disorders, counseling, and speech science. Her research concentrates on psychosocial aspects of stuttering, communicative interaction, and the processes of personal change.
    • Rachel M. Theodore, Ph.D. - Associate Professor
      Dr. Rachel M. Theodore is Associate Professor of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences at the University of Connecticut. She is also Director of the Neurobiology of Language graduate training program at the University of Connecticut and Research Affiliate at the Connecticut Institute for the Brain and Cognitive Sciences.
    • Steffany M. Chleboun, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Steffany M. Chleboun, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an Associate Professor and Graduate Program Director at Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville. She has taught both graduate and undergraduate courses. Her research interests include working with individuals living with acquired brain injury and aphasia. She has worked in the hospital setting as a speech-language pathologist and has experience working with adults and children with a variety of acquired communication disorders.
    Summary
    With approximately 70% of SLP and AuD programs participating, the data set from the centralized application service (CSDCAS) allows us to compile statistics on applicant numbers, matriculation, and profile (e.g., ethnicity, geographic, and economic demographics). Understanding the nature of our applicant pools and enrollment outcomes is critical to recruitment strategies, developing projections for the future of our field, and the health of individual professional programs. In this session, we will explore and interpret national data, provide hands-on demonstrations for running data reports at the program level, and discuss how these data might be used in admissions decisions, planning, and development.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Run WebAdMIT reports on their applicant pool.
    • Describe recent national trends in SLP and AuD applicant data.
    • Explain the benefits of a larger pool of programs using CSDCAS to the field at large.

    It's About Power: The Power Imbalance of "isms" in Society (.15 CEUs)

    4/10/2021 11:35 AM - 4/10/2021 1:05 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Janice M. Wright, M.A. CCCSLP - Assistant Clinical Professor
      Janice M. Wright M.A., CCC-SLP, is the Director of Clinical Education for Speech Pathology and an Assistant Clinical Professor for Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. She is a certified trainer for the Ohio Violence Prevention Program and the Ohio University Diversity Essentials Program. Janice has presented both nationally and internationally on the topics of supervision, pediatric feeding and multicultural issues in addition to publishing articles on these topics.
    Summary
    There are differences - differences in gender, racial and ethnic heritage, age, physical ability, economic class, sexual orientation, communication style and many others. Some of these differences are visible, some we pretend not to see. The truth about these differences is that they are used to separate people along lines of power. Language itself, is an instrument of power and is often used to control others. This session will explore the power differences focusing on the key concepts of power and nonpower groups, oppression, internalized oppression and alliance building by unlearning the 'isms' that exist in society.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Identify individual biases and their influence on power and nonpower groups, oppression, internalized oppression and alliance building.
    • Recognize biases and the imbalance of power within our academic programs.
    • State two action items to address these biases and unlearn the 'isms' that impact our society.

    Supporting LGBTQIA+ People in CSD Education: Including Intersectionality in the Conversation (.15 CEUs)

    4/10/2021 11:35 AM - 4/10/2021 1:05 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Derek E. Daniels, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies
      Derek E. Daniels, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an associate professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Wayne State University. He provides clinical services for people who stutter and supervises graduate student training in stuttering. Dr. Daniels' research focuses on public perceptions of people who stutter, identity construction, psychosocial experiences, and intersectionality. In March 2021, he will serve as President of the Michigan Speech, Language, and Hearing Association.
    • Gregory C. Robinson, Ph.D. CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Gregory C. Robinson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, (they/them) is an Associate Professor at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. They are the chair of L'GASP: The LGBTQIA+ Caucus of ASHA, the director of the UAMS Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology Ph.D. Program, the founder and director of the TLC: Gender Affirming Communication Therapy Group, and the Speech-Language Pathology Discipline Coordinator for the Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities Grant.
    Summary
    Supporting marginalized groups in our academic programs is necessary to a successful, inclusive learning environment . This session will build upon information provided to members from the CAPCSD webinar on LGBTQIA+ held in September 2020. Models for creating an inclusive environment will be shared.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Identify issues that commonly occur in higher education with LGBTQIA+ students, faculty, clients, and families who experience multiple stigmas.
    • Define terminology associated with LGBTQIA+ populations.
    • Provide solutions to problem-based learning scenarios commonly experienced by LGBTQIA+ populations.

    Motherhood in Our Academy: Results of a National Survey (.10 CEUs)

    4/10/2021 11:35 AM - 4/10/2021 1:05 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Amanda Stead, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      Amanda Stead, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an associate professor at Pacific University in Oregon. She teaches courses in Communication and Aging, Aphasia, Progressive Neurological Disorders, and Counseling. Her research is in the area of language change in healthy aging and dementia evidenced based education, and end-of-life care.
    • Kerry C. Mandulak, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      As Chair of Graduate Admissions in the Pacific University School of Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD), Kerry Callahan Mandulak, Associate Professor, has seen firsthand the power of using holistic review processes to increase the diversity of the speech-language pathology and audiology workforce. She has served as member and past Chair of the CSDCAS Committee. Through her research and speaking opportunities, Dr. Mandulak continues the national conversation around this important work.
    Summary
    Research has repeatedly shown that having children negatively affects mothers’ academic careers. As scholar-mothers advance, they suffer from lower degree completion, reduced financial compensation, reduced promotion rates, and higher rates of attrition. This leaky pipeline is a significant loss of economic investment and talent within our field. To investigate these trends, specifically within the disciplines of speech pathology and audiology, a national survey was conducted of our academic mothers. This survey revealed significant barriers in scholar-mothers achieving work-family balance and academic success. This session provides the opportunity to explore results of the national survey and discuss evidence-based solutions for change.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Explain the evidence related to the “Baby Penalty.”
    • Discuss the results of a national survey of academic mothers in communication sciences and disorders.
    • Identify ways to alter the current landscape for scholar-mothers using evidence-based strategies.

    ** Not Attending a Session During this Time Slot

    4/10/2021 11:35 AM - 4/10/2021 1:05 PM ET

    Career Ladder for Administrators (.10 CEUs)

    4/10/2021 1:15 PM - 4/10/2021 2:15 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Julie J. Masterson, Ph.D. - Associate Provost, Dean of the Graduate College and Professor of CSD
      Julie Masterson is Associate Provost-Dean of the Graduate College at Missouri State University. She is Chair of the Midwest Association of Graduate Schools. She was a trustee for the ASHF and on the national advisory committee for GradCAS. Julie received the Honors of the Association from ASHA in 2015, from CAPCSD in 2018, and was named one the region’s Most Influential Women by Springfield Business Journal in 2017.
    Summary
    Career paths in higher education are often not obvious nor well defined. CSD leadership positions are catalysts for other leadership positions. This session will provide insight for opportunities beyond CSD.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Identify possible career paths within higher education.
    • Determine resources and support necessary for advancement.
    • List the components of your leadership philosophy.

    Enhancing Student Engagement in the Remote Learning Environment (.10 CEUs)

    4/10/2021 1:15 PM - 4/10/2021 2:15 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Bonnie K. Slavych, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Assistant Professor
      Bonnie K. Slavych, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, ACUE is an assistant professor with the University of Central Missouri. Dr. Slavych teaches graduate courses in voice disorders, swallowing disorders, and research design as well as undergraduate courses in neuroscience and evidence-based practice. She has published research in the areas of patient-reported outcome measures, readability, and course design.
    Summary
    Student ratings following emergency transition to online instruction reveal a decline in satisfaction with overall learning. Factors highlighted as contributing to the decline include the loss of authentic, hands-on experiences; self-motivation; and accessibility. Indeed, many instructors have expressed concerns that moving to virtual instruction has, in part, diminished the quality of instruction and created an impersonal environment. This session will discuss instructional methodologies implemented within a Communication Disorders course that transitioned from face-to-face to an online learning environment. Instructor and student perceptions specific to the instructional methodologies will be presented and tools for monitoring student engagement will be discussed.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Discuss best practices in online teaching.
    • Design an engaging learning experience for the virtual environment.
    • Articulate methods for measuring student engagement in the virtual environment.

    Framework for Evaluating and Vetting Off-campus Placements (.10 CEUs)

    4/10/2021 1:15 PM - 4/10/2021 2:15 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Erin EG. Lundblom, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor & Clinical Education Coordinator for Speech-Language Pathology
      Erin E.G. Lundblom is an Associate Professor and Clinical Education Coordinator for Speech-Language Pathology at the University of Pittsburgh, where she provides course instruction to both undergraduate and graduate students. Her areas of interest encompass best practice in the provision of clinical services, school-based language and literacy services including service delivery options, and higher education pedagogy.
    • Hannah Siburt, Au.D., Ph.D. - Assistant Professor
      Hannah Siburt, Au.D., Ph.D., is a Clinical Assistant Professor and the AuD Program Coordinator at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is a graduate of Radford University and the University of Florida. Her research and clinical interests include audiologic (re)habilitation across the lifespan, listening effort and clinical education. She is a licensed audiologist in the state of North Carolina.
    Summary
    Off-campus placements are critical in training competent audiologists and speech-language pathologists. This session will address challenges that programs face ensuring the quality clinical training of graduate students.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Identifying sites that align with programs provide quality clinical education.
    • Describe strategies to building relationships with off-campus sites.
    • Identify actions for maintaining continuous collaboration with strong clinical sites.

    IPE/IPP CAPCSD Committee Presentation: Everyone Can Do IPP! (.10 CEUs)

    4/10/2021 1:15 PM - 4/10/2021 2:15 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Carolyn W. Higdon, Ed.D., CCC-SLP, F-ASHA, F-NAP - Professor, CAPCSD IPE/IPP Committee
      Dr. Carolyn Wiles Higdon, CCC-SLP, F-ASHA, F-NAP, University of Mississippi, and CEO of Wiles Higdon & Associates, LLC. Her honors include ASHA Fellow, NAP Fellow, Phi Kappa Phi, and MSHA Honors and Clinician of the Year. Dr. Higdon has served ASHA/CAA through numerous committees and boards. Dr. Higdon is past ASHA VP, current Chair of the CAPCSD IPP IPE Committee, a CAA site visitor, and Editor of SIG 17 Perspectives.
    • Ivan Campos, M.S., CCC-SLP - Speech Language Pathologist
      Ivan Campos, M.S., CCC-SLP, is a bilingual speech-language pathologist with Riverside Unified School District. His areas of interest include multilingual language development, equitable assessment practices, and service delivery for students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. He is a sought-after speaker on these and other topics. Ivan also supervises graduate students and clinical fellows. He is chair of ASHA’s Multicultural Issues Board and CSHA District 10 Director.
    • Jennifer B. Watson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, ASHA-F, BCS-F, FNAP - Professor
      Jennifer B. Watson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, ASHA-F, BCS-F, F-NAP, is a Professor and IPE Coordinator at TCU's Davies School of CSD. Dr. Watson has been active in inter- and cross-institutional efforts to prepare students for collaborative care. During her 35+ year career, Dr. Watson has served as departmental chair, undergraduate/graduate program director, and clinic director. She also has served in a number of leadership roles at ASHA, including VP for Standards/Ethics.
    • Julie M. Estis, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - COVID-19 Response Coordinator & Assoc. Professor of Speech-Language Pathology
      Julie M. Estis, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, COVID-19 Response Coordinator and Associate Professor of Speech-Language Pathology at the University of South Alabama, collaboratively creates simulation-based IPE experiences for nursing, respiratory therapy, audiology, and medical students and uses expertise in team-based learning to create team-based IPE activities and courses.
    • Samantha Ghali, M.H.S., CCC-SLP - Ph.D. Student
    • Teresa Girolamo, M.S., M.A. - Ph.D. Candidate
      Teresa Girolamo, M.S., M.A., is a Ph.D. candidate in child language at the University of Kansas. Her interests lie in advancing equity and inclusion. In research, Teresa is interested in the language abilities of individuals with autism across the lifespan and currently works with minority young adults on the autism spectrum. In CSD and higher education, Teresa is committed to working to ensure everyone has equitable access to opportunities.
    Summary
    Inter-professional education and practice (IPE/IPP) present specific challenges to many in the field of CSD, despite their importance to students, practitioners in allied health, and researchers. This presentation discusses an instantiated example of IPE/IPP that professionals with backgrounds spanning practice and research, as well as CSD and special education. This case study offers key considerations and actionable steps for those endeavoring to advance CSD through collaboration. One conclusion is that, while IPE/IPP may require innovative approaches and work to build bridges, they offer the opportunity for all in CSD to more strongly advocate for the profession

    Learning Objectives:
    • Describe 4 actionable steps for developing an IPE/IPP partnership.
    • Identify three key considerations in developing IPE/IPP partnerships.
    • Participants will be able to evaluate the benefits of and potential challenges to IPE/IPP.

    Recruiting Historically Excluded Students for Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (.10 CEUs)

    4/10/2021 1:15 PM - 4/10/2021 2:15 PM ET

    Speakers
    • Antony Joseph, Au.D., Ph.D., CCC-A CPS/A F-NAP - Assistant Professor
      Dr. Antony Joseph is an Assistant Professor at Illinois State University in the CSD Department. A licensed practitioner for over 30 years, and 24-year active duty retired Naval Officer, he is certified by the American Speech-Language and Hearing Association and the Council for Accreditation in Occupational Hearing Conservation as a Professional Supervisor. Joseph is a clinical educator at the Speech and Hearing Clinic, leading the campus Occupational Hearing Conservation Program.
    • Kerry C. Mandulak, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - Associate Professor
      As Chair of Graduate Admissions in the Pacific University School of Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD), Kerry Callahan Mandulak, Associate Professor, has seen firsthand the power of using holistic review processes to increase the diversity of the speech-language pathology and audiology workforce. She has served as member and past Chair of the CSDCAS Committee. Through her research and speaking opportunities, Dr. Mandulak continues the national conversation around this important work.
    Summary
    In 2018, 8.0% of American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) members and affiliates were members of a racial minority (compared with 27.6% of the U.S. population, according to the 2010 Census). Universities began strategically looking at recruitment and retention practices in response to lack of progress in increasing representation. This session will identify and discuss issues that may increase representation in the CSD profession from the contexts of recruitment, admissions, inclusive teaching, and retention.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Evaluate existing recruitment, admissions, and retention processes and compare them to current best practices.
    • Describe evidence supporting key areas primed for change to improve recruitment and retention practices, including inclusive teaching practices.
    • Identify three possible strategies for implementation within their program.

    ** Not Attending a Session During this Time Slot

    4/10/2021 1:15 PM - 4/10/2021 2:15 PM ET

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